Online Publication Catalog


Filter titles by tag:

In descending order, by date published.

 


 

production practices


ID-269

Using Electric Offsets as Part of Fencing Systems

8/18/2021 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Chris Teutsch

The objective of this publication is to provide practical tips for installing electrified offsets that can effectively control livestock and extend the life of new and existing fencing.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 4.90 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-160

Decision Aid for Estimating the Cost of Using a Drone in Production Agriculture

6/9/2021 (new)
Authors: Gabriel Abdulai, Joshua Jackson, Karla Ladino

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), commonly known as drones, play an increasingly important role in production agriculture. UAS are already widely used in agriculture for monitoring livestock, inspecting fence lines, and evaluating crops and pastures (e.g., yield, quality, nutrients, water stress, pest pressure, disease impact). The cost of using a UAS will depend on a variety of factors, including platform-based capabilities, maintenance, and insurance. As with any investment, the economic benefit derived from using a UAS should be determined prior to purchase.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 9



PPFS-GH-8

Managing Tobamoviruses in Greenhouse Production

5/13/2021 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

Tobamoviruses, including tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the new tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV), can be persistent in greenhouses and other protected cropping environments. Herbaceous ornamentals, vegetables, and tobacco can be affected by tobamoviruses. Once introduced into a site, these viruses can spread rapidly, reducing plant quality and yields. Prevention and careful sanitation are important to maintaining a virus-free production environment for current and future crops.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Greenhouse Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GH series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, greenhouse, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 980 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-48

Bermudagrass: A Summer Forage in Kentucky

4/6/2021 (minor revision)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Bermudagrass can be used successfully as part of a livestock forage program to supplement summer production of cool-season grasses. It is high-yielding, sod-forming, warm-season perennial grass that is most productive on well-drained, fertile soils. Bermudagrass is widely grown in the southern United States for pasture and hay.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 2.05 mb
Pages: 6



ASC-245

Feeding Soybeans to Beef Cattle

3/24/2021 (new)
Authors: Jeff Lehmkuhler, Katherine VanValin

Various factors such as delayed planting, early frost, drought or suppressed market prices may lead one to consider feeding soybeans to cattle. Soybeans can be fed to beef cattle as an energy and protein source. Depending upon the stage of development, soybeans will have varying degrees of feed value and a feed test for nutrient content is recommended.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, soybeans
Size: 308 kb
Pages: 3



ID-230

Blackpatch of Forage Legumes: Cause of Slaframine Toxicosis or "Slobbers" in Animals

3/5/2021 (major revision)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Shane Bogle, Bob Coleman, Ray Smith, Kiersten Wise

Blackpatch is an important fungal disease of forage legumes in Kentucky. A metabolite produced by the fungus can result in slaframine toxicosis or "slobbers" in many animals. The fungal disease was first reported in Kentucky in 1933 on red clover. Most Extension literature associates blackpatch and slaframine with red clover, which is very susceptible to the disease. However, many forage legumes including alfalfa can be infected by the causal fungus.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Caldwell County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 700 kb
Pages: 3



PPA-50

Drone Fungicide Applications in Corn

3/5/2021 (new)
Authors: Ricky Arnett, Pat Hardesty, Nick Roy, Kiersten Wise

Drone technology has improved in recent years and has also become more accessible. In Kentucky, commercial drone fungicide application is now an option in several areas. Drones specifically designed to apply products can potentially be used to apply fungicide in fields that are not accessible to other aircraft. This publication describes experiments to determine if drone fungicide applications can reduce foliar diseases in corn and discusses factors to consider when using drone technology to apply fungicides.

Departments: Adair County, Green County, Plant Pathology, Taylor County
Series: Plant Pathology (PPA series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-159

Using Drones to Monitor Fence Lines

2/16/2021 (new)
Authors: Joshua Jackson

The escape of livestock is a serious concern for producers. Escaped animals can potentially damage property and/or injure people, especially when they are loose in undesired areas. Fence line inspection and the monitoring of gates, wires, and latches is a time-consuming task that must be regularly conducted to mitigate the risk of escape. The use of drones to evaluate fence lines is one of the newer methods being evaluated for farmers. With their onboard camera, rapid flight speed, and ability to fly over obstacles, drones have potential to expedite fence line inspection.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 3.50 mb
Pages: 7



AGR-255

Strategies for Reclaiming Hay Feeding Areas

12/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Kelly Mercier, Chris Teutsch

Hoof damage from livestock during the winter months can result in almost complete disturbance of desired vegetation and soil structure in and around hay feeding areas. Even well-designed hay feeding pads will have significant damage at the edges where animals enter and leave. Highly disturbed areas create perfect growing conditions for summer annual weeds like spiny pigweed and cocklebur. Weed growth is stimulated by lack of competition from a healthy and vigorous sod and the high fertility from the concentrated area of dung, urine, and rotting hay. The objective of this publication is to outline strategies for rapidly establishing stands of desirable forage species on these areas.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, production practices
Size: 985 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-252

Soil Sampling Pastures and Hayfields

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Edwin Ritchey, Chris Teutsch

Adequate soil fertility in pastures and hayfields is key to maintaining productivity and optimizing profitability. Soil testing is the basis of well-designed fertilization and liming programs. In order to develop effective programs, soil samples must be collected in a manner that results in an accurate representation of each pasture or hayfield area. The objective of this publication is to provide guidelines that, when followed, result in representative soil samples.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 480 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-254

Grain Drill Calibration: Don't Make a Mistake--CALIBRATE!

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jessica Buckman, Chris Teutsch

Grain drill calibration is a critical, yet often ignored part of successful forage establishment and pasture renovation. Planting lower seed rates than recommended can result in thin stands that are susceptible to weed encroachment. Planting more than the recommended seeding rate is undesirable due to increased seed costs. The following calibration method can be applied across a wide range of grain drill types and manufacturers and minimizes the need to carry out detailed mathematical calculations.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 2



AGR-257

Hay Sampling: Strategies for Getting a Good Sample

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jordyn Bush, Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Chris Teutsch

Knowing the nutritional quality of forage and hay is an integral part of a profitable and efficient livestock operation. Accurate estimation of forage quality starts with obtaining a representative sample of the forage to be fed. Proper sampling technique is critical. Hay is preserved in different packages ranging from the small square bale weighing 40-50 lb to the large square bale weighing more than 1500 lb. In Kentucky, most hay is packaged in large round bales weighing between 500 and 1500 lb. Wrapped bale silage is also gaining popularity and should be sampled in a similar manner to large round hay bales with the exceptions listed here.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, production practices
Size: 5.16 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-6

Chemical Control of Weeds in Kentucky Grain Crops, 2021

11/9/2020 (major revision)
Authors: J.D. Green, Travis Legleiter

The use of herbicides suggested in this publication is based on research at the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station and elsewhere. We have given what we believe to be the most effective herbicides, with the most suitable rates and times of application. Smaller files are available here.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, pests, production practices, small grains, soybeans, weeds
Size: 6.60 mb
Pages: 140



HO-124

Water Use and Water Footprint in Container-Grown Nursery and Greenhouse Crops

10/29/2020 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Josh Knight

The objective of this publication is to define the analytical terms that characterize water management and present case studies to illustrate those terms. The comparison of water use and water footprint among specialty crop growers is not only affected by the production system (including species and management strategies) but by geography and season. This document builds upon published models of representative plant production systems. These models include container production using recycled water in the mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, southwest, and Pacific northwest regions of the U.S. and greenhouse production implementing rainfall capture and overhead and ebb/flood irrigation strategies in the southeast.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, production practices
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 8



AEN-156

Using a Kit to Set up a Cattle Scale System under a Squeeze Chute

10/23/2020 (new)
Authors: Joshua Jackson

On cattle operations, the use of a scale system to weigh animals is vital to the proper administration of health products such as dewormers and antibiotics, and for making management decisions. A scale system mounted to a chute allows animals to be securely restrained for measuring weights accurately and minimally impacts cattle flow through the working facilities. Excitable animals can be properly restrained and, with their movement limited, cattle can be weighed accurately.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 6.83 mb
Pages: 9



HO-89

Characteristics of Kentucky's Nursery and Greenhouse Industries, 2020

10/5/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram

The purpose of this publication is to characterize Kentucky's nursery and greenhouse industry in relation to the national and re-gional industry by gleaning information from the national surveys conducted by the Green Industry Research Consortium for 2018, 2013, 2008, and 2003. The survey data will be augmented by information obtained from the experiences of the authors and from conversations with nursery owners. Information is presented relative to employment, plant types sold, product types, markets and marketing channels, sales methods and marketing practices, advertising expenditures, integrated pest management practices, water sources, and irrigation methods.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, greenhouse, production practices
Size: 569 kb
Pages: 11



AEN-155

The Importance of Water Source Layout in Farm Infrastructure

8/28/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Water source layout is a critical infrastructure component for cattle and cattle producers. Strategic water resource layout is a part of a farmstead plan that does not always get adequate attention, despite its critical importance. Nonetheless, when farm infrastructure planning incorporates the latest practices, rules, and knowledge, the resulting design can satisfy generations of users.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 3.56 mb
Pages: 6



PPFS-GH-7

Cleaning and Sanitizing Commercial Greenhouse Surfaces

8/3/2020 (new)
Authors: Samantha Anderson, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Josh Knight, W. Garrett Owen

Greenhouse and nursery sanitation practices help prevent the introduction and spread of plant diseases and pests, as well as eliminate safety hazards. In general, being proactive in maintaining a clean growing environment will often be less expensive and more effective than reacting to a disease or pest issue after it emerges.

Departments: Graves County, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Greenhouse Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GH series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, garden and landscape, greenhouse, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 750 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-152

Building a Hoop Barn

7/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Hoop barns are a cost-effective alternative to pole barns. For example, a farmer might choose a hoop barn when deciding to expand hay sales, or for providing cover for costly equipment. Hoop barns have the additional benefit of being a construction project that can be done by the farmer (and a group of friends), which can provide an additional cost savings. This publication goes through the steps involved by following the construction of two hoop barns built by a local farmer. In this case, hoop barns were built to increase the farm's hay storage capacity.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 8.14 mb
Pages: 14



ID-224

Producer's Guide to Pasture-Based Beef Finishing

7/13/2020 (reprinted)
Authors: Greg Halich, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Lee Meyer, Gregg Rentfrow, Ray Smith

Will pasture-finished beef eventually become a commodity with lowered product prices? These and other questions must be evaluated by those considering pasture-based beef finishing. As with any new enterprise, however, the learning curve is steep, and success requires a commitment to working through the many production, marketing, and processing details. This reference guide provides a foundation for this process.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.51 mb
Pages: 48



PPFS-GEN-17

Cleaning and Disinfecting Home Garden Tools and Equipment

6/26/2020 (new)
Authors: Kara Back, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Kimberly Leonberger

Dirty tools, containers, and surfaces come as no surprise to home gardeners (Figure 1). Rinsing with water to remove obvious soil or plant residues is a common practice. However, this type of basic cleaning can fail to remove microscopic plant pathogens that can remain on surfaces. Tools, containers, shoes, and surfaces should also be disinfected to remove fungal, bacterial, and viral plant pathogens to prevent transmission to healthy plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology, Taylor County
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: crops and plants, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 707 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-151

Lanes for Beef Cattle Operations

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The benefits of lanes can be applied to pasture-based Kentucky cattle operations of any size. Lanes can be used to move cattle from pasture to pasture, and to access structures or barns, handling facilities, load-out areas, and areas with shade.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 2.89 mb
Pages: 2



AEN-148

Considerations in Goat Barn Design

3/30/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Katie Jackson, Joe Taraba

Farmers who raise goats for meat or milk need guidance in the interrelated tasks of choosing a barn design and managing temperatures for their herd. Barn orientation, ventilation design, and stocking density are all important considerations which impact goats socially and physiologically, potentially impacting production. While other species are relatively well studied in these areas, research on goats is somewhat limited. The goal of this publication is to provide recommendations drawn from research in goats and sufficiently similar species.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 175 kb
Pages: 5



AEN-149

Heat Stress in Goats

3/30/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Katie Jackson, Joe Taraba

Heat stress is prevalent in most livestock species, but especially in dairy animals where large quantities of energy are necessary to sustain milk production. Both dairy goats in lactation and meat goats, which are being fed for growth, are susceptible to heat stress. Knowing the physiological signs to observe (like panting or excessive drinking) can make heat stress more apparent.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, livestock, non-traditional, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 159 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-1

Lime and Fertilizer Recommendations, 2020-2021

3/18/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Josh McGrath, Edwin Ritchey

Recommended nutrient additions, based on a soil test, are only made when a crop yield or economic response has been measured for that crop under Kentucky soil-climatic conditions. Many field studies have been conducted by the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station under Kentucky farm conditions to determine the extent of any primary, secondary, or micronutrient needs. Yield and soil test data from these studies serve as guidelines for establishing recommendations contained in this publication. Recommendations in this publication strive to supply the plant nutrients needed to achieve maximum economic return assuming good management practices.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 1.44 mb
Pages: 29



PPFS-AG-T-6

Black Shank of Tobacco

3/9/2020 (new)
Authors: Emily Pfeufer

Black shank is one of the most important diseases of burley and dark tobacco in Kentucky. It tends to cause the greatest losses in fields with a history of black shank, during seasons with a wet to moderate early season followed by a dry August. Management is dependent on the successful combination of crop rotation, resistant varieties, and soil-directed fungicide applications.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: crops and plants, farm crops, pests, plant diseases, production practices, tobacco
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 3



AEN-147

Structures for Beef Cattle

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Livestock housing, whether simple or sophisticated, must perform the required functions. It should meet the thermal and physical needs of the animal; it should provide a place to store and feed materials without damage or loss; it should increase the performance of cattle; and, it should allow the producer to conduct all chores associated with cattle production efficiently. A building can contribute to management efficiency and animal performance, which itself is defined by productivity, health and welfare. The building should create optimum environmental conditions for cattle by providing light, air flow, appropriate flooring, space, and ventilation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, crops and plants, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 956 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-245

Nitrogen for Kentucky Turfgrasses

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is required by turfgrass in larger quantities than any other mineral nutrient because the plant demand for N is high and the supply of N from the natural environment is normally low. In instances where N is not applied according to the University of Kentucky recommendations, applied N can increase the risk of surface and ground water contamination. The objective of this document is to describe the function of N in turfgrass, explain how soil and tissue tests can be used to manage N applications, and to describe the various N fertilizer sources available for application to turfgrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 168 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-145

Designing or Reworking Your Cattle-handling Facilities: A Checklist for Success

2/3/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Cattle-handling facilities should be designed to match the management goals of the operation. The safety of workers and cattle should be the highest priority when designing or reworking a handling facility. A well-designed facility will make working cattle faster, safer, less labor intensive, and less frustrating.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, crops and plants, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-246

Iron for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/20/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Iron (Fe) is commonly applied using granular or foliar sources to enhance turfgrass color. Iron applications can result in darker green turfgrass as a result of increased Fe uptake or Fe oxidation on the leaf surface. In many cases, Fe results in no turfgrass response at all. Understanding the dynamics of Fe both in the plant and in the soil can enhance your nutrient management programs. The objective of this publication is to explain the function of Fe within the plant, describe the Fe sources available for turfgrasses, and identify which Fe fertilizers are most effective.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 1.78 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-242

Calcium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Calcium (Ca) is the dominant cation in all soils of agronomic importance and Kentucky soils are no different. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Ca. Consequently, Ca deficiency in Kentucky turfgrasses is extremely rare, and the probability of observing a Ca response on golf courses, home lawns, sod production, or sports fields is very low. Applying Ca fertilizers to artificially increase soil Ca above the level necessary for proper plant growth normally does not result in an increase in plant uptake because Ca uptake is genetically controlled. Regardless, Ca is commonly applied in both granular and liquid forms.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 112 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-243

Magnesium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Magnesium is an essential element for all plants. Soluble magnesium (Mg) exists in soils primarily as Mg2+, a positively charged divalent cation. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Mg and, thus, Mg applications to turfgrass are normally unnecessary. However, turfgrasses grown in sand-based rootzones, such as golf course putting greens and sand-based sports fields, are prone to Mg deficiency. When Mg is necessary, it is essential to understand the function of Mg in the plant, the dynamics of Mg in the soil, and the forms of Mg fertilizers.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 826 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-244

Phosphorus for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Brad Lee, Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Phosphorus (P) is an essential plant nutrient and a common component of many turfgrass nutrition programs. Although P application can improve turfgrass quality in some soils, most soils of Kentucky already have adequate plant-available P to support healthy turfgrass growth. What is the function of P within the plant, and how much P is required to sustain acceptable turfgrass in Kentucky? Also, if P applications are necessary, when and how should P be applied?

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 481 kb
Pages: 4



VET-36

Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle

12/9/2019 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by Anaplasma marginale, an organism that invades cattle red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in severe anemia, weight loss, fever, abortion and death in adult cattle. Anaplasmosis is considered a "tick-borne" disease because ticks transmit the organism when feeding on cattle. However, spread of this disease can be by any method that moves fresh blood from infected to susceptible cattle. In addition to ticks, the Anaplasma organism may be spread by biting insects (mosquitoes, horse flies, stable flies) or using blood-contaminated tools such as dehorners, ear taggers, castration tools, and implant guns without disinfection between animals. A very common method of transmission is using the same hypodermic needle on multiple animals when administering vaccines to the herd. Transmission may also be from cow to calf during gestation.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-144

Four Beef Cattle Barn Flooring Options: A Case Study

11/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Barn floor design is critical to the physical and thermal comfort, health and safety of cattle. Generally speaking, barn flooring is the surface on which an animal stands, lies down, and excretes its urine and manure. Therefore, to meet animal needs, it must be durable, not slippery, and well drained, as well as comfortable, warm, and dry. In addition to providing animal comfort, the flooring should easily be cleaned. No single material, from concrete to soil, meets all of these specifications.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, crops and plants, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 3.55 mb
Pages: 3



AEN-142

Loose Housing for First-Calf Heifers: A Case Study

11/11/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The loose housing system increases the productivity of the replacement herd and the stockman by providing the optimum environment for production and management. While there is work in creating the system upfront, the design will reduce effort later by creating greater efficiency, flow, and movement of materials.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-143

Calf Areas, Pens or Pastures: A Case Study

11/11/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The creation of a creep pen or pasture area can be accomplished using various methods and materials. Using what is on hand and/or revitalizing an unused area of the farm that has infrastructure may reduce expenses. The cost of one fallen calf could pay for the implementation of the practice. This practice may benefit spring calves over fall calves, so that might be a consideration when choosing a time to plan construction of your creep area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 3



ID-188

Strategic Winter Feeding of Cattle using a Rotational Grazing Structure

7/30/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Winter feeding of cattle is a necessary part of nearly all cow-calf operations. In winter months, livestock producers often confine animals to smaller "sacrifice" pastures to reduce the area damaged from winter feeding. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have significant negative impacts on soil and water quality. Such areas include locations in floodplains, such as those along creek bottoms or around barns near streams. These locations are convenient, flat areas for setting hay ring feeders; however, their negative effects on water quality outweigh the convenience.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 737 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-134

Fenceline Feeder Systems for Beef Cattle Production and Resource Conservation

7/29/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

One of the most challenging and costly aspects of beef cattle production in Kentucky is winter-feeding. Many producers complain about the time required to feed stored forages, the mud, the drudgery that it creates for the operator, and the decline in production. The intense traffic associated with winter-feeding on unimproved surfaces causes mud, compaction, erosion, and loss of desirable vegetation, often resulting in annual pasture renovations to address areas impacted by winter-feeding practices. Fenceline feeding systems offer an alternative to traditional in-field bale feeding during the wet winter conditions that Kentucky often experiences. These structures can be utilized to reduce the impact of winter-feeding on pastures and improve the operational efficiency of a winter-feeding area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 2.55 mb
Pages: 13



PPFS-FR-S-24

Backyard Grape Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.21 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-S-25

Backyard Berry Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.04 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-21

Backyard Apple and Pear Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.01 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-22

Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 890 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-141

Maps for Farm Planning

6/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Planning and design are critical steps when modernizing a farm to meet the current and future operational needs. Farm renovations and redevelopment must always consider the cost/benefit of changes, while staying consistent with good agricultural practice guidelines that conserve labor and the resources of the farm. The process of developing a farm map will be used to guide producers on the concepts and considerations necessary to make decisions related to planning renovations and developing new infrastructure on the farm.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.32 mb
Pages: 4



HO-122

Go with the Flow: Simple Calculations for Drip Irrigation

5/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Brent Rowell

While drip irrigation is relatively easy, information about drip irrigation is often more complicated and confusing than it needs to be. Well-meaning professors and engineers use terms like "head" and "flow rate" without explaining exactly what they mean and how they are used. And it's often difficult to get help planning a small farm system in states without large irrigated acreages and irrigation traditions. The purpose of this bulletin is to help farmers understand the simple calculations involved in designing a small drip irrigation system.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 6



AEN-138

Protecting Pastured Cattle using Windbreaks and Mounds

4/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Research shows that cattle benefit from summer shade and winter shelter. Pastured cattle seek shelter around structures, under trees, and in forested streamside zones. These areas are often heavily trafficked and become muddy, compacted loafing areas. Mud creates further stress on cattle and compounds the problems of temperature stress and feed inefficiencies. One option that could be used to lure cattle from these areas and provide winter shelter and summer shade is a constructed windbreak fence on a mound.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.80 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-19

Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, pests, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 995 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-20

Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, pests, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 896 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-21

Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, pests, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 874 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-22

Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, pests, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 460 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-23

Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, pests, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 788 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-137

Farm Gates: Design Considerations

2/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Farm gates are a necessity for controlling traffic and increasing security. There are many design considerations for optimizing a system of farm gates. Very few gates incorporate all the recommended design components that will be discussed in this publication. However, to move people, materials, equipment, and livestock through a gateway, the gateway should economize time, be navigable, and operate in an efficient manner. Time spent operating a poorly designed gateway is time wasted and a hindrance to production. This publication is a guide to aid producers in creating more functional designs for gateways.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 2.50 mb
Pages: 6



AEN-136

Fence Line Stiles, Escapes, and Refuges

1/23/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Michele McHugh, Lee Moser

Opening farm gates for trucks, tractors, equipment, and livestock is unavoidable. However, opening a large gate, or a set of gates, for a person on foot is extremely inefficient, especially if the entrance does not put the producer where they need to be. An inconveniently located gate can lead to additional steps and unnecessary movements. Opening gates may require dealing with clasps, chains, or ropes just to get the gate unfastened. The gate may then have to be lifted or dragged open and closed. The bottom-line is that entering a poorly installed and unmaintained gateway can make the experience of opening and closing gates a time consuming nuisance.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 9.30 mb
Pages: 4



ID-252

Equine Cushing's Disease or PPID

12/18/2018 (new)
Authors: Amanda Adams, Fernanda Camargo, Ashton Miller

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is one of the most common endocrine diseases in horses, generally affecting those over the age of 15 years. It is also frequently referred to as Equine Cushing's Disease. PPID is caused by degenerative changes in an area of the brain known as the pituitary gland, hence the name of the disease. This gland is located at the base of the brain. In horses with PPID, the specific section of the pituitary gland that is most affected is called the pars intermedia. Unfortunately, in horses with PPID, changes occur within this gland, which results in increased production of a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 3



ID-235

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky

10/17/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, John Obrycki, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, Shubin Saha, Shawn Wright

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, farm crops, food crops, high tunnel, nursery and landscape, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-57

Greenhouse Tomatoes

6/12/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Greenhouse tomato production has increased in recent years, responding to consumer demand for year-round fresh produce and advances in greenhouse vegetable production practices. However, of all the greenhouse crops, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are the most complicated to grow because they require the most management, the most labor, and the most light. A grower must be committed to meeting the daily demands of production to be successful. Prospective growers need to get as much information as they can about all aspects of greenhouse production before beginning this enterprise.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, farm crops, food crops, greenhouse, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



ASC-230

Factors to Consider Before Starting a Small-scale Egg Production Enterprise in Kentucky

1/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

There are several things to consider before starting an egg production operation. The most important is market availability. Before you start production you need to have a market that your production can supply, in terms of both quantity of product and the price you need to get in order to be profitable. You will need to make sure that local regulations allow for poultry production on the land available to you. Cash flow is also an important consideration. A flock will require a considerable investment before the hens start to lay eggs to produce an income. You also need to have a way to deal with the manure produced, and any dead birds. You also need to have a plan for the hens after they have finished laying (referred to as spent hens).

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, business and records, livestock, poultry, production practices
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-233

Feeds and Feeding for Small-Scale Egg Production Enterprises

1/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Animals eat in order to get the energy and nutrients they need to live, grow and reproduce. Animals use energy to perform normal body functions such as breathing, walking, eating, digesting, and maintaining body temperature. Different types of nutrients provide energy as well as the building blocks needed for the development of bone, flesh, feathers, and eggs. These nutrients include: water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals, and vitamins. Each of these components is important and a deficit of even one can have serious health consequences for poultry.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, poultry, production practices
Size: 2.54 mb
Pages: 12



HO-120

Off the Grid: Ultra-Low Pressure Drip Irrigation and Rainwater Catchment for Small Plots and High Tunnels

1/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Krista Jacobsen, Brent Rowell

All forms of irrigation need a push or pressure to move water from its source to its destination. Water sources include wells, springs, lakes, creeks, canals, rivers, cisterns, elevated tanks, or municipal water supplies. The amount of pressure or push required depends on many things including the height water must be lifted, length and size of the delivery pipe(s), crop and size of the area to be irrigated, and the distance water needs to be moved from the source to the field, greenhouse, or tunnel.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 9.42 mb
Pages: 12



ASC-235

My Mare's in Heat: Predicting and Recognizing Signs of Estrus

1/22/2018 (new)
Authors: Amy Lawyer

You have heard the term frequently that a mare is in heat, but what does it mean exactly? Heat is the layman's term for showing signs of estrus. Whether you are planning to breed your mare or not her body will continue to prepare to be pregnant.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, production practices, reproduction and genetics
Size: 85 kb
Pages: 2



ASC-229

Marketing Regulations Affecting Small-scale Egg Producers in Kentucky

1/12/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

It is important that you comply with all the laws and regulations with regards to the marketing of eggs. Eggs are capable of carrying bacteria such as Salmonella enteritidis. As a result, eggs are considered a hazardous food and their sale is regulated. With regard to small-scale producers, if you sell more than 60 dozen eggs in any one week, you will require an egg handler's license. You will also need an egg handler's license if you sell to someone who sells eggs to someone else. This would include grocery stores, restaurants, or wholesalers. The same will hold true if you sell to a bakery, confectionary or ice-cream manufacturer.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, business and records, livestock, poultry, production practices
Size: 267 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-135

Rainwater Harvesting for Livestock Production Systems

11/7/2017 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Abundant, clean drinking water is an essential nutrient for livestock. The obvious water source that is recommended by veterinarians is city water. However, city water has its drawbacks. City water distribution systems are often expensive to install and have a recurring usage charge. In some instances, city water is unavailable, may have inadequate pressure, or producers consider it too expensive to operate, forcing them to use streams and ponds to water livestock. Collecting rainwater from a catchment area, is a low cost, high quality alternative water source that can supplement traditional water distribution systems and improve the environmental quality of farming operations. Rainwater harvesting involves the collection of rainfall from rooftops or land based catchments systems for storage and distribution as needed. Capturing rainfall has the added benefit of improving water quality by reducing soil erosion and runoff. Strategically installed rainwater harvesting systems can be used to direct stormwater around sensitive areas of the farm where animal waste is present, thus reducing the potential for nutrient and pathogen delivery to nearby waterways. Rainwater harvesting and stormwater management techniques can also reduce the volume of water that must be managed in liquid manure management systems by diverting clean water away from manure pits and lagoons.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 807 kb
Pages: 5



AEN-115

Appropriate All-Weather Surfaces for Livestock

10/16/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Stephanie Mehlhope, Lee Moser, Sarah Wightman

Many livestock producers would say that mud is a natural part of livestock production. But the creation of mud costs producers money and makes them less competitive. Livestock that walk through mud require more feed for energy but actually eat less because walking in mud requires more effort to get to feed and water. Therefore, mud decreases average daily gains. Mud accumulation on the coat increases the amount of energy needed to generate heat in the winter or to keep cool in the summer. Also, it can lower sale prices due to hanging tags. The creation of mud also increases animal stress and leads to a variety of health problems, including protozoan and bacterial infections. It is essential that livestock producers understand that mud hinders cost-efficient livestock production and efforts should be made to limit the creation of mud. This publication explains how mud is created and describes different types of hardened surfaces and pads that agricultural producers should use to reduce mud creation and ultimately increase production efficiency and protect natural resources.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 2.73 mb
Pages: 8



ID-149

2017 Kentucky Blackberry Cost and Return Estimates

10/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, John Strang, Tim Woods, Shawn Wright

Potential producers should realize that while thornless semi-erect varieties produce superior economic returns, thorny and thornless erect varieties may hold some marketing advantages that can command superior prices and result in better returns than those estimated using these standard assumptions.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: business and records, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, production practices
Size: 265 kb
Pages: 20



PPFS-AG-C-5

Diplodia Ear Rot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Diplodia ear rot can reduce yield and grain quality by damaging kernels, lowering grain test weight, and reducing grain fill. Incidence of affected ears in the field can vary from 1% or 2% to as high as 80%. Although mycotoxins have been associated with Diplodia ear rot in South America and South Africa, there have been no reports of livestock feeding issues due to mycotoxins linked to Diplodia ear rot in the United States.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 990 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-C-6

Holcus Leaf Spot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Holcus leaf spot, a bacterial disease, can be seen sporadically in Kentucky cornfields, and it is challenging to diagnose. This publication describes the disease symptoms, conditions that favor disease, and how to distinguish holcus spot from herbicide injury that can mimic this disease.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, pests, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 889 kb
Pages: 3



ID-247

Pastured Poultry

9/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore, Ray Smith

There has been an increased interest in pasture-raising poultry for both meat and egg production in the last decade. Raising poultry on pasture was a common occurrence until the latter half of the 20th century. Fresh forage provided an important ration balancing factor during the years before poultry nutritionists fully understood the required essential vitamins and minerals for growth and optimum meat and egg production. With the development of balanced rations, poultry no longer require access to pasture and year-round production of meat and eggs is possible. However, there are still some benefits from the lush forage, invertebrates, and exercise that pasture provides. In addition, we continue to learn more and more about the positive influence that fresh grasses and legumes have on fatty acid profiles and general bird health. As a result, there is an increased interest in pasture-raised poultry for both meat and eggs.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, poultry, production practices
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 7



ASC-206

Common External Parasites of Poultry

9/8/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Periodic examination of your flock is recommended so that infestations can be detected early and a larger flock outbreak contained. It is especially important to detect infestations early in food-producing poultry because there are restrictions on the treatments available.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, poultry, production practices
Size: 839 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-62

High Tunnel Tomatoes

9/5/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels, also known as hoop houses, are simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures that typically do not use fans for ventilation. Tunnels can be covered with one or two sheets of plastic; those covered with two have an air layer in between, thus offering better insulation and, consequently, more cold protection (and wind protection). High tunnels are used to extend the growing season earlier into spring and later into fall. Determinate and indeterminate tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) can be successfully grown in this production system, yielding a potentially profitable "out of season."

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, farm crops, food crops, high tunnel, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



ASC-228

Body Condition Scoring Ewes

8/25/2017 (new)
Authors: Debra Aaron, Don Ely

Body condition scoring is a system of classifying breeding ewes on the basis of differences in body fat. While it is subjective, with practice it can be accurate enough to indicate the nutritional status of individual ewes as well as the entire flock. Thus, it allows the shepherd to identify, record, and adjust the feed intake of ewes determined to be thin, in average flesh, or fat. In the long run, this can save money for producers and/or prevent problems attributable to ewe condition.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, small ruminants
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 5



CCD-FS-6

Three-Year Average Prices and Quantities at Kentucky Produce Auctions: 2014-2016

8/15/2017 (new)
Authors: Martin Bechu, Alex Butler, Brett Wolff, Tim Woods

This report compares average volumes and prices for 18 crops from two major Kentucky produce auctions for the 2014, 2015, and 2016 seasons.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags: business and records, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 22



AEN-133

Tire Tanks for Watering Livestock

8/8/2017 (new)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Steve Higgins, Joshua Jackson, Lee Moser

Kentucky's abundant forage and extensive stream system have helped the Commonwealth become the largest beef producing state east of the Mississippi River. While streams and ponds serve as a water source for many operations, livestock can quickly degrade soil and water quality by trampling streambanks and defecating and urinating in and around waterbodies. These actions increase sediment, pathogen, and nutrient loads to streams, rivers, and lakes which in turn can causes eutrophication. To help protect the health of Kentucky's soil and water, producers can implement best management practices (BMPs). These practices help reduce the sources of pollutants and/or the transport of pollutants to waterways. One such practice or BMP is limiting cattle access to streams and ponds. When producers exclude livestock access to stream and ponds and their associated riparian buffers, an alternative source of water is required. Automatic water fountains are one commonly used means of providing cattle with water from an alternate source. A water tank constructed using a heavy equipment tire may serve as a viable option for supplying livestock with an alternate source of water.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 4.65 mb
Pages: 8



SR-111

Economic Analysis of the University of Kentucky Community Supported Agriculture Organic Vegetable Production System

7/12/2017 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Carl Dillon, Tiffany Thompson, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Farms marketing through a vegetable CSA are complex businesses facing many operational and economic challenges. To be economically viable, CSA farms must achieve the appropriate match of crops, equipment, and labor with farm size and number of CSA members. A diverse array of vegetable crops are typically grown with unique requirements for crop production, pest management, harvest, and post-harvest handling. An extensive suite of skills, tools, and equipment are required to produce these crops efficiently, and mechanization becomes critical as the number of acres in production increases.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, organic production, production practices, research, vegetables
Size: 6.50 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-60

High Tunnel Leafy Greens and Herbs

7/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels and other season extension techniques allow producers to extend the time period over which cash flows are generated from produce crops. High tunnel production is expanding to supply the increasing demand for locally grown produce, as well as policy and grant programs favoring high tunnel production. High tunnel production of leafy greens and herbs can also enable producers to market products at higher prices, before the start of a traditional local season. High tunnel leafy greens and herbs are typically added by producers already selling through direct markets: farmers markets, CSAs (community supported agriculture programs), and direct to local restaurants and groceries.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, farm crops, food crops, high tunnel, production practices, vegetables
Size: 893 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-63

Hydroponic Lettuce

6/30/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is one of the most commonly grown hydroponic vegetables. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants without soil. Plants may be grown in a nutrient solution only (liquid culture) or they may be supported by an inert medium (aggregate culture). In both systems all of the plants' nutritional needs are supplied through the irrigation water.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, food crops, hydroponics, nursery and landscape, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-110

Organic Sweet Corn

11/23/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Organic sweet corn is produced using pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic pesticides or petroleum-based fertilizers. Because organic crop production standards are regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP), growers producing and selling sweet corn labeled "organic" must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency. While there are benefits to using the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) for the certification process, Kentucky residents can be certified by any approved agency operating in the Commonwealth.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 604 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-111

Organic Tomatoes

11/23/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are one of the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky. With the rising consumer demand for organic products, organic tomatoes should be an excellent prospect for local fresh market sales.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 566 kb
Pages: 6



ID-143

Rotational Grazing

11/21/2016 (reprinted)
Authors: Roy Burris, Bob Coleman, Jimmy Henning, Garry Lacefield, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Ray Smith

A rotational grazing program can generally be defined as use of several pastures, one of which is grazed while the others are rested before being regrazed. Continuous grazing is the use of one pasture for the entire grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 887 kb
Pages: 16



CCD-CP-58

Greenhouse-grown Specialty Cut Flowers

11/11/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

"Specialty cut flowers" generally refers to cut flower species other than roses, carnations, and chrysanthemums. Some of the specialty cut flowers that can be grown successfully in Kentucky greenhouses, or other protected environments such as high tunnels, include anemone (Anemone spp.), Asiatic or oriental lilies (Lilium spp.), bachelor button or cornflower (Centaurea spp.), celosia or cockscomb (Celosia spp.), coral bell (Heuchera hybrids), freesia (Freesia hybrids), larkspur (Delphinium spp.), lisianthus (Eustoma spp.), snapdragon (Antirrhinum spp.), pollenless sunflowers (Helianthis annus) and zinnias (Zinnia spp.), and sweetpea (Lathyrus odoratus).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, flowers, greenhouse, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, production practices
Size: 503 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-12

Organic Blackberries and Raspberries

11/3/2016 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Blackberries and raspberries (both Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as "brambles" or "caneberries." Erect (thorny and thornless), thorny primocane fruiting, and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries, as well as fall bearing raspberries, present an opportunity for organic production in Kentucky. Pests, especially spotted wing drosophila (SWD), present the greatest challenge for organic bramble production.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, production practices
Size: 799 kb
Pages: 5



ASC-226

Help! My Horse Roars! What Is Laryngeal Hemiplegia?

10/10/2016 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Various ailments can affect the different parts of the larynx of horses. Diseases of the larynx can produce airway obstruction and sometimes dysphagia. Obstructive diseases, such as laryngeal hemiplegia, often produce an abnormal respiratory noise and, most important, they limit airflow, which leads to early fatigue and poor exercise performance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 402 kb
Pages: 4



ID-239

Equine Metabolic Syndrome: Is My Horse Just Fat, or Is He Sick?

10/4/2016 (new)
Authors: Amanda Adams, Fernanda Camargo

Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is an endocrine disorder that affects equids (horses, ponies, and donkeys) in three defining ways: they are obese and/or have localized fat deposits, they are in an insulin resistance (IR) state, now referred to as insulin dysregulation (ID), and they are predisposed to developing laminitis.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.47 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-109

Organic Lettuce and Leafy Greens

8/5/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Leafy greens and lettuce, which are among the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky, have excellent potential for organic production. Organic crops are produced using integrated pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling lettuce and greens with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state agency (e.g. the Kentucky Department of Agriculture) or private agency, plus follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 575 kb
Pages: 6



ID-236

Providing Water for Beef Cattle in Rotational Grazing Systems

8/2/2016 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Kevin Laurent, Lee Moser

Water is the most essential nutrient for cattle production. Water is used in almost every bodily function, including digestion, milk production, and excretion. Given the role and function of water in relation to animal production, health, and welfare, it is critical that abundant, clean water is available in any livestock production operation. Livestock must have immediate access to water within every paddock of a rotational grazing system to realize maximum efficiency and production.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 3.00 mb
Pages: 6



CCD-CP-108

Organic Asparagus

6/1/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Asparagus is grown primarily in Kentucky for fresh market, especially near large population centers. Potential markets for organic asparagus include roadside stands, farmers markets, cooperatives, community supported agriculture (CSA) subscriptions, produce auctions, and local wholesalers. Restaurants, health food stores, and locally owned grocers may also be interested in Kentucky-grown organic products. Kentucky's market window for asparagus, which varies depending on region, can start as early as April and run through the month of June.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 513 kb
Pages: 4



ID-163

Agricultural Lime Recommendations Based on Lime Quality

1/13/2016 (major revision)
Authors: David Ditsch, Josh McGrath, Lloyd Murdock, Edwin Ritchey, Frank Sikora

Soil acidity is one of the most important soil factors affecting crop growth and ultimately, yield and profitability. It is determined by measuring the soil pH, which is a measure of the amount of hydrogen ions in the soil solution. As soil acidity increases, the soil pH decreases. Soils tend to be naturally acidic in areas where rainfall is sufficient to cause substantial leaching of basic ions (such as calcium and magnesium), which are replaced by hydrogen ions. Most soils in Kentucky are naturally acidic because of our abundant rainfall.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 485 kb
Pages: 6



SR-110

Etymology of the Scientific Names of Some Endoparasites of Horses

10/29/2015 (new)
Authors: Gene Lyons

The use of only common names for parasites can be confusing because of lack of uniformity. Fortunately a huge contribution for science was made by the Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus who is considered the father of taxonomy. English translation of the scientific names here are mainly from "dictionary" sources. A few are from the original descriptions. More than one possible meaning is listed for some of the scientific names.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 114 kb
Pages: 4



ID-229

All-Weather Surfaces for Cattle Watering Facilities

7/28/2015 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Kevin Laurent, Kylie Schmidt, Donald Stamper

Strategically locating the watering facility will also provide production benefits such as increased forage utilization and improved access to water, and may possibly reduce the cost per pasture of providing water. This publication will provide guidelines for the location, design, and construction of all-weather surfaces for cattle watering facilities.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, production practices
Size: 2.98 mb
Pages: 6



SR-109

Strongyles in Horses

7/24/2015 (new)
Authors: Gene Lyons, Sharon Tolliver

Parasites live in a host from which they obtain food and protection. They may harm but usually do not benefit the host. The word "parasite" is derived from the Latin and Greek languages meaning, in general, "one who eats at the table of another." It is said that a "good" parasite does not overtly harm or kill its host. It is theoretically possible that a more benign parasite (e.g. Gasterophilus spp.) is much "older in eons of time" and it and its host have adjusted better to each other than a conceivably "newer" parasite (e.g. Strongylus spp.) which may be more harmful to its host.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 2.60 mb
Pages: 8



VET-35

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Staggers (Tremorgenic Syndrome)

7/20/2015 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

"Staggers" is an all-inclusive term for a group of nervous system disorders caused by indole-diterpenoid mycotoxins produced by various types of fungi on forages. These mycotoxins are collectively known as "tremorgens", and they may be found in several types of grasses at varying stages of maturity.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 588 kb
Pages: 2



ID-231

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Acute or Atypical Interstitial Pneumonia (AIP)

7/17/2015 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

In the Southeastern United States, acute interstitial pneumonia has been produced by ingestion of the leaves and seeds of perilla mint (Perilla frutescens). Perilla ketone is the toxin absorbed from the rumen into the bloodstream and carried to the lungs where it damages the lung tissue in cattle.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 507 kb
Pages: 3



ID-225

Organic Corn Production in Kentucky

1/15/2015 (new)
Authors: Chad Lee, Will Martin, Sam McNeill, Lee Meyer, Michael Montross, Edwin Ritchey, Tom Sikora

The number of organic dairy cows in Kentucky has been steadily increasing for years, yet there's not enough organic corn produced in the state to feed the growing herds. In short, a new market has developed in the state, but few local farmers are taking advantage of it. While Kentucky farmers are no strangers to corn, growing corn organically utilizes different management, cultural and marketing practices and requires new skills. And, importantly, organic production must follow an approved farm plan that allows farmers to sell their corn as certified organic. This publication is designed to be both an introduction to a new enterprise as well as a practical manual for those interested in pursuing organic corn production on their own farms.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: alternative practices, corn, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, grain crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 2.60 mb
Pages: 30



ASC-215

Mineral and Protein Blocks and Tubs for Cattle

11/3/2014 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Roy Burris, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Nutritional supplement blocks and tubs are convenient for beef producers, require no investment in feeding troughs and require a limited area for storing. One of the most attractive features is that they lower the labor needed to supplement livestock. Many producers use these products to provide supplemental nutrients to cattle consuming low-quality forages or as a mechanism to promote a more consistent intake of minerals. These products are also attractive to producers who have off-farm employment as they eliminate the need for daily feeding. Yet, they often come at a greater cost per unit of nutrient than more conventional feedstuffs. Since there are differences in the blocks and tubs being marketed today, familiarity with how to compare products and determine their differences will enable producers to decide which product best fits their needs.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 159 kb
Pages: 4



ID-226

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Hypomagnesemic Tetany or "Grass Tetany"

9/18/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Magnesium is a vital component of normal nerve conduction, muscle function, and bone mineral formation. Hypomagnesemic tetany or "grass tetany" is a disorder caused by an abnormally low blood concentration of the essential mineral magnesium (Mg). Synonyms for this disorder include spring tetany, grass staggers, wheat pasture poisoning, or lactation tetany.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 121 kb
Pages: 3



ASC-214

Is Creep Feeding Lambs a Profitable Undertaking?

9/8/2014 (new)
Authors: Don Ely, Endre Fink

Creep feeding is a technique of providing feed to nursing lambs to supplement the milk they consume. Creep-fed lambs grow faster than noncreep-feds and are more aggressive in nursing ewes. This aggression stimulates greater ewe milk production which, in turn, increases creep feed intake because these lambs will be bigger at a given age. Typically, the creep diet is a grain-protein supplement mixture and is made available in an area constructed so lambs can enter, but ewes cannot. Some situations when it may be economical to creep feed are described in this document.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, small ruminants
Size: 309 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-13

Organic Blueberries

8/20/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub that will do well in most areas of Kentucky as long as the soil pH is properly adjusted. Organic production requires the use of pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling their berries with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency and follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, production practices
Size: 633 kb
Pages: 6



ID-223

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Brassicas--Be Aware of the Animal Health Risks

8/12/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Although infrequent, brassica crops can cause animal health disorders if grazing is managed improperly. Most brassica-related disorders in cattle tend to occur during the first two weeks of grazing while adjusting to the forage. The primary potential disorders are polioencephalomalcia or PEM, hemolytic anemia (mainly with kale), nitrate poisoning, and pulmonary emphysema. Other possible clinical disorders include bloat and rumen acidosis, and metabolic problems such as hypomagnesemia and hypothyroidism with goiter. Glucosinates present in brassicas are precursors of irritants that can cause colic and diarrhea. Large bulbs may lodge in the esophagus and lead to choking. Certain brassicas (specifically rape) can cause sunburn or "scald" on light-skinned animals, especially when grazed while the plants are immature. Other potential problems include oxalate poisoning and off-flavoring of meat and milk.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 913 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-212

Fertilizing Your Lawn

7/22/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw

Lawns require fertilizer to remain healthy. Proper fertilization practices will lead to a thick, dark green, uniform lawn that is competitive against weed and disease invasions. The nutrients contained in fertilizers are necessary to support many processes occurring within the plants. If any essential nutrient is limiting, the plants will not perform at their highest level.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 425 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-214

Liming Kentucky Lawns

7/22/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Edwin Ritchey

Most homeowners desire an aesthetically pleasing landscape and will take steps to ensure success. Proper fertilizing, watering, and pest control are all steps that will lead to a quality lawn. However, some confusion surrounds when and why lime should be applied to a lawn. Many homeowners believe that lime needs to be applied on an annual basis for a quality lawn. The purpose of this publication is to explain why lime is needed and whether it is required on your lawn.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 909 kb
Pages: 4



ID-221

Fescue Toxicosis

7/3/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Cynthia Gaskill, Ray Smith

"Fescue toxicosis" is the general term used for the clinical diseases that can affect cattle consuming endophyte-infected tall fescue. Tall-fescue pastures containing ergot alkaloids are responsible for the toxic effects observed in livestock, including hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), gangrene of the extremities, decreased weight gain, and poor reproductive performance. Clinical signs vary depending on the cattle, the environmental conditions, and the level and duration of the exposure. Early clinical signs are often reversible after removal from contaminated pastures or hay.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 740 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-27

Cool-season Forage Grasses: Tall Fescue, Orchardgrass, Bluegrass, and Timothy

5/5/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Tall fescue, orchardgrass, bluegrass, and timothy are the dominant forage grasses in Kentucky. They have potential for the cash hay market and for intensive grazing. Significant price premiums may be possible for high-quality hay. Timothy hay, either alone or in mixtures with alfalfa, is much desired by horse owners. Historically, timothy has been an important seed crop in Kentucky; however, at present only a small acreage of timothy is grown for seed.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 410 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-213

Soybean Nutrient Management in Kentucky

4/24/2014 (new)
Authors: John Grove, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soybean grows best on fertile soils. For decades, the University of Kentucky has conducted field studies to establish the relationship between soil nutrient supplies and soybean yield. Adequate soil fertility must be present so that yields are not limited.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices, soybeans
Size: 1.02 mb
Pages: 5



ID-220

Cyanide Poisoning in Ruminants

4/21/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Cynthia Gaskill, Garry Lacefield, Ray Smith

Cyanide poisoning of livestock is commonly associated with johnsongrass, sorghum-sudangrass, and other forage sorghums. Choke-cherry or wild cherry, elderberry, and arrow grass are less frequent causes. Young plants, new shoots, and regrowth of plants after cutting often contain the highest levels of cyanogenic glycosides. The risk from potentially dangerous forages may be reduced by following the management practices in this publication.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 255 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-SP-10

Organic Certification Process

4/14/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Cheryl Kaiser

Growers who plan to market their agricultural products as "organic" or "certified organic" must first be certified by a USDA accredited certifier. Certification, required by federal regulation, provides third party verification that the grower is complying with production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). Annual inspections and detailed record keeping are required for continuing certification. These strict regulations are meant to protect consumers by ensuring that all organic producers are adhering to the same set of uniform standards.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, organic production, production practices
Size: 430 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-61

High Tunnel Strawberries

4/4/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels are relatively simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures placed over irrigated ground beds. Also known as hoop houses, high tunnels can be used to extend the production season of a wide variety of crops in Kentucky, including strawberries. A plasticulture system with drip irrigation is recommended when using high tunnels for strawberry production.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 528 kb
Pages: 4



ID-218

A Fresh Cow Health Monitoring System

4/2/2014 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Michelle Arnold, Jeffrey Bewley, Amanda Sterrett

Researchers at the University of Kentucky combined existing disease detection systems to produce a fresh cow examination system that may help producers detect diseases earlier by monitoring subtle changes every day during a cow's fresh period. Compiling daily information about each animal will enable producers to notice changes in health that may otherwise have been overlooked. These records may help producers detect illnesses early, thus reducing the long-term effects (reduced milk production or fertility) and costs (re-treatment, milk loss, or death) of a disease. Learning what diseases are common on a particular farm can focus producers' efforts towards preventive measures specific to their operation. Preventing disease, rather than treating, can save producers time and money and can improve overall cow well-being.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 15



VET-34

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Ergotism

3/31/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

Ergotism and fescue toxicosis are clinically similar syndromes caused by consuming plants containing ergot alkaloids. The toxic effects and mechanisms of action are similar in both syndromes although the alkaloids are produced by different species of fungi. It grows on rye, wheat, barley, triticale, oats, and various grasses. Rye and triticale are more susceptible than other grains because they require a longer period of pollination. Grasses potentially infected include tall fescue, bluegrass, brome, canarygrass, quackgrass, timothy, wild barley, and annual and perennial ryegrass. Shallow cultivation, no-till farming, and lack of crop rotation increase the likelihood of infection of crops. Environmental conditions of a cool, wet spring followed by hot early summer temperatures are ideal for the fungus to grow.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 400 kb
Pages: 2



PA-9

Technology to Improve Sprayer Accuracy

3/26/2014 (new)
Authors: Tim Stombaugh

A number of new technologies have been introduced over the last several years aimed at improving the accuracy of spray application, but do they really work? The purpose of this document is to highlight the most common causes of application errors then discuss the array of new sprayer technologies that are becoming available, how they might affect application accuracy, and pitfalls involved in using them.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 10



AGR-211

Calibrating Fertilizer Spreaders for the Home Lawn

3/25/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw

How much fertilizer should you use on your lawn? Too much can result in turf burn, wasted product and money, and potential environmental concerns. Too little will result in a low-density lawn that will not be attractive or competitive against weed invasions. To insure that you apply the proper amount of fertilizer to your lawn, you must calibrate your fertilizer spreader. You should calibrate your spreader each time you use a new (different) fertilizer because not all fertilizers have the same particle size or density. The information on the fertilizer bag is a good starting point for the calibration process but remember that spreaders can differ significantly. Calibrating your spreader will take a little bit of work, but the series of fairly simple steps below will help you complete the task.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 2.90 mb
Pages: 4



ASC-212

Stereotypic Behavior in Horses: Weaving, Stall Walking, and Cribbing

3/14/2014 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Many stabled horses perform a variety of repetitive behaviors such as weaving, stall walking, cribbing, headshaking and pawing. These behaviors have been called many different names including stereotypic behavior, stereotypies, stereotypes, obsessive compulsive disorders, vices and habits. Although it may be difficult to know why exactly each horse performs these vices, there may be specific causal factors for these activities in the horse. These behaviors are not simply learned and not simply inherited, but may be a mixture of both. Studies show that some families of horses have a higher prevalence of certain vices, which suggests heritability and genetic components. However, the tendency to perform the behavior only becomes apparent when other risk factors are also in place.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 480 kb
Pages: 2



HO-110

Sustainable Production Systems: Principles and Approaches for Optimizing Efficiency in Nursery and Landscape Businesses

3/14/2014 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Sarah Vanek

Publications in the Sustainable Production Systems series discuss ways of pursuing sustainability in nursery production systems. Sustainable businesses are those that yield acceptable returns on investments, conserve natural resources, make positive contributions to the community, and create a workplace culture where employees feel safe, productive, and valued.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, production practices, sustainabable agriculture
Size: 5.95 mb
Pages: 17



ID-217

Forage-Related Disorders in Cattle: Nitrate Poisoning

3/10/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Cynthia Gaskill, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Ray Smith

Few plants normally contain high nitrate levels, since under normal growing conditions the nitrates are converted to protein as quickly as they are absorbed from the roots. However, under certain conditions plants can develop dangerously high nitrate levels which can cause nitrate intoxication. Death or abortion may result. Care must be taken to recognize possible toxic forages and manage them appropriately to avoid animal loss.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 314 kb
Pages: 3



VET-33

Colostrum Management for Dairy Calves

1/22/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

During gestation, the placenta of the cow effectively separates the blood of the fetus from that of the dam and prevents any transfer of protective immunity while in the uterus. Therefore, the calf is born completely dependent on the absorption of maternal antibodies from colostrum after birth. Colostrum is the milk produced from the mammary gland in the first 24 hours after birth. A calf's gastrointestinal tract is designed to temporarily allow the absorption of large molecules including antibodies from the small intestine, but only during the first 24 hours after birth. Although colostrum contains several different types of immunoglobulins, IgG accounts for roughly 85 percent of the total volume. IgG absorption is most efficient in the first four hours of life and declines rapidly after 12 hours of age. At 24 hours, the gut is completely closed and there is no further immunoglobulin absorption. These absorbed antibodies must be consumed in order to protect the calf from disease organisms until its own immune system becomes functional.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 280 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-210

Fertilizer Management in Alfalfa

1/8/2014 (new)
Authors: David Ditsch, Lloyd Murdock, Edwin Ritchey, Greg Schwab

Alfalfa is a high quality, valuable forage crop that can be successfully produced on most well-drained soils in Kentucky for hay, silage, and grazing. Fertilizing alfalfa can be uniquely challenging because it is a high-yielding crop that removes a tremendous amount of soil nutrients when compared to other crops grown in Kentucky. A thorough understanding of alfalfa's growth habits, nutrient requirements, and soil nutrient supply mechanisms is necessary to effectively manage fertilizer inputs and maximize profitability while minimizing environmental impact.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, legumes, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 4 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-205

Selecting Feeds for Horses

1/6/2014 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Laurie Lawrence

Feeds should be selected with the nutrient requirements of the horse in mind, recognizing that requirements vary with the life stage of the horse (growing, pregnant, lactating, working, idle). Feeds for horses should always be clean and free from toxins. Feeds should also promote gastrointestinal health. The large intestine (cecum and colon) of the digestive tract contains a diverse population of beneficial microbes that can easily be upset by poor feed selection. In nature horses will spend more than 50% of their time grazing; therefore, feed that promotes similar feeding behavior may be desirable. Once appropriate feeds have been selected, it is important that they are fed in the correct amounts using good feeding management strategies.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.45 mb
Pages: 5



SR-106

Review of Life Cycles of Some Parasitic Nematodes in Mammals

10/28/2013 (new)
Authors: Gene Lyons

Most internal parasites of vertebrates require stages outside the host for development and transmission. Some life cycles are simple and straightforward. Others may have one or more intermediate or paritenic hosts. Knowledge of life cycles of parasites first of all is of great scientific interest. Secondly, life cycles are of great importance in controlling parasites. The object of this presentation is to review life cycles of some mammalian parasitic nematode species in research in association with the University of Kentucky.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 8



ID-166

On-Farm Composting of Animal Mortalities

5/6/2013 (minor revision)
Authors: Amanda A. Gumbert, Steve Higgins, Sarah Wightman

On-farm composting can provide animal producers with a convenient method for disposing of animal mortalities and also provide a valuable soil amendment. In addition, the finished compost can be stockpiled and reused to help compost other mortalities.

Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 2.80 mb
Pages: 6



ID-167

On-Farm Disposal of Animal Mortalities

5/6/2013 (minor revision)
Authors: Spencer Guinn, Amanda A. Gumbert, Steve Higgins

Animal mortalities are an expected part of animal production. Depending on the scale of the animal enterprise, animal mortalities can overwhelm the producer with a large number and mass of dead animals. This publication provides guidance to the producer for handling animal mortalities in accordance with Kentucky law.

Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 4



ID-214

Mulching with Large Round Bales between Plastic-covered Beds

4/26/2013 (new)
Authors: Tim Coolong, Tim Stombaugh, John Wilhoit

Large round bales lend themselves very well to the application of mulching rows of vegetables because the bales can be unrolled to peel off layers that are about the right thickness for mulch. An innovative implement that offsets the bale so that it can be unrolled between the rows while the tractor straddles the row can make the practice of mulching with round bales considerably more efficient.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, production practices
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 6



HO-109

Sustainable Production Systems: Efficient Wholesale Nursery Layout

1/31/2013 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Sarah Vanek

This publication provides the framework for planning and implementing efficient wholesale nursery layout. Concepts and ideas presented here are applicable to new construction or the modification of an existing nursery. A basic approach toward creating efficient systems will be discussed as well as common nursery activities that may require consideration during the planning stages. Functional areas will be defined, and a framework for understanding the relationships between these functional areas will be presented.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, fruits and nuts, production practices, sustainabable agriculture
Size: 4.00 mb
Pages: 10



ASC-191

How Much Will My Chickens Eat?

12/10/2012 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Before purchasing chicks (or chickens) it is important to consider the cost of keeping them. Much of this cost is in the feed they consume. So the key question is, "How much will my chickens eat?" Chickens need a complete feed that contains protein (with the right balance of amino acids), energy, vitamins, and minerals. Today we know more about the nutritional requirements of chickens than any other animal. The amount of feed they need will depend on several factors.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, poultry, production practices
Size: 320 kb
Pages: 3



ID-209

Management of the Dry Cow to Prevent Mastitis

11/30/2012 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeffrey Bewley

As we move into a new era of lower acceptable somatic cell count levels, the prevention and control of mastitis takes on increased importance. For many years, the contagious mastitis pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae and Mycoplasma bovis were the focus of control measures primarily implemented in the milking parlor to stop the spread of these organisms from cow to cow. These contagious organisms often cause high individual somatic cell counts and ultimately high bulk tank somatic cell counts. As these high somatic cell count cows have been culled due to milk marketing regulations and more dairymen have adopted NMC recommended milking procedures, the contagious pathogens are decreasing.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 430 kb
Pages: 3



ID-135

Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis ("Pinkeye") in Cattle

9/24/2012 (major revision)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, John Johns, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Patty Scharko

Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK), also known as pinkeye, is a costly disease for the beef producer. Tremendous losses stem from poor weight gain and loss of appetite in affected animals suffering from visual impairment and ocular pain.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 325 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-185

Feeding the Broodmare: Four Easy Steps

8/22/2012 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Laurie Lawrence

The nutritional needs of broodmares change as they go through the stages of reproduction. This publication begins with nutritional strategies to enhance the likelihood a mare will become pregnant, then it discusses feeding management of the mare during pregnancy and lactation, and it ends with some nutritional considerations for the post-weaning period.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.75 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-SP-2

High Tunnel Overview

6/12/2012 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels, also known as hoop houses, are relatively simple polyethylene-covered greenhouse-like structures built over ground beds. High tunnels can be used to extend the production season and marketing window of a wide variety of crops. They have been used in Kentucky to produce early season vegetables, cut flowers, brambles, and strawberries. High tunnels can also make it possible to produce leafy greens and herbs during the winter. Shaded, well-vented high tunnels can be used to grow some cool-season crops later into early summer.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 963 kb
Pages: 7



HO-100

Organic Gardening: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 18

5/7/2012 (new)
Authors: Krista Jacobsen

Organic gardening offers the gardener many benefits--a safe, low-chemical gardening environment, produce free from synthetic pesticide residues, and gardens that can increase in fertility and natural pest control over time. However, reaping the benefits of organic management requires planning, observation, and thinking about the garden as an interconnected system of soils, plants, pests, and beneficial organisms.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, organic production, production practices
Size: 615 kb
Pages: 12



SR-2000-1

A Practical Method of Identification of the North American Cyathostomes (Small Strongyles) in Equids in Kentucky

5/3/2012 (major revision)
Authors: Sharon Tolliver

Now that veterinarians and researchers are beginning to accept the pathological consequences that can be caused by cyathostomes (small strongyles), more and more researchers want to learn to identify them. Fortunately, for those just learning, the reality is that they will probably see fewer than one-third of the 33 species. Additionally, these species are the most prevalent and in the greatest numbers; consequently, they are the most dangerous to equids. Once a person is familiar with these, a rare species will "stick out like a sore thumb." The fact that a species is so different will be noted and its characteristics easily remembered.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 3 kb
Pages: 44



ASC-187

Help! My Horse is Too Fat!

4/19/2012 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Bob Coleman, Laurie Lawrence

As we understand more about the impact that obesity has on animal health, it is imperative that we strive to keep our horses at an optimum body condition.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 413 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-186

Distillers Grain Coproducts for Beef Cattle

12/5/2011 (new)
Authors: Roy Burris, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Feeding distillers grains derived from the production of spirits or ethanol for fuel is an acceptable practice for beef cattle production. The use of these products as both an energy and a protein supplement has been beneficial as the cereal grain prices have increased making these coproducts more cost competitive.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, small grains
Size: 231 kb
Pages: 4



ID-197

Equine Viral Arteritis

11/14/2011 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Amy Lawyer, Peter Timony

Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is a contagious disease of horses and other equine species caused by equine arteritis virus (EAV) that is found in horse populations in many countries. It was first isolated and identified in 1953 from the lung of an aborted fetus with characteristic pathologic changes in the smaller arteries, which is how the disease got its name.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 270 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-204

Soils and Fertility: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 4

10/12/2011 (new)
Authors: Brad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soil is a mixture of weathered rock fragments and organic matter at the earth's surface. It is biologically active--a home to countless microorganisms, invertebrates, and plant roots. Soil provides nutrients, water, and physical support for plants as well as air for plant roots. Soil organisms are nature's primary recyclers, turning dead cells and tissue into nutrients, energy, carbon dioxide, and water to fuel new life.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 24



AEN-107

Paved Feeding Areas and the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan

7/28/2011 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Sarah Wightman

Kentucky's abundant forage makes it well suited for grazing livestock. Livestock producers can make additional profits by adding a few pounds before marketing calves; however, adding those pounds requires keeping calves during the winter months, when pasture forages are dormant and supplemental feed is required. The areas used to winter calves need to be conducive to feeding and need to avoid negatively impacting the environment, especially water quality.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 260 kb
Pages: 5



ASC-184

Preventing Barn Fire: Tips for Horse Owners

6/2/2011 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Every year, close to 200 horses are reported to have died in barn fires in the United States. Although less frequent than house fires, barn fires are more common than we would like. Many barn fires could be prevented by good barn design/construction, strict personnel policies, and clear directives about how the barn and equipment should be maintained.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-SP-1

Greenhouse Structures

5/25/2011 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

A greenhouse is a "tool" that can be used to facilitate the growing of plants. Generally, the tool is fitted for the job, and not the other way around. Growers need to determine what plants will be produced before making a decision about the type of greenhouse needed to accomplish the job. Depending on the crops to be grown, a conventional greenhouse may not even be needed. Instead, a simpler structure could more economically extend the growing season into spring and fall. For example, if the primary target is an early start date for farmers markets, row covers or a high tunnel may be quite adequate to handle the job.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: crops and plants, equipment and structures, greenhouse, production practices
Size: 807 kb
Pages: 5



ASC-128

Colic in Horses

5/18/2011 (major revision)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Among the species of domestic livestock, the horse is the species that most commonly suffers from colic, which is a general term for abdominal pain. Colic is one of the leading causes of death in horses and should be of concern for horse owners.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 200 kb
Pages: 2



ID-186

Managing Legume Induced Bloat in Cattle

3/10/2011 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Roy Burris, David Ditsch, Garry Lacefield, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Ruminal tympany, or bloat, can result in lost animal performance and in severe cases, death. It occurs as a result of a buildup of fermentation gases in the rumen. Bloat may be categorized as frothy bloat, which is caused by the formation of a stable foam in the rumen, or free gas bloat, which is due to excessive production of gaseous compounds from fermentation or as a result of an obstruction preventing the escape of gas compounds. Legume bloat is a frothy bloat condition.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 400 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-181

Equine Infectious Anemia

3/4/2011 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, lethargy, inappetence (lack of appetite) and anemia (low red blood cell count).

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 169 kb
Pages: 2



ID-74

Planning Fencing Systems for Intensive Grazing Management

2/16/2011 (reprinted)
Authors: Curtis Absher, Ken Evans, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 646 kb
Pages: 12



CCD-CP-37

Organic Corn for Feed or Food

2/14/2011 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Organic white and yellow food grade corn is produced for use in organic cereals, tortillas, corn chips, snack foods, cornmeal, and other corn-based processed products. Organic corn is also used as animal feed in organic beef, dairy, poultry, and hog production

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: alternative practices, corn, crops and plants, farm crops, food crops, grain crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 467 kb
Pages: 6



ASC-180

Anthrax in Horses

10/7/2010 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Horses become infected with anthrax either through ingestion, inhalation or skin penetration by biting flies or injury, especially when animals are exposed to soil or carcasses of infected animals.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 210 kb
Pages: 2



ID-147

Establishing Horse Pastures

9/20/2010 (major revision)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Garry Lacefield, Laurie Lawrence, Laura Schwer, Ray Smith, Bill Witt

Kentucky and surrounding states are known for grass pastures and horses. Pastures supply nutrients, provide hoof support for exercise, control erosion, and add to the aesthetic value of horse farms. The ability to establish and manage horse pastures is therefore important to horse owners.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 207 kb
Pages: 4



ID-182

Wobbler Syndrome in Horses

9/13/2010 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Jennifer Janes

Wobbler syndrome, or cervical vertebral malformation (CVM), is a devastating disease that can affect a horse's neurologic and musculoskeletal systems. It is a structural narrowing of the spinal canal due to a variety of vertebral malformations and leads to spinal cord compression. As a result, horses exhibit clinical signs of spasticity, ataxia, and lack of coordination.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 167 kb
Pages: 2



ASC-125

Rabies in Horses

6/15/2010 (major revision)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Rabies in the horse is a relatively uncommon disease. Although the number of confirmed rabies cases in horses is low, the potential for human exposure makes it important to discuss the causes of rabies and its diagnosis, treatment, and control. It is noteworthy that the American Association of Equine Practitioners and the American Veterinary Medical Association include rabies as one of the diseases for which horses should be vaccinated every year.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 170 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-185

Nitrogen Transformation Inhibitors and Controlled-Release Urea

4/21/2010 (major revision)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab

The soaring cost of fossil fuels is an indicator that nitrogen fertilizer prices are going to remain high for the foreseeable future. With higher N prices, many producers are trying to evaluate the usefulness of several N additive products in their production systems. High N prices make these products more attractive because it takes fewer pounds of saved N to offset the price of the additive. Producers should have a good understanding of how these products work in order to make informed decisions regarding their use.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 500 kb
Pages: 6



ID-179

Evaluating the Health of Your Horse

2/5/2010 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Roberta Dwyer

Horse owners, managers, and handlers can help to maintain the health of their animals by studying their behavior through observation and inspection, and should be able to accurately determine important measurements such as temperature, pulse, respiration, and mucous membrane color through a clinical examination. Having this information about your horse can be critical if the animal is ill or injured and you need to supply these details to your veterinarian.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 373 kb
Pages: 6



SR-102

Some Historic Aspects of Small Strongyles and Ascarids in Equids Featuring Drug-Resistance with Notes on Ovids: Emphasis on Research at the Unversity of Kentucky

3/13/2009 (new)
Authors: Gene Lyons, Sharon Tolliver

The present bulletin focuses mainly on drug-resistant species (small strongyles and ascarids) of internal parasites of the horse with emphasis on historic research. Some discussion is presented also of research at UK on the sheep "barber pole" stomach worm (Haemonchus contortus) which has a historic role in drug resistance.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 249 kb
Pages: 12



AGR-145

Warm Season Perennial Grasses for Forages in Kentucky

3/10/2009 (minor revision)
Authors: Tom Keene, Garry Lacefield, Ray Smith

Native warm-season perennial grasses are well adapted for production in Kentucky's climate and soils. In this publication, native warm-season perennial grasses that have the greatest forage potential for Kentucky are described. Management techniques necessary to establish stands and keep them productive are also discussed.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1.64 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-198

Sulfur Fertilization in Kentucky

10/23/2008 (new)
Authors: Greg Schwab

There are a lot of misunderstandings regarding sulfur (S) nutrition for Kentucky crops. Sulfur is considered a seconda r y pla nt nutrient because, although the crop requirement for S is relatively large, it is usually found in soil at concentrations adequate for plant growth and yield so that no fertilizer S is needed. For many years, soil S was maintained by atmospheric deposition. However, more stringent clean air standards require greater removal of S during burning of fossil fuels. That fact, along with increasing crop yields, has caused many Kentucky grain producers to begin to question if S fertilization will increase yield.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-176

Core Vaccination Program and Infectious Disease Control for Horses

9/19/2008 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 240 kb
Pages: 6



ASC-173

Botulism: A Deadly Disease That Can Affect Your Horse

3/28/2008 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Bob Coleman, Laurie Lawrence

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 192 kb
Pages: 4



ID-170

Drinking Water Quality Guidelines for Cattle

3/26/2008 (new)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Amanda A. Gumbert, Steve Higgins

Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-172

Heaves in Horses

1/31/2008 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo, Bob Coleman, Kristen Harvey, Laurie Lawrence, Mary Rossano

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 531 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-16

Taking Soil Test Samples

9/4/2007 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab, Frank Sikora, Bill Thom

The most important part of making fertilizer recommendations is collecting a good, representative soil sample. Soil test results and fertilizer recommendations are based solely on the few ounces of soil submitted to the laboratory for analysis. These few ounces can represent several million pounds of soil in the field. If this sample does not reflect actual soil conditions, the results can be misleading and lead to costly over- or under-fertilization. It is necessary to make sure that the soil sample sent to the laboratory accurately represents the area sampled.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 150 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-190

Chicory: an Alternative Livestock Forage

1/26/2007 (new)
Authors: David Ditsch, Brandon Sears

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 143 kb
Pages: 2



ASC-136

Using Byproducts to Feed Dairy Cattle

8/30/2006 (minor revision)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Roger Hemken

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 158 kb
Pages: 8



ASC-161

Feeding and Managing Baby Calves from Birth to 3 Months of Age

8/30/2006 (minor revision)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, John Johns, Patty Scharko

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 172 kb
Pages: 6



ID-158

Managing Steep Terrain for Livestock Forage Production

8/30/2006 (new)
Authors: Bob Coleman, David Ditsch, J.D. Green, Terry Hutchens, John Johns, Larry Piercy, Greg Schwab

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 417 kb
Pages: 12



VET-1

Controlling Internal Parasites of the Horse

4/15/2006 (minor revision)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Harold Drudge, Gene Lyons, Sharon Tolliver, William Wise

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 662 kb
Pages: 16



VET-32

Tapeworms in Horses

4/15/2006 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Collins, Harold Drudge, Gene Lyons, Sharon Tolliver

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 430 kb
Pages: 8



ID-157

Managing Livestock Forage for Beef Cattle Production on Reclaimed Surface-Mined Land

1/20/2006 (new)
Authors: David Ditsch, John Johns

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 477 kb
Pages: 8



HO-75

Home Composting: A Guide to Managing Organic Wastes

11/1/2005 (minor revision)
Authors: Bill Fountain

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, organic production, production practices
Size: 263 kb
Pages: 4



PA-7

Implementing Precision Agriculture: Connecting a GPS to Other Devices

7/8/2005 (new)
Authors: Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 153 kb
Pages: 2



ID-154

Low-Maintenance Lawn Care, Stressing Pest Avoidance and Organic Inputs

3/15/2005 (reprinted)
Authors: Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Paul Vincelli, David Williams

This publication is written for those who wish to maintain their lawn with minimal inputs. Low-maintenance lawn care offers certain benefits, such as minimal pesticide use, reduced fertilizer input, less need for irrigation, and reduced mowing frequency. However, when choosing a low-maintenance approach, recognize that the lawn will not offer the same dark green, uniform sward of turf that is seen under a high-maintenance lawn-care program.

Departments: Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: alternative practices, crops and plants, organic production, production practices
Size: 176 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-180

Corn Stalk Nitrate Test

8/27/2004 (new)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 136 kb
Pages: 2



ID-152

Grazing Corn: an Option for Extending the Grazing Season in Kentucky

7/15/2004 (reprinted)
Authors: David Ditsch, Steve Isaacs, John Johns, Chad Lee

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 266 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-155

Trace Mineral Supplementation for Kentucky Beef Cows

11/15/2003 (new)
Authors: Roger Hemken, John Johns, Patty Scharko

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 96 kb
Pages: 4



PA-6

Implementing Precision Agriculture: What Will This Investment Cost?

11/15/2003 (new)
Authors: Scott Shearer, Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 106 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-134

Kentucky Bluegrass as a Forage Crop

11/1/2003 (minor revision)
Authors: Garry Lacefield, Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 13 kb
Pages:



SR-2003-1

Proceedings, First Workshop on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

4/28/2003 (new)
Authors: David Powell

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 1 kb
Pages: 1



ASC-162

Managing Body Condition to Improve Reproductive Efficiency in Beef Cows

2/1/2003 (reprinted)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Roy Burris, John Johns

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 158 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-106

Determining the Quality of Aglime: Relative Neutralizing Value (RNV)

12/4/2002 (minor revision)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Monroe Rasnake, Greg Schwab, Bill Thom

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 90 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-90

Inoculation of Forage Legumes

11/22/2002 (minor revision)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Garry Lacefield, Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, legumes, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 110 kb
Pages: 2



PA-1

Elements of PrecIsion Agriculture: Basics of Yield Monitor Installation and Operation

10/10/2002 (reprinted)
Authors: J.P. Fulton, Steve Higgins, Sam McNeill, Tom Mueller, Scott Shearer, Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 234 kb
Pages: 10



AGR-165

The Agronomics of Manure Use for Crop Production

9/20/2002 (minor revision)
Authors: Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: animals, crops and plants, farm crops, production practices, waste management
Size: 187 kb
Pages: 4



PA-5

Elements of Precision Agriculture: GPS Simplified

6/30/2002 (new)
Authors: Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 38 kb
Pages: 2



PA-4

Implementing Precision Agriculture: Choosing the Right Lightbar

6/15/2002 (new)
Authors: Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 114 kb
Pages: 2



PA-3

Elements of Precision Agriculture: Lightbar Guidance Aids

6/12/2002 (new)
Authors: Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 36 kb
Pages: 2



ID-141A

Feeding Your Dairy Cows a Total Mixed Ration: Getting Started

12/15/2001 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Jose Bicudo, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 55 kb
Pages: 4



ID-141B

Managing the Total Mixed Ration to Prevent Problems in Dairy Cows

12/15/2001 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Jose Bicudo, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 93 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-160

Planning the Yearly Forage and Commodity Needs for a Dairy Herd

8/30/2001 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Jack McAllister

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 8



PA-2

Guidelines for Adopting Precision Agricultural Practices

5/15/2001 (new)
Authors: Carl Dillon, Greg Henson, Tom Mueller, Scott Shearer, Tim Stombaugh

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, County Extension, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Precision Agriculture (PA series)
Tags:
Size: 85 kb
Pages: 4



ID-144

Understanding Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue and Its Effect on Broodmares

5/1/2001 (reprinted)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Jimmy Henning, Garry Lacefield, Laurie Lawrence

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 362 kb
Pages: 2



ID-145

Alfalfa Cubes for Horses

5/1/2001 (reprinted)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, horses, legumes, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 310 kb
Pages: 2



ID-146

Choosing Hay for Horses

5/1/2001 (reprinted)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 397 kb
Pages: 4



ID-72

Principles of Home Landscape Fertilizing

3/1/2001 (minor revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, John Hartman, A.J. Powell, Bill Thom

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 183 kb
Pages: 6



ASC-159

Selection and Management Practices to Increase Consistency in Beef Cattle

9/30/2000 (new)
Authors: Darrh Bullock

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 78 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-146

Using Animal Manures as Nutrient Sources

8/1/2000 (minor revision)
Authors: Monroe Rasnake, Frank Sikora, Bill Thom

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 330 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-158

Assessing Sow Body Condition

10/31/1999 (new)
Authors: Richard Coffey, Kevin Laurent, Gary Parker

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, swine
Size: 257 kb
Pages: 2



IP-57

Potential for Livestock and Poultry Manure to Provide the Nutrients Removed by Crops and Forages in Kentucky

9/8/1999 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Jenny Cocanougher, Richard Coffey, Bill Crist, Ron Fleming, Kim Henken, Doug Overhults, Tony Pescatore, Monroe Rasnake, Bill Thom

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interprogram (IP series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 641 kb
Pages: 6



ASC-156

Feeding and Managing the Far-Off Dry Cow

9/1/1999 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 294 kb
Pages: 4



IP-56

Assessment of the Potential for Livestock and Poultry Manure to Provide the Nutrients Removed by Crops and Forages in Kentucky

9/1/1999 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Jenny Cocanougher, Richard Coffey, Bill Crist, Ron Fleming, Kim Henken, Doug Overhults, Tony Pescatore, Monroe Rasnake, Bill Thom

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interprogram (IP series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 794 kb
Pages: 18



ASC-154

Using Nutrition to Improve Immunity Against Disease: Copper, Zinc, Selenium, and Vitamin E

5/1/1999 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Bob Harmon

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 114 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-140

Mastitis and Its Control

7/11/1997 (minor revision)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Bill Crist, Bob Harmon, George Heersche, Jack McAllister, Joe O'Leary, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 79 kb
Pages: 14



ASC-151

Pasture for Dairy Cattle: Challenges and Opportunities

4/1/1997 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Roger Hemken, Jimmy Henning, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 184 kb
Pages: 8



ASC-131

Using the Dart Ration Computer Program to Answer Nutrition Questions About Dairy Cattle

9/15/1996 (minor revision)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 210 kb
Pages: 18



AGR-5

When to Apply Lime and Fertilizer

9/1/1996 (minor revision)
Authors: Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 143 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-168

Broiler Litter Production in Kentucky and Potential Use as a Nutrient Source

7/1/1996 (new)
Authors: Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 66 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-163

Selecting the Right Fertilizer for Tobacco Production in Float Systems

2/1/1996 (new)
Authors: Gary Palmer, Bob Pearce

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 180 kb
Pages: 2



ASC-147

Feeding Growing-Finishing Pigs to Maximize Lean Growth Rate

8/31/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Richard Coffey, Kevin Laurent, Gary Parker

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, swine
Size: 96 kb
Pages: 8



ASC-149

Feeding and Managing the Weanling Pig

8/1/1995 (new)
Authors: Richard Coffey, Kevin Laurent, Gary Parker

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices, swine
Size: 67 kb
Pages: 8



ASC-143

Equine Feeding Management

4/1/1995 (new)
Authors: Laurie Lawrence

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 146 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-103

Fertilization of Cool-Season Grasses

3/5/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Charles Dougherty, Lloyd Murdock, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, crops and plants, farm crops, grasses, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 16 kb
Pages:



AGR-151

Evaluating Fertilizer Recommendations

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 236 kb
Pages: 5



AGR-19

Liming Acid Soils

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 10 kb
Pages:



AGR-43

Nitrogen in Kentucky Soils

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: J.L. Sims, Scott Smith, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 290 kb
Pages: 8



VET-31

A Health Calendar for Spring-Calving Herds

11/1/1993 (new)
Authors: Duane Miksch

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 89 kb
Pages:



VET-30

Club Lamb Fungus Disease

5/1/1993 (new)
Authors: Duane Miksch

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 37 kb
Pages:



ASC-129

Sheep Foot Care and Diseases

4/1/1993 (reprinted)
Authors: Monte Chappell

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 24 kb
Pages:



ASC-138

Role of Nutrition on Reproductive Performance

10/1/1992 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, George Heersche

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 191 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-134

Should You Be Feeding Fat to Your Dairy Cows?

8/1/1992 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Roger Hemken, Jack Jackson

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, dairy cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 189 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-139

Balancing Rations for Dairy Cows

8/1/1992 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 23 kb
Pages:



FOR-24

Kentucky Christmas Tree Production Workbook Fertilization

9/27/1991 (reprinted)
Authors: Bonnie Appleton, Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 5 kb
Pages:



ASC-12

Balancing Rations

5/31/1991 (minor revision)
Authors: Roy Burris, Nelson Gay, John Johns, Dave Patterson

Because feed costs are the major cost of producing beef, making the most efficient use of feeds is of prime importance in determining profits. Rations must be properly balanced for cattle to use feeds most efficiently. Ration balancing is another management tool the efficient producer can use to maximize profits.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 32 kb
Pages:



VET-28

Preventing and Treating Disease in Exhibition Market Animals

8/1/1990 (new)
Authors: Duane Miksch

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 30 kb
Pages:



VET-27

Chemical and Drug Residues in Livestock

10/1/1989 (new)
Authors: Duane Miksch

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 34 kb
Pages:



ASC-120

Forages for Horses

5/1/1989 (new)
Authors: Charles Dougherty, Craig Wood

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 201 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-119

Economical Alternative Feeds for Sheep

4/1/1989 (new)
Authors: Monte Chappell, Don Ely

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 24 kb
Pages:



ASC-114

Basic Horse Nutrition

7/1/1988 (new)
Authors: Stephen Jackson, Craig Wood

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 243 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-49

Liming and Fertilizing Burley Tobacco

4/1/1987 (new)
Authors: J.L. Sims, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 33 kb
Pages:



ID-76

Creep Grazing for Beef Calves

4/1/1987 (new)
Authors: Curtis Absher, Larry Turner

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 11 kb
Pages:



ID-13

Beef Cattle Corrals and Handling Facilities

4/1/1986 (reprinted)
Authors: Curtis Absher, Roy Burris, Sam McNeill, Larry Turner

Proven management practices such as castrating, dehorning, pregnancy examination, controlling parasites, implanting, vaccinating, etc. are essential if profits are to be realized in beef herds. Although most practices are relatively simple, they cannot be done easily without some type of restraining equipment which will prevent injury to both man and animal. The absence of cattle handling facilities probably contributes more than anything else to failure to perform these money-making procedures.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 17 kb
Pages:



ASC-104

Factors Affecting Feed Conversion in Growing-Finishing Swine

9/1/1985 (new)
Authors: Gary Cromwell, Dennis Liptrap, Gary Parker

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 23 kb
Pages:



ASC-106

Improving Preweaning Survival of Pigs

6/1/1985 (new)
Authors: Gary Cromwell, Dennis Liptrap, Gary Parker

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 9 kb
Pages:



VET-26

Brucellosis of Cattle

3/1/1985 (reprinted)
Authors: D.E. LaBore

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 37 kb
Pages:



AGR-105

Fertilization and Liming for Corn

2/1/1983 (new)
Authors: Scott Smith, Scott Smith, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, crops and plants, farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 21 kb
Pages:



AGR-23

Tobacco Stalks and Stems Fertility Value and Use

5/1/1979 (reprinted)
Authors: W.O. Atkinson, Jones Smiley

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 6 kb
Pages:



AGR-11

Potassium in Kentucky Soils

2/1/1979 (new)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: crops and plants, nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 24 kb
Pages:



VET-10

E.I.A. Equine Infectious Anemia

1/1/1973 (new)
Authors: Charles Issel

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: animals, horses, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 107 kb
Pages: 2



ID-2

Some Plants of Kentucky Poisonous to Livestock

6/1/1972 (minor revision)
Authors: J.W. Herron

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: animals, nutrition and health, production practices
Size: 59 kb
Pages: