University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Paul Bachi



Black Spot of Rose
2/1/2016 (reviewed)

Black spot is the most common and serious disease of roses in Kentucky. It is a problem in greenhouse production and outdoor plantings. | PPFS-OR-W-10
web only | 1 pages | 344 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 350 kb


Gummosis and Perennial Canker of Stone Fruits
11/1/2015 (minor revision)

Gummosis is a general, nonspecific condition of stone fruits (peach, nectarine, plum and cherry) in which gum is exuded and deposited on the bark of trees. Gum is produced in response to any type of wound, regardless of whether it is due to insects, mechanical injury or disease. | PPFS-FR-T-8
web only | 2 pages | 559 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 207 kb


2012 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/6/2012 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2012 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and several demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in more than 15 counties in Kentucky. Research was conducted by faculty and staff from several departments within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture including: Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Agricultural Economics. This report also includes collaborative research projects conducted with faculty and staff at Kentucky State University. | PR-656
web only | 47 pages | 21,679 words | 54 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Black Root Rot of Ornamentals
5/1/2012 (minor revision)

Black root rot can affect a wide range of ornamentals in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and greenhouses. In Kentucky, this disease is commonly observed on Japanese and blue hollies, inkberry, pansy, petunia, and vinca. In addition to ornamentals, numerous vegetable and agronomic crops are susceptible. | PPFS-OR-W-3
web only | 3 pages | 873 words | 1 download | PDF: 585 kb


Sample Submission Protocol for Diagnosis of Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut
2/1/2012 (new)

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a fatal disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra), and most recently, butternut (Juglans cinerea). The disease complex involves a fungus that is carried to trees by the walnut twig beetle, causing numerous cankers on branches and killing trees 5 to 6 years after infection. The disease complex is widespread in the western U.S., and has recently been identified in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. | PPFS-OR-W-15
web only | 2 pages | 557 words | 1 download | PDF: 361 kb


2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2011 (new)

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-626
web only | 53 pages | 26,604 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,391 kb


2010 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
1/28/2011 (new)

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry. | PR-621
web only | 29 pages | 15,271 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 629 kb


2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2010 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky. | PR-608
1,000 printed copies | 70 pages | - | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Wheat Bacterial Streak
5/1/2010 (new)

Occasionally, wheat leaves and spikes are invaded by the bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris pv. translucens. When leaf tissue is affected, the resulting disease is known as bacterial streak. When the bacterium invades the head, the disease is called black chaff. While this disease has primarily been a problem in the lower mid-South, it is often found in Kentucky in fields that have been impacted by strong winds with blowing soil or following a damaging freeze. | PPFS-AG-SG-2
web only | 3 pages | 789 words | 1 download | PDF: 247 kb


Take-All of Wheat
5/1/2010 (minor revision)

"Take-all" is the common name of a root, crown, and basal stem (foot) rot that primarily affects wheat, but can also affect barley, oats, rye, as well as other grass crops and weeds. The disease has been known to destroy entire stands of wheat, thus the name. Barley, oats, rye, and other grass crops, however, have not been seriously impacted in Kentucky. Take-all is most common where susceptible crops are grown continuously without adequate rotation, or in fields where weedy grass hosts were not controlled in non-host crops, and were subsequently sown to wheat. The disease is rarely a serious problem in Kentucky due to excellent weed control practices, as well as the widespread adoption of cropping systems where wheat is produced, at most, every other year. | PPFS-AG-SG-1
web only | 2 pages | 749 words | - | PDF: 248 kb


2009 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/11/2009 (new)

The 2009 Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report includes results for more than 45 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 19 counties in Kentucky. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools that they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-603
1,000 printed copies | 56 pages | - | 15 downloads | PDF: 850 kb


Southern Blight of Soybeans
10/1/2008 (minor revision)

Southern blight is a minor disease of soybeans in the United States. Although the disease can occur in plants anytime from emergence through pod fill, it most commonly occurs in isolated plants in the latter stages of reproductive development. Occasionally, southern blight develops when plants are in the early to mid-vegetative stages. When this occurs, the disease may spread rapidly down rows, resulting in serious stand losses in patches. However, even in the worst case scenario, it would be extremely rare for southern blight to cause measurable yield losses in a commercial soybean field. | PPFS-AG-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 641 words | 1 download | PDF: 207 kb


Black Rot of Crucifers
2/1/2008 (minor revision)

Black rot, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), can be a very destructive disease of cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli. Other susceptible crucifers include: collards, kale, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, turnip, mustard, radish, and rutabaga. | PPFS-VG-1
web only | 3 pages | 792 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 227 kb


Blueberry Diseases
1/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky blueberry growers sometimes experience plant and crop losses due to diseases. While most losses are due to root rot, or to stem and twig canker diseases, fruit rots and nutritional problems can also reduce yields. With good crop management, most blueberry diseases can be avoided. | PPFS-FR-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,107 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 292 kb


Southern Blight
1/1/2008 (minor revision)

Southern blight affects a wide variety of crops, but the disease most commonly occurs in Kentucky on ajuga, beans, cabbage, cucumbers, pepper, soybeans, and tomato. Other susceptible plants include apple, carrot, columbine, coreopsis, eggplant, lupine, muskmelon, peanut, pumpkin, peony, phlox, potato, radish, rhubarb, sweet woodruf, tarragon, tobacco, turnip, watermelon, and vinca. | PPFS-VG-3
web only | 2 pages | 591 words | 1 download | PDF: 242 kb


Blossom End Rot
1/1/2008 (minor revision)

Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder (non-parasitic disease) caused by a lack of calcium (Ca) in the distal ends of developing fruit. Calcium is an essential part of the chemical "glue" that binds cells together within the fruit. When fruits are enlarging rapidly, sufficient amounts of Ca fail to reach the end of the fruit and cells then come apart. This is because Ca is not a very mobile element, so any disruption in uptake of Ca can result in a deficiency of Ca in developing fruit. | PPFS-VG-2
web only | 2 pages | 518 words | 1 download | PDF: 165 kb


Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot and Eutypa Dieback Diseases of Grape
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

"Cane and leaf spot" and "Eutypa dieback" were once thought to be the same disease. However, it is now known that each is a distinct disease caused by a different fungus. Grapes grown in areas where a moist environment persists are especially vulnerable to these fungal diseases. | PPFS-FR-S-1
web only | 2 pages | 631 words | 1 download | PDF: 183 kb