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production practices


HO-89

Characteristics of Kentucky's Nursery and Greenhouse Industries, 2020

10/5/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram

The purpose of this publication is to characterize Kentucky's nursery and greenhouse industry in relation to the national and re-gional industry by gleaning information from the national surveys conducted by the Green Industry Research Consortium for 2018, 2013, 2008, and 2003. The survey data will be augmented by information obtained from the experiences of the authors and from conversations with nursery owners. Information is presented relative to employment, plant types sold, product types, markets and marketing channels, sales methods and marketing practices, advertising expenditures, integrated pest management practices, water sources, and irrigation methods.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: equipment and structures, greenhouse, production practices
Size: 569 kb
Pages: 11



AEN-152

Building a Hoop Barn

7/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Hoop barns are a cost-effective alternative to pole barns. For example, a farmer might choose a hoop barn when deciding to expand hay sales, or for providing cover for costly equipment. Hoop barns have the additional benefit of being a construction project that can be done by the farmer (and a group of friends), which can provide an additional cost savings. This publication goes through the steps involved by following the construction of two hoop barns built by a local farmer. In this case, hoop barns were built to increase the farm's hay storage capacity.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 8.14 mb
Pages: 14



PPFS-GEN-17

Cleaning and Disinfecting Home Garden Tools and Equipment

6/26/2020 (new)
Authors: Kara Back, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Kimberly Leonberger

Dirty tools, containers, and surfaces come as no surprise to home gardeners (Figure 1). Rinsing with water to remove obvious soil or plant residues is a common practice. However, this type of basic cleaning can fail to remove microscopic plant pathogens that can remain on surfaces. Tools, containers, shoes, and surfaces should also be disinfected to remove fungal, bacterial, and viral plant pathogens to prevent transmission to healthy plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology, Taylor County
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases, production practices
Size: 707 kb
Pages: 4



ID-261

Are Common Stall Fans Effective? Orientation, Placement, and Fan Style

5/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Morgan Hayes, Staci McGill, Kimberly Tumlin

During summer months, horse owners hang fans around their barn and stalls in an effort to increase air movement to reduce temperature and flies in stall areas. These fans typically are 20-inch 3-speed box fans or 20-inch high velocity mounted fans. Both fans are easy to find at any home improvement or big box store and are ready to use with little to no assembly. But are these commonly used fans really serving these intended purposes?

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Epidemiology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 702 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-1

Lime and Fertilizer Recommendations, 2020-2021

3/18/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Josh McGrath, Edwin Ritchey

Recommended nutrient additions, based on a soil test, are only made when a crop yield or economic response has been measured for that crop under Kentucky soil-climatic conditions. Many field studies have been conducted by the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station under Kentucky farm conditions to determine the extent of any primary, secondary, or micronutrient needs. Yield and soil test data from these studies serve as guidelines for establishing recommendations contained in this publication. Recommendations in this publication strive to supply the plant nutrients needed to achieve maximum economic return assuming good management practices.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 1.44 mb
Pages: 29



AEN-147

Structures for Beef Cattle

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Livestock housing, whether simple or sophisticated, must perform the required functions. It should meet the thermal and physical needs of the animal; it should provide a place to store and feed materials without damage or loss; it should increase the performance of cattle; and, it should allow the producer to conduct all chores associated with cattle production efficiently. A building can contribute to management efficiency and animal performance, which itself is defined by productivity, health and welfare. The building should create optimum environmental conditions for cattle by providing light, air flow, appropriate flooring, space, and ventilation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 956 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-245

Nitrogen for Kentucky Turfgrasses

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is required by turfgrass in larger quantities than any other mineral nutrient because the plant demand for N is high and the supply of N from the natural environment is normally low. In instances where N is not applied according to the University of Kentucky recommendations, applied N can increase the risk of surface and ground water contamination. The objective of this document is to describe the function of N in turfgrass, explain how soil and tissue tests can be used to manage N applications, and to describe the various N fertilizer sources available for application to turfgrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 168 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-145

Designing or Reworking Your Cattle-handling Facilities: A Checklist for Success

2/3/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Cattle-handling facilities should be designed to match the management goals of the operation. The safety of workers and cattle should be the highest priority when designing or reworking a handling facility. A well-designed facility will make working cattle faster, safer, less labor intensive, and less frustrating.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-246

Iron for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/20/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Iron (Fe) is commonly applied using granular or foliar sources to enhance turfgrass color. Iron applications can result in darker green turfgrass as a result of increased Fe uptake or Fe oxidation on the leaf surface. In many cases, Fe results in no turfgrass response at all. Understanding the dynamics of Fe both in the plant and in the soil can enhance your nutrient management programs. The objective of this publication is to explain the function of Fe within the plant, describe the Fe sources available for turfgrasses, and identify which Fe fertilizers are most effective.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 1.78 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-242

Calcium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Calcium (Ca) is the dominant cation in all soils of agronomic importance and Kentucky soils are no different. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Ca. Consequently, Ca deficiency in Kentucky turfgrasses is extremely rare, and the probability of observing a Ca response on golf courses, home lawns, sod production, or sports fields is very low. Applying Ca fertilizers to artificially increase soil Ca above the level necessary for proper plant growth normally does not result in an increase in plant uptake because Ca uptake is genetically controlled. Regardless, Ca is commonly applied in both granular and liquid forms.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 112 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-243

Magnesium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Magnesium is an essential element for all plants. Soluble magnesium (Mg) exists in soils primarily as Mg2+, a positively charged divalent cation. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Mg and, thus, Mg applications to turfgrass are normally unnecessary. However, turfgrasses grown in sand-based rootzones, such as golf course putting greens and sand-based sports fields, are prone to Mg deficiency. When Mg is necessary, it is essential to understand the function of Mg in the plant, the dynamics of Mg in the soil, and the forms of Mg fertilizers.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 826 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-244

Phosphorus for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Brad Lee, Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Phosphorus (P) is an essential plant nutrient and a common component of many turfgrass nutrition programs. Although P application can improve turfgrass quality in some soils, most soils of Kentucky already have adequate plant-available P to support healthy turfgrass growth. What is the function of P within the plant, and how much P is required to sustain acceptable turfgrass in Kentucky? Also, if P applications are necessary, when and how should P be applied?

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 481 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-144

Four Beef Cattle Barn Flooring Options: A Case Study

11/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Barn floor design is critical to the physical and thermal comfort, health and safety of cattle. Generally speaking, barn flooring is the surface on which an animal stands, lies down, and excretes its urine and manure. Therefore, to meet animal needs, it must be durable, not slippery, and well drained, as well as comfortable, warm, and dry. In addition to providing animal comfort, the flooring should easily be cleaned. No single material, from concrete to soil, meets all of these specifications.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 3.55 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-6

Chemical Control of Weeds in Kentucky Grain Crops, 2020

11/7/2019 (major revision)
Authors: J.D. Green, Travis Legleiter

The use of herbicides suggested in this publication is based on research at the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station and elsewhere. We have given what we believe to be the most effective herbicides, with the most suitable rates and times of application. Smaller files are available here.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, production practices, small grains, soybeans, weeds
Size: 2.25 mb
Pages: 140



PPFS-FR-S-24

Backyard Grape Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.21 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-S-25

Backyard Berry Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.04 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-21

Backyard Apple and Pear Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.01 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-22

Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 890 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-141

Maps for Farm Planning

6/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Planning and design are critical steps when modernizing a farm to meet the current and future operational needs. Farm renovations and redevelopment must always consider the cost/benefit of changes, while staying consistent with good agricultural practice guidelines that conserve labor and the resources of the farm. The process of developing a farm map will be used to guide producers on the concepts and considerations necessary to make decisions related to planning renovations and developing new infrastructure on the farm.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.32 mb
Pages: 4



HO-122

Go with the Flow: Simple Calculations for Drip Irrigation

5/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Brent Rowell

While drip irrigation is relatively easy, information about drip irrigation is often more complicated and confusing than it needs to be. Well-meaning professors and engineers use terms like "head" and "flow rate" without explaining exactly what they mean and how they are used. And it's often difficult to get help planning a small farm system in states without large irrigated acreages and irrigation traditions. The purpose of this bulletin is to help farmers understand the simple calculations involved in designing a small drip irrigation system.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 6



PPFS-VG-19

Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 995 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-20

Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 896 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-21

Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 874 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-22

Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 460 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-23

Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 788 kb
Pages: 2



ID-235

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky

10/17/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, John Obrycki, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, Shubin Saha, Shawn Wright

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, nursery and landscape, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-57

Greenhouse Tomatoes

6/12/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Greenhouse tomato production has increased in recent years, responding to consumer demand for year-round fresh produce and advances in greenhouse vegetable production practices. However, of all the greenhouse crops, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are the most complicated to grow because they require the most management, the most labor, and the most light. A grower must be committed to meeting the daily demands of production to be successful. Prospective growers need to get as much information as they can about all aspects of greenhouse production before beginning this enterprise.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, greenhouse, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



HO-120

Off the Grid: Ultra-Low Pressure Drip Irrigation and Rainwater Catchment for Small Plots and High Tunnels

1/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Krista Jacobsen, Brent Rowell

All forms of irrigation need a push or pressure to move water from its source to its destination. Water sources include wells, springs, lakes, creeks, canals, rivers, cisterns, elevated tanks, or municipal water supplies. The amount of pressure or push required depends on many things including the height water must be lifted, length and size of the delivery pipe(s), crop and size of the area to be irrigated, and the distance water needs to be moved from the source to the field, greenhouse, or tunnel.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: equipment and structures, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 9.42 mb
Pages: 12



ID-149

2017 Kentucky Blackberry Cost and Return Estimates

10/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, John Strang, Tim Woods, Shawn Wright

Potential producers should realize that while thornless semi-erect varieties produce superior economic returns, thorny and thornless erect varieties may hold some marketing advantages that can command superior prices and result in better returns than those estimated using these standard assumptions.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: business and records, farm crops, fruits and nuts, production practices
Size: 265 kb
Pages: 20



PPFS-AG-C-5

Diplodia Ear Rot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Diplodia ear rot can reduce yield and grain quality by damaging kernels, lowering grain test weight, and reducing grain fill. Incidence of affected ears in the field can vary from 1% or 2% to as high as 80%. Although mycotoxins have been associated with Diplodia ear rot in South America and South Africa, there have been no reports of livestock feeding issues due to mycotoxins linked to Diplodia ear rot in the United States.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 990 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-C-6

Holcus Leaf Spot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Holcus leaf spot, a bacterial disease, can be seen sporadically in Kentucky cornfields, and it is challenging to diagnose. This publication describes the disease symptoms, conditions that favor disease, and how to distinguish holcus spot from herbicide injury that can mimic this disease.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 889 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-62

High Tunnel Tomatoes

9/5/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels, also known as hoop houses, are simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures that typically do not use fans for ventilation. Tunnels can be covered with one or two sheets of plastic; those covered with two have an air layer in between, thus offering better insulation and, consequently, more cold protection (and wind protection). High tunnels are used to extend the growing season earlier into spring and later into fall. Determinate and indeterminate tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) can be successfully grown in this production system, yielding a potentially profitable "out of season."

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-FS-6

Three-Year Average Prices and Quantities at Kentucky Produce Auctions: 2014-2016

8/15/2017 (new)
Authors: Martin Bechu, Alex Butler, Brett Wolff, Tim Woods

This report compares average volumes and prices for 18 crops from two major Kentucky produce auctions for the 2014, 2015, and 2016 seasons.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags: business and records, farm crops, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 22



SR-111

Economic Analysis of the University of Kentucky Community Supported Agriculture Organic Vegetable Production System

7/12/2017 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Carl Dillon, Tiffany Thompson, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Farms marketing through a vegetable CSA are complex businesses facing many operational and economic challenges. To be economically viable, CSA farms must achieve the appropriate match of crops, equipment, and labor with farm size and number of CSA members. A diverse array of vegetable crops are typically grown with unique requirements for crop production, pest management, harvest, and post-harvest handling. An extensive suite of skills, tools, and equipment are required to produce these crops efficiently, and mechanization becomes critical as the number of acres in production increases.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, research, vegetables
Size: 6.50 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-110

Organic Sweet Corn

11/23/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Organic sweet corn is produced using pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic pesticides or petroleum-based fertilizers. Because organic crop production standards are regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP), growers producing and selling sweet corn labeled "organic" must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency. While there are benefits to using the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) for the certification process, Kentucky residents can be certified by any approved agency operating in the Commonwealth.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 604 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-111

Organic Tomatoes

11/23/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are one of the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky. With the rising consumer demand for organic products, organic tomatoes should be an excellent prospect for local fresh market sales.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 566 kb
Pages: 6



CCD-CP-58

Greenhouse-grown Specialty Cut Flowers

11/11/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

"Specialty cut flowers" generally refers to cut flower species other than roses, carnations, and chrysanthemums. Some of the specialty cut flowers that can be grown successfully in Kentucky greenhouses, or other protected environments such as high tunnels, include anemone (Anemone spp.), Asiatic or oriental lilies (Lilium spp.), bachelor button or cornflower (Centaurea spp.), celosia or cockscomb (Celosia spp.), coral bell (Heuchera hybrids), freesia (Freesia hybrids), larkspur (Delphinium spp.), lisianthus (Eustoma spp.), snapdragon (Antirrhinum spp.), pollenless sunflowers (Helianthis annus) and zinnias (Zinnia spp.), and sweetpea (Lathyrus odoratus).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, flowers, greenhouse, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, production practices
Size: 503 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-12

Organic Blackberries and Raspberries

11/3/2016 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Blackberries and raspberries (both Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as "brambles" or "caneberries." Erect (thorny and thornless), thorny primocane fruiting, and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries, as well as fall bearing raspberries, present an opportunity for organic production in Kentucky. Pests, especially spotted wing drosophila (SWD), present the greatest challenge for organic bramble production.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, production practices
Size: 799 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-109

Organic Lettuce and Leafy Greens

8/5/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Leafy greens and lettuce, which are among the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky, have excellent potential for organic production. Organic crops are produced using integrated pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling lettuce and greens with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state agency (e.g. the Kentucky Department of Agriculture) or private agency, plus follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 575 kb
Pages: 6



CCD-CP-108

Organic Asparagus

6/1/2016 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Asparagus is grown primarily in Kentucky for fresh market, especially near large population centers. Potential markets for organic asparagus include roadside stands, farmers markets, cooperatives, community supported agriculture (CSA) subscriptions, produce auctions, and local wholesalers. Restaurants, health food stores, and locally owned grocers may also be interested in Kentucky-grown organic products. Kentucky's market window for asparagus, which varies depending on region, can start as early as April and run through the month of June.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 513 kb
Pages: 4



ID-163

Agricultural Lime Recommendations Based on Lime Quality

1/13/2016 (major revision)
Authors: David Ditsch, Josh McGrath, Lloyd Murdock, Edwin Ritchey, Frank Sikora

Soil acidity is one of the most important soil factors affecting crop growth and ultimately, yield and profitability. It is determined by measuring the soil pH, which is a measure of the amount of hydrogen ions in the soil solution. As soil acidity increases, the soil pH decreases. Soils tend to be naturally acidic in areas where rainfall is sufficient to cause substantial leaching of basic ions (such as calcium and magnesium), which are replaced by hydrogen ions. Most soils in Kentucky are naturally acidic because of our abundant rainfall.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 485 kb
Pages: 6



ID-225

Organic Corn Production in Kentucky

1/15/2015 (new)
Authors: Chad Lee, Will Martin, Sam McNeill, Lee Meyer, Michael Montross, Edwin Ritchey, Tom Sikora

The number of organic dairy cows in Kentucky has been steadily increasing for years, yet there's not enough organic corn produced in the state to feed the growing herds. In short, a new market has developed in the state, but few local farmers are taking advantage of it. While Kentucky farmers are no strangers to corn, growing corn organically utilizes different management, cultural and marketing practices and requires new skills. And, importantly, organic production must follow an approved farm plan that allows farmers to sell their corn as certified organic. This publication is designed to be both an introduction to a new enterprise as well as a practical manual for those interested in pursuing organic corn production on their own farms.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 2.60 mb
Pages: 30



CCD-CP-13

Organic Blueberries

8/20/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub that will do well in most areas of Kentucky as long as the soil pH is properly adjusted. Organic production requires the use of pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling their berries with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency and follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, production practices
Size: 633 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-212

Fertilizing Your Lawn

7/22/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw

Lawns require fertilizer to remain healthy. Proper fertilization practices will lead to a thick, dark green, uniform lawn that is competitive against weed and disease invasions. The nutrients contained in fertilizers are necessary to support many processes occurring within the plants. If any essential nutrient is limiting, the plants will not perform at their highest level.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 425 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-214

Liming Kentucky Lawns

7/22/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Edwin Ritchey

Most homeowners desire an aesthetically pleasing landscape and will take steps to ensure success. Proper fertilizing, watering, and pest control are all steps that will lead to a quality lawn. However, some confusion surrounds when and why lime should be applied to a lawn. Many homeowners believe that lime needs to be applied on an annual basis for a quality lawn. The purpose of this publication is to explain why lime is needed and whether it is required on your lawn.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 909 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-213

Soybean Nutrient Management in Kentucky

4/24/2014 (new)
Authors: John Grove, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soybean grows best on fertile soils. For decades, the University of Kentucky has conducted field studies to establish the relationship between soil nutrient supplies and soybean yield. Adequate soil fertility must be present so that yields are not limited.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices, soybeans
Size: 1.02 mb
Pages: 5



CCD-SP-10

Organic Certification Process

4/14/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Cheryl Kaiser

Growers who plan to market their agricultural products as "organic" or "certified organic" must first be certified by a USDA accredited certifier. Certification, required by federal regulation, provides third party verification that the grower is complying with production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). Annual inspections and detailed record keeping are required for continuing certification. These strict regulations are meant to protect consumers by ensuring that all organic producers are adhering to the same set of uniform standards.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: organic production, production practices
Size: 430 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-61

High Tunnel Strawberries

4/4/2014 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels are relatively simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures placed over irrigated ground beds. Also known as hoop houses, high tunnels can be used to extend the production season of a wide variety of crops in Kentucky, including strawberries. A plasticulture system with drip irrigation is recommended when using high tunnels for strawberry production.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, fruits and nuts, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 528 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-211

Calibrating Fertilizer Spreaders for the Home Lawn

3/25/2014 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw

How much fertilizer should you use on your lawn? Too much can result in turf burn, wasted product and money, and potential environmental concerns. Too little will result in a low-density lawn that will not be attractive or competitive against weed invasions. To insure that you apply the proper amount of fertilizer to your lawn, you must calibrate your fertilizer spreader. You should calibrate your spreader each time you use a new (different) fertilizer because not all fertilizers have the same particle size or density. The information on the fertilizer bag is a good starting point for the calibration process but remember that spreaders can differ significantly. Calibrating your spreader will take a little bit of work, but the series of fairly simple steps below will help you complete the task.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 2.90 mb
Pages: 4



HO-110

Sustainable Production Systems: Principles and Approaches for Optimizing Efficiency in Nursery and Landscape Businesses

3/14/2014 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Sarah Vanek

Publications in the Sustainable Production Systems series discuss ways of pursuing sustainability in nursery production systems. Sustainable businesses are those that yield acceptable returns on investments, conserve natural resources, make positive contributions to the community, and create a workplace culture where employees feel safe, productive, and valued.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, production practices, sustainabable agriculture
Size: 5.95 mb
Pages: 17



AGR-210

Fertilizer Management in Alfalfa

1/8/2014 (new)
Authors: David Ditsch, Lloyd Murdock, Edwin Ritchey, Greg Schwab

Alfalfa is a high quality, valuable forage crop that can be successfully produced on most well-drained soils in Kentucky for hay, silage, and grazing. Fertilizing alfalfa can be uniquely challenging because it is a high-yielding crop that removes a tremendous amount of soil nutrients when compared to other crops grown in Kentucky. A thorough understanding of alfalfa's growth habits, nutrient requirements, and soil nutrient supply mechanisms is necessary to effectively manage fertilizer inputs and maximize profitability while minimizing environmental impact.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 4 kb
Pages: 4



HO-109

Sustainable Production Systems: Efficient Wholesale Nursery Layout

1/31/2013 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Sarah Vanek

This publication provides the framework for planning and implementing efficient wholesale nursery layout. Concepts and ideas presented here are applicable to new construction or the modification of an existing nursery. A basic approach toward creating efficient systems will be discussed as well as common nursery activities that may require consideration during the planning stages. Functional areas will be defined, and a framework for understanding the relationships between these functional areas will be presented.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, production practices, sustainabable agriculture
Size: 4.00 mb
Pages: 10



CCD-SP-2

High Tunnel Overview

6/12/2012 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels, also known as hoop houses, are relatively simple polyethylene-covered greenhouse-like structures built over ground beds. High tunnels can be used to extend the production season and marketing window of a wide variety of crops. They have been used in Kentucky to produce early season vegetables, cut flowers, brambles, and strawberries. High tunnels can also make it possible to produce leafy greens and herbs during the winter. Shaded, well-vented high tunnels can be used to grow some cool-season crops later into early summer.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 963 kb
Pages: 7



HO-100

Organic Gardening: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 18

5/7/2012 (new)
Authors: Krista Jacobsen

Organic gardening offers the gardener many benefits--a safe, low-chemical gardening environment, produce free from synthetic pesticide residues, and gardens that can increase in fertility and natural pest control over time. However, reaping the benefits of organic management requires planning, observation, and thinking about the garden as an interconnected system of soils, plants, pests, and beneficial organisms.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: organic production, production practices
Size: 615 kb
Pages: 12



AGR-204

Soils and Fertility: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 4

10/12/2011 (new)
Authors: Brad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soil is a mixture of weathered rock fragments and organic matter at the earth's surface. It is biologically active--a home to countless microorganisms, invertebrates, and plant roots. Soil provides nutrients, water, and physical support for plants as well as air for plant roots. Soil organisms are nature's primary recyclers, turning dead cells and tissue into nutrients, energy, carbon dioxide, and water to fuel new life.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 24



CCD-SP-1

Greenhouse Structures

5/25/2011 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

A greenhouse is a "tool" that can be used to facilitate the growing of plants. Generally, the tool is fitted for the job, and not the other way around. Growers need to determine what plants will be produced before making a decision about the type of greenhouse needed to accomplish the job. Depending on the crops to be grown, a conventional greenhouse may not even be needed. Instead, a simpler structure could more economically extend the growing season into spring and fall. For example, if the primary target is an early start date for farmers markets, row covers or a high tunnel may be quite adequate to handle the job.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, greenhouse, production practices
Size: 807 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-37

Organic Corn for Feed or Food

2/14/2011 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Organic white and yellow food grade corn is produced for use in organic cereals, tortillas, corn chips, snack foods, cornmeal, and other corn-based processed products. Organic corn is also used as animal feed in organic beef, dairy, poultry, and hog production

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, organic production, production practices, vegetables
Size: 467 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-185

Nitrogen Transformation Inhibitors and Controlled-Release Urea

4/21/2010 (major revision)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab

The soaring cost of fossil fuels is an indicator that nitrogen fertilizer prices are going to remain high for the foreseeable future. With higher N prices, many producers are trying to evaluate the usefulness of several N additive products in their production systems. High N prices make these products more attractive because it takes fewer pounds of saved N to offset the price of the additive. Producers should have a good understanding of how these products work in order to make informed decisions regarding their use.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 500 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-198

Sulfur Fertilization in Kentucky

10/23/2008 (new)
Authors: Greg Schwab

There are a lot of misunderstandings regarding sulfur (S) nutrition for Kentucky crops. Sulfur is considered a seconda r y pla nt nutrient because, although the crop requirement for S is relatively large, it is usually found in soil at concentrations adequate for plant growth and yield so that no fertilizer S is needed. For many years, soil S was maintained by atmospheric deposition. However, more stringent clean air standards require greater removal of S during burning of fossil fuels. That fact, along with increasing crop yields, has caused many Kentucky grain producers to begin to question if S fertilization will increase yield.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-16

Taking Soil Test Samples

9/4/2007 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab, Frank Sikora, Bill Thom

The most important part of making fertilizer recommendations is collecting a good, representative soil sample. Soil test results and fertilizer recommendations are based solely on the few ounces of soil submitted to the laboratory for analysis. These few ounces can represent several million pounds of soil in the field. If this sample does not reflect actual soil conditions, the results can be misleading and lead to costly over- or under-fertilization. It is necessary to make sure that the soil sample sent to the laboratory accurately represents the area sampled.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 150 kb
Pages: 4



HO-75

Home Composting: A Guide to Managing Organic Wastes

11/1/2005 (minor revision)
Authors: Bill Fountain

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: organic production, production practices
Size: 263 kb
Pages: 4



ID-154

Low-Maintenance Lawn Care, Stressing Pest Avoidance and Organic Inputs

3/15/2005 (reprinted)
Authors: Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Paul Vincelli, David Williams

This publication is written for those who wish to maintain their lawn with minimal inputs. Low-maintenance lawn care offers certain benefits, such as minimal pesticide use, reduced fertilizer input, less need for irrigation, and reduced mowing frequency. However, when choosing a low-maintenance approach, recognize that the lawn will not offer the same dark green, uniform sward of turf that is seen under a high-maintenance lawn-care program.

Departments: Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: organic production, production practices
Size: 176 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-180

Corn Stalk Nitrate Test

8/27/2004 (new)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Greg Schwab

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 136 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-106

Determining the Quality of Aglime: Relative Neutralizing Value (RNV)

12/4/2002 (minor revision)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Monroe Rasnake, Greg Schwab, Bill Thom

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 90 kb
Pages: 2



ID-72

Principles of Home Landscape Fertilizing

3/1/2001 (minor revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, John Hartman, A.J. Powell, Bill Thom

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 183 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-146

Using Animal Manures as Nutrient Sources

8/1/2000 (minor revision)
Authors: Monroe Rasnake, Frank Sikora, Bill Thom

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 330 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-5

When to Apply Lime and Fertilizer

9/1/1996 (minor revision)
Authors: Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 143 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-168

Broiler Litter Production in Kentucky and Potential Use as a Nutrient Source

7/1/1996 (new)
Authors: Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 66 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-163

Selecting the Right Fertilizer for Tobacco Production in Float Systems

2/1/1996 (new)
Authors: Gary Palmer, Bob Pearce

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 180 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-103

Fertilization of Cool-Season Grasses

3/5/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Charles Dougherty, Lloyd Murdock, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 16 kb
Pages:



AGR-151

Evaluating Fertilizer Recommendations

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 236 kb
Pages: 5



AGR-19

Liming Acid Soils

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Monroe Rasnake

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 10 kb
Pages:



AGR-43

Nitrogen in Kentucky Soils

3/1/1995 (reprinted)
Authors: J.L. Sims, Scott Smith, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 290 kb
Pages: 8



FOR-24

Kentucky Christmas Tree Production Workbook Fertilization

9/27/1991 (reprinted)
Authors: Bonnie Appleton, Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices
Size: 5 kb
Pages:



AGR-49

Liming and Fertilizing Burley Tobacco

4/1/1987 (new)
Authors: J.L. Sims, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 33 kb
Pages:



AGR-105

Fertilization and Liming for Corn

2/1/1983 (new)
Authors: Scott Smith, Scott Smith, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices
Size: 21 kb
Pages:



AGR-23

Tobacco Stalks and Stems Fertility Value and Use

5/1/1979 (reprinted)
Authors: W.O. Atkinson, Jones Smiley

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, nutrient management, production practices, tobacco
Size: 6 kb
Pages:



AGR-11

Potassium in Kentucky Soils

2/1/1979 (new)
Authors: Lloyd Murdock, Ken Wells

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 24 kb
Pages: