Online Publication Catalog


Most recently published titles:

In descending order, by date published.

 


AGR-18P

Grain, Forage, and Cover Crop Guide (poster)

7/7/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Erin Haramoto, Jimmy Henning, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Ray Smith

A quick resource on agronomic management of grain, forage, and cover crops. NOTE: This poster is 25 x 38 inches. AGR-18 is the booklet-sized version.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 277 kb
Pages: 1



ID-263

Alternative Protein Sources for Cattle

7/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Darrell Johnson, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Katherine VanValin

Kentucky has several bourbon distilleries and one fuel ethanol plant. The spent grains from the production of ethanol is utilized as a protein source in livestock feed. Shutdowns for fuel ethanol plants may also occur as a result of unfavorable profit margins when crude oil prices are low. Most distilleries and fuel ethanol plants will have a scheduled maintenance shutdown each year. During a shutdown, availability of distillers grains and other coproducts from these plants may be limited or unavailable. So, the question is what else can I feed in place of distillers grains?

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 2



PR-778

2020 Kentucky Small Grains Variety Performance Test

7/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, John Connelly, Gene Olson, Phillip Shine, Sandy Swanson, Dave Van Sanford

The objective of the Kentucky small grain variety performance trials is to evaluate varieties of wheat, oat, barley, triticale, spelt, and cereal rye that are commercially available or may soon be available to Kentucky farmers. New varieties continually are being developed by agricultural experiment stations and commercial firms. Annual evaluation of small grain varieties and selections provides farmers, seed producers, and other agricultural workers with current information to help them select the varieties best adapted to their locality and individual requirements.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, small grains, variety trials
Size: 1.93 mb
Pages: 20



NEP-219s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Preparando Su Huerto

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Una buena tierra es la base para un huerto saludable. La tierra suministra nutrientes a las plantas para el crecimiento y el apoyo para las raices. Una buena tierra ayuda a producir verduras saludables.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.50 mb
Pages: 8



NEP-220s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Los Ejotes

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Los ejotes son faciles de sembrar y rapidos de producir cuando se recogen mientras todavia estan verdes o inmaduro. Ellos son aun mas nutritivos cuando se les permite madurar ligeramente para producir frijoles verdes "shelly beans".

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.25 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-221s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Los Pimientos

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Los pimientos son relativamente faciles de cultivar y pueden proporcionar una cosecha consistente durante todo el verano. Puede comerlos crudos o cocidos para agregar sabor a muchos alimentos.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.62 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-251

Quick Identification Tips for Turfgrasses Commonly Grown in Kentucky

6/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Species of both warm- and cool-season turfgrasses are grown in Kentucky. Identification of these grasses is critical for implementation of proper management practices. Grass identification is commonly performed by observing specific parts of the plant. For a review of the parts of the grass plant, see AGR-216: 'Turfgrasses of Kentucky'. The objective of this extension publication is to provide concise identification tips to properly identify Kentucky turfgrasses.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: garden and landscape, turfgrass
Size: 4.10 mb
Pages: 4



ID-260

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Peach in Kentucky

6/8/2020 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Cheryl Kaiser, Matthew Springer, John Strang, Shawn Wright

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pathogen and pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pathogens and pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring for diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The images included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky peach plantings.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, garden and landscape, insect pests, plant diseases, weeds
Size: 20.77 mb
Pages: 28



PR-777

2019 Soybean Yield and Quality Contest

6/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Matt Adams, Danny Adams, Matt Futrell, Clint Hardy, Curt Judy, Carrie Knott, Leann Martin, Tyler Miller, Michelle Simon, Darrell Simpson, Mike Smith

In Kentucky, farmers grow soybeans in two common soybean production systems: full season and double crop. Farmers plant full season soybeans in the spring and harvest them that fall, so they have harvested one crop in one calendar year. Farmers plant double crop soybeans after wheat harvest in June. These soybeans are harvested later that fall, making them the second crop harvested in the same calendar year. Both systems are important to the overall production of soybean in Kentucky. Identifying management practices that maximize yield of each system is a vital step in identifying the most profitable management systems for Kentucky. Therefore, in 1980, an annual soybean yield contest was initiated in Kentucky to document the agronomic practices utilized by producers.

Departments: Boone County, Christian County, Daviess County, Hardin County, Henderson County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Muhlenberg County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Todd County, Wayne County
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, soybeans
Size: 985 kb
Pages: 12



ASC-244

Feeding Distillery Stillage to Beef Cattle

6/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler

The growth of the bourbon industry has provided an increase in distillery byproduct feedstuffs that can be utilized by cattle as a source of energy and protein. Learning the nutritional characteristics of these feedstuffs will facilitate proper feeding, allowing for improved cattle performance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 130 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-150

Understanding Soil Mechanics to Improve Beef Cattle Winter-Feeding Areas and Production

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Steve Higgins

Understanding soil mechanics and management in winter-feeding areas could improve beef cattle production, with less effort on the producer and cattle. This publication is intended to guide evaluating soil strength for winter-feeding areas, the pollution potential of winter-feeding areas, and to provide solutions for correcting structural deficiencies and reducing mud on both the ground and on the cattle.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, soil and land
Size: 93 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-151

Lanes for Beef Cattle Operations

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The benefits of lanes can be applied to pasture-based Kentucky cattle operations of any size. Lanes can be used to move cattle from pasture to pasture, and to access structures or barns, handling facilities, load-out areas, and areas with shade.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 2.89 mb
Pages: 2



ID-261

Are Common Stall Fans Effective? Orientation, Placement, and Fan Style

5/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Morgan Hayes, Staci McGill, Kimberly Tumlin

During summer months, horse owners hang fans around their barn and stalls in an effort to increase air movement to reduce temperature and flies in stall areas. These fans typically are 20-inch 3-speed box fans or 20-inch high velocity mounted fans. Both fans are easy to find at any home improvement or big box store and are ready to use with little to no assembly. But are these commonly used fans really serving these intended purposes?

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Epidemiology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 702 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-250

Remediation of the Fragipan Using Annual Ryegrass

4/29/2020 (new)
Authors: Dottie Call, John Grove, A.D. Karathanasis, Chris Matocha, Lloyd Murdock

The fragipan is a naturally occurring restrictive soil horizon that virtually stops water movement and root growth through the soil. It is commonly located 18-32 inches below the surface of most of Kentucky's fragipan soils. The dense nature of this layer is due to the cementation and binding of the soil particles with a silicate rich amorphous aluminosilicate in association with iron. The binding agents seal the pores and pack soil particles close together. The fragipan is found in 2.7 million acres in Kentucky, and about 50 million acres in the United States.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: soil and land
Size: 5.68 mb
Pages: 8



RB-341

Commercial Feeds in Kentucky, 2019

4/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Glen Harrison

Kentucky's commercial feed law provides protection for the state's livestock, poultry, and pet owners by regulating all feed materials offered for sale or for mixing into a feed. Products falling under regulation include all types of pet foods, livestock minerals, complete animal and poultry feeds, protein or mineral blocks, supplements, feed ingredients, specialty materials such as drug premixes, vitamin and mineral supplements, liquid feeds, pet supplements, pet treats, and other specialized pet foods. The law does provide for exemptions for whole and unprocessed grain, raw meat, hay, straw, stover, silage, cobs, husks, and hulls when not processed. Information in this report is intended to inform the feed purchaser, provide a basis for fair and equitable competition, and assist in assuring the safety of animal and human food.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 1.35 mb
Pages: 36



AEN-148

Considerations in Goat Barn Design

3/30/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Katie Jackson, Joe Taraba

Farmers who raise goats for meat or milk need guidance in the interrelated tasks of choosing a barn design and managing temperatures for their herd. Barn orientation, ventilation design, and stocking density are all important considerations which impact goats socially and physiologically, potentially impacting production. While other species are relatively well studied in these areas, research on goats is somewhat limited. The goal of this publication is to provide recommendations drawn from research in goats and sufficiently similar species.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 175 kb
Pages: 5



AEN-149

Heat Stress in Goats

3/30/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Katie Jackson, Joe Taraba

Heat stress is prevalent in most livestock species, but especially in dairy animals where large quantities of energy are necessary to sustain milk production. Both dairy goats in lactation and meat goats, which are being fed for growth, are susceptible to heat stress. Knowing the physiological signs to observe (like panting or excessive drinking) can make heat stress more apparent.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 159 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-1

Lime and Fertilizer Recommendations, 2020-2021

3/18/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Josh McGrath, Edwin Ritchey

Recommended nutrient additions, based on a soil test, are only made when a crop yield or economic response has been measured for that crop under Kentucky soil-climatic conditions. Many field studies have been conducted by the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station under Kentucky farm conditions to determine the extent of any primary, secondary, or micronutrient needs. Yield and soil test data from these studies serve as guidelines for establishing recommendations contained in this publication. Recommendations in this publication strive to supply the plant nutrients needed to achieve maximum economic return assuming good management practices.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nutrient management, production practices, soil and land
Size: 1.44 mb
Pages: 29



SR-112

Science of Hemp: Production and Pest Management, 2020

3/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Bernadette Amsden, Samantha Anderson, Ric Bessin, Susan Fox, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Ross Guffey, Tom Keene, Tyler Mark, Bob Pearce, Christopher Schardl, Jonathan Shepherd, Frank Sikora, Desiree Szarka, Raul Villanueva

Hemp is grown for fiber, grain, and cannabinoid extraction in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Until recently, Cannabis sativa has been classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance in the US. The Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) allowed for reintroduction of industrial hemp under a pilot research program. Acreage increases and addition of state legislation resulted in over 78,000 acres of hemp grown in 23 states by the end of 2018. Hemp became a legal commodity under the 2018 Farm Bill, and by the end of 2019, over 500,000 licensed acres were documented across 45 states. Canada re-introduced the crop in 1998, and in 2018, almost 78,000 acres of hemp were licensed and planted.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Graves County, Lyon County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology, Regulatory Services
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags:
Size: 9.60 mb
Pages: 54



4AJ-03PA

Poultry Barbecue Contests

3/9/2020 (minor revision)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

In the chicken barbecue contest, participants prepare four bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs provided by the contest monitors. The four thighs together will weigh 1.5-2.0 lb. They are judged on their cooking skills. The participants submit three of the thighs for sensory evaluation. No garnishes, dips, or additional items shall be presented on the plates and or submitted to the judges. In the turkey barbecue contest, each contestant will be provided two pounds of ground turkey. The turkey will not be available prior to the contest starting time. They need to prepare and cook turkey burgers. Each burger must be one-quarter pound of meat prior to cooking.

Departments: 4-H Programs, Animal and Food Sciences
Series: 4-H Animals and Poultry: Poultry and Poultry Products (4AJ series)
Tags:
Size: 934 kb
Pages: 8



AEN-146

UAV How-To: Create a Forage Canopy Model with Photogrammetry

3/9/2020 (new)
Authors: Joe Dvorak, Joshua Jackson, Cameron Minch, Tucker Sheffield

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are quickly becoming more integrated into producers' on-farm operations. With the advent of this new technology, users must understand how to convert raw UAV data into an applicable medium. Often the goal of UAV flights is to create a map of the output from a certain type of sensor. Thompson et al. (2018) have defined a general mapping process independent of drone type, sensor type, and mapping software. However, general mapping is significantly different than trying to record a three-dimensional model of the plant canopy structure. This article expands upon the workflow and details the process for developing a canopy model of a crop.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 1.28 mb
Pages: 5



PR-767

2019 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

3/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Timothy (Phleum pratense) is the fourth most widely sown cool-season perennial grass used in Kentucky for forage--after tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass. It is a late-maturing bunchgrass that is primarily harvested as hay, particularly for horses. It also can be used for grazing or wildlife habitat. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is a high-quality, highly palatable, long-lived pasture plant with limited use for hay. It tolerates close, frequent grazing better than most grasses. It has low yields and low summer production and becomes dormant and brown during hot, dry summers. Kentucky bluegrass is slow to establish.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 521 kb
Pages: 6



AGR-248

The Fate of Nitrogen Applied to Kentucky Turfgrass

2/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

The quality of Kentucky's surface and ground waters are of utmost importance to flora and fauna living in these waters. The growth of flora and fauna is directly related to the amount of available nutrients in these waters. In addition, we use these waters as the primary source of drinking water for ourselves and our families. A wide range of compounds may be found in these waters, the most common of which may be nitrate (NO3-). The sources of nitrogen (N) may include, but are not limited to, atmospheric deposition, septic tanks, effluent water disposal, agricultural fertilization, and landscape fertilization. The objective of this publication is to identify and describe the sources and potential fates of N applied to Kentucky turfgrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags:
Size: 748 kb
Pages: 5



AGR-249

Potassium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

2/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Potassium (K) is an essential plant element and is the most abundant mineral, macro-nutrient in turfgrass after nitrogen (N). Sufficient concentrations of K are important to maximize turfgrass tolerance to stresses caused by temperature, drought, traffic, and salinity. Understanding the function, soil content, and fertilizer forms of K is essential to creating an efficient nutrient management program.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags:
Size: 286 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-147

Structures for Beef Cattle

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Livestock housing, whether simple or sophisticated, must perform the required functions. It should meet the thermal and physical needs of the animal; it should provide a place to store and feed materials without damage or loss; it should increase the performance of cattle; and, it should allow the producer to conduct all chores associated with cattle production efficiently. A building can contribute to management efficiency and animal performance, which itself is defined by productivity, health and welfare. The building should create optimum environmental conditions for cattle by providing light, air flow, appropriate flooring, space, and ventilation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 956 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-245

Nitrogen for Kentucky Turfgrasses

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is required by turfgrass in larger quantities than any other mineral nutrient because the plant demand for N is high and the supply of N from the natural environment is normally low. In instances where N is not applied according to the University of Kentucky recommendations, applied N can increase the risk of surface and ground water contamination. The objective of this document is to describe the function of N in turfgrass, explain how soil and tissue tests can be used to manage N applications, and to describe the various N fertilizer sources available for application to turfgrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 168 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-247

Manganese for Kentucky Turfgrasses

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Manganese (Mn) is a common component of micronutrient packages applied to turfgrass and has been documented to result in increased greening of turfgrass. In order to effectively manage Mn applications, it is important to understand the function of Mn in turfgrass, the dynamics of Mn in the soil, and the various forms of Mn available for turfgrass applications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags:
Size: 879 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-145

Designing or Reworking Your Cattle-handling Facilities: A Checklist for Success

2/3/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Cattle-handling facilities should be designed to match the management goals of the operation. The safety of workers and cattle should be the highest priority when designing or reworking a handling facility. A well-designed facility will make working cattle faster, safer, less labor intensive, and less frustrating.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



FOR-135

Softwood Growth Rings

1/10/2020 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

Many softwoods look similar to the naked eye at first; the colors are often similar, maybe light-colored overlaid with tinges of yellow-brown or perhaps a slight pinkish cast. Even the weights of similarly-sized pieces (the densities) might seem similar. There are, however, differences in the wood structure that we can use to separate the various species. Two of the most important characteristics we look at are 1) the presence or absence of resin canals (as discussed previously) and 2) the appearance of the earlywood--latewood transition in annual growth rings.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 14.61 mb
Pages: 6



FOR-136

Further Distinguishing Softwood Species

1/10/2020 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

Recognizing that an unidentified sample is a resinous or non-resinous softwood, with either an abrupt or a gradual transition is a good start towards identifying an unknown specimen. The problem is that this information is rarely enough! Other characteristics need to be combined with that data. Some of the things to look out for include characteristic odors, the diameter of the tracheids, and the presence of storage cells. Sometimes the context or original location of the material can be helpful.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 3.34 mb
Pages: 4



FOR-137

Hardwood Growth Rings

1/10/2020 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

As in softwoods, hardwood species identification is accomplished by looking at species-specific combinations of features. Almost all hardwood species (including all of those from North America) contain vessels which appear as holes (pores) on wood cross-sections; hardwood species without vessels are unlikely to be encountered in North America. Those species are more commonly found in the southern hemisphere and are rarely sold as commercial species.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 14.73 mb
Pages: 8



FOR-138

Wood Structure and Mechanical Performance are Related

1/10/2020 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

There is a strong correlation between wood density and mechanical properties, and this is true for both softwood and hardwood species. Density and strength properties can vary even within species due to different growth conditions.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 3.17 mb
Pages: 4



PR-776

Kentucky Corn Silage Hybrid Performance Report, 2019

1/10/2020 (new)
Authors: Ricky Arnett, Matthew Campbell, Chad Lee, Linda McClanahan, Nick Roy

The objective of the Silage Corn Hybrid Performance Test is to provide unbiased forage yield and quality data for corn hybrids commonly grown for silage in Kentucky. Corn hybrids were evaluated for silage performance on cooperating farms. Representatives from seed companies submitted hybrids of their choosing. Most companies submitted only two (2) hybrids. One company supplies a third hybrid that serves as a check.

Departments: Adair County, Green County, Mason County, Mercer County, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 228 kb
Pages: 3



RB-340

Seed Inspection Report, 2019

1/9/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

The Division of Regulatory Services is charged with administering the Kentucky Seed Law and Regulations, a "truth-in-labeling" law requiring basic labeling of seed components and quality factors to inform producers and consumers about the attributes of seed lots offered for sale in Kentucky. Our regulatory program protects the seed industry and consumers through inspection, sampling and analysis of seed products in Kentucky.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 34



AGR-246

Iron for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/20/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Iron (Fe) is commonly applied using granular or foliar sources to enhance turfgrass color. Iron applications can result in darker green turfgrass as a result of increased Fe uptake or Fe oxidation on the leaf surface. In many cases, Fe results in no turfgrass response at all. Understanding the dynamics of Fe both in the plant and in the soil can enhance your nutrient management programs. The objective of this publication is to explain the function of Fe within the plant, describe the Fe sources available for turfgrasses, and identify which Fe fertilizers are most effective.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 1.78 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-242

Calcium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Calcium (Ca) is the dominant cation in all soils of agronomic importance and Kentucky soils are no different. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Ca. Consequently, Ca deficiency in Kentucky turfgrasses is extremely rare, and the probability of observing a Ca response on golf courses, home lawns, sod production, or sports fields is very low. Applying Ca fertilizers to artificially increase soil Ca above the level necessary for proper plant growth normally does not result in an increase in plant uptake because Ca uptake is genetically controlled. Regardless, Ca is commonly applied in both granular and liquid forms.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 112 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-243

Magnesium for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Magnesium is an essential element for all plants. Soluble magnesium (Mg) exists in soils primarily as Mg2+, a positively charged divalent cation. Kentucky soils are naturally high in Mg and, thus, Mg applications to turfgrass are normally unnecessary. However, turfgrasses grown in sand-based rootzones, such as golf course putting greens and sand-based sports fields, are prone to Mg deficiency. When Mg is necessary, it is essential to understand the function of Mg in the plant, the dynamics of Mg in the soil, and the forms of Mg fertilizers.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 826 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-244

Phosphorus for Kentucky Turfgrasses

12/19/2019 (new)
Authors: Brad Lee, Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Phosphorus (P) is an essential plant nutrient and a common component of many turfgrass nutrition programs. Although P application can improve turfgrass quality in some soils, most soils of Kentucky already have adequate plant-available P to support healthy turfgrass growth. What is the function of P within the plant, and how much P is required to sustain acceptable turfgrass in Kentucky? Also, if P applications are necessary, when and how should P be applied?

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nutrient management, ornamental plants, production practices, turfgrass
Size: 481 kb
Pages: 4



PR-774

2019 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.26 mb
Pages: 28



FCS5-474

Moving out of Your Parents' Basement: Should You Buy or Rent?

12/12/2019 (new)
Authors: Caitlin Grasson, Jennifer Hunter

It is increasingly more common for emerging adults to live with their parents for longer or to move back in with them after college. Either way, emerging adults (and their parents) have a goal of eventually being fully independent. Before moving out of your parents' house, there are some things you need to know, things you can be doing to prepare, and some things to consider. Let's start with some basics you may need to know before you get out into the real world by yourself.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 562 kb
Pages: 3



PR-773

2019 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/12/2019 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Summer annual grasses provide an important forage crop option for producers in Kentucky. These grasses are mainly used as emergency or supplemental hay and pasture crops, but little information is available on their yield potential. The purpose of this publication is to summarize the University of Kentucky 2013-2019 forage yield trials with sudangrass, sorghum/sudangrass, millets, teff, and cereal crops. Cool season annual grasses (specifically cereal crops) are also used as forages crops for hay, baleage or grazing. The cereal crops used in this report are wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and triticale (Triticum secale).

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 3.14 mb
Pages: 28



VET-36

Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle

12/9/2019 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by Anaplasma marginale, an organism that invades cattle red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in severe anemia, weight loss, fever, abortion and death in adult cattle. Anaplasmosis is considered a "tick-borne" disease because ticks transmit the organism when feeding on cattle. However, spread of this disease can be by any method that moves fresh blood from infected to susceptible cattle. In addition to ticks, the Anaplasma organism may be spread by biting insects (mosquitoes, horse flies, stable flies) or using blood-contaminated tools such as dehorners, ear taggers, castration tools, and implant guns without disinfection between animals. A very common method of transmission is using the same hypodermic needle on multiple animals when administering vaccines to the herd. Transmission may also be from cow to calf during gestation.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 3



PR-762

2019 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Daniel Becker, Win Dunwell, Rachel Rudolph, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collection of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmer markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry.Evaluation of varieties is a continuing necessity and allows us to provide the most up to date information in communications with vegetable growers. The vegetable variety trial results are the basis for updating the recommendations in our Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers (ID-36).

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, vegetables
Size: 6.67 mb
Pages: 34



PR-771

2019 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the bromegrasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.12 mb
Pages: 12



PR-772

2019 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 702 kb
Pages: 8



PR-769

2019 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 354 kb
Pages: 4



PR-770

2019 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 451 kb
Pages: 6



PR-765

2019 Orchardgrass Report

11/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Orchardgrass (Dactylus glomerata) is a high-quality, productive, cool-season grass that is well-adapted to Kentucky conditions. This grass is used for pasture, hay, green chop, and silage, but it requires better management than tall fescue for greater yields, higher quality, and longer stand life. It produces an open, bunch-type sod, making it compatible with alfalfa or red clover as a pasture and hay crop or as habitat for wildlife. This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 767 kb
Pages: 8



PR-768

2019 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

11/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) are high-quality, productive, cool-season grasses used in Kentucky. Both have exceptionally high seedling vigor and are highly palatable to livestock. Perennial ryegrass can be used as a short-lived hay or pasture plant and has growth characteristics similar to tall fescue. Festuloliums are hybrids between various fescues and ryegrasses with higher quality than tall fescue and improved stand survival over perennial ryegrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 16



PR-775

2019 Kentucky Soybean Performance Tests

11/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Joshua Duckworth, Claire Venard

The Kentucky Soybean Variety Performance Tests are conducted to provide an unbiased and objective estimate of the relative performance of soybean varieties commercially available in Kentucky. This information may be used by growers and seed producers to aid in selecting varieties that will give the highest total production in a specific situation. Soybean cultivars in the 2019 tests were entered by soybean growers, commercial companies, state and federal institutions.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 2.95 mb
Pages: 28



ID-36

Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers, 2020-21

11/26/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, John Strang, Shawn Wright

Successful vegetable production generally requires the grower to make daily decisions regarding pest management, irrigation, and cultural practices. The most widely commercially-grown vegetables in Kentucky are included in this publication.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 22.00 mb
Pages: 128



PR-763

2019 Alfalfa Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfal-fa varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 8



PR-764

2019 Red and White Clover Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 14 and 15 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at forages.ca.uky.edu contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 873 kb
Pages: 8



PR-766

2019 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is a productive, well-adapted, persistent, soil-conserving, cool-season grass grown on approximately 5.5 million acres in Kentucky. This grass, used for both hay and pasture, is the forage base of most of Kentucky's livestock enterprises, particularly beef cattle. Much of the tall fescue in Kentuckys infected with an internal fungus (endophyte) that produces ergot alkaloids and results in decreased weight gains in growing ruminants and lower pregnancy rates in breeding stock, especially in hot weather. Varieties are now available that are free of this fungal endophyte or infected with a nontoxic endophyte. Varieties in the latter group are also referred to as "novel" or "friendly" endophyte varieties, because their endophyte improves stand survival without creating animal production problems

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 12



AEN-144

Four Beef Cattle Barn Flooring Options: A Case Study

11/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Barn floor design is critical to the physical and thermal comfort, health and safety of cattle. Generally speaking, barn flooring is the surface on which an animal stands, lies down, and excretes its urine and manure. Therefore, to meet animal needs, it must be durable, not slippery, and well drained, as well as comfortable, warm, and dry. In addition to providing animal comfort, the flooring should easily be cleaned. No single material, from concrete to soil, meets all of these specifications.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 3.55 mb
Pages: 3



PPA-1

Chemical Control of Turfgrass Diseases, 2020

11/19/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Paul Vincelli

Turgrasses under intensive management are often subject to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Good turf management practices often greatly reduce the impact of disease by promoting healthy plants that are better able to resist infections. Even under good management, however, diseases sometimes cause excessive damage to highly managed turfgrasses. The proper use of fungicides in these instances, in conjunction with good cultural practices that promote quality turf, can be an important part of an overall disease-management program.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Plant Pathology (PPA series)
Tags: garden and landscape, plant diseases, turfgrass
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 34



AEN-142

Loose Housing for First-Calf Heifers: A Case Study

11/11/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The loose housing system increases the productivity of the replacement herd and the stockman by providing the optimum environment for production and management. While there is work in creating the system upfront, the design will reduce effort later by creating greater efficiency, flow, and movement of materials.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-143

Calf Areas, Pens or Pastures: A Case Study

11/11/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The creation of a creep pen or pasture area can be accomplished using various methods and materials. Using what is on hand and/or revitalizing an unused area of the farm that has infrastructure may reduce expenses. The cost of one fallen calf could pay for the implementation of the practice. This practice may benefit spring calves over fall calves, so that might be a consideration when choosing a time to plan construction of your creep area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-6

Chemical Control of Weeds in Kentucky Grain Crops, 2020

11/7/2019 (major revision)
Authors: J.D. Green, Travis Legleiter

The use of herbicides suggested in this publication is based on research at the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station and elsewhere. We have given what we believe to be the most effective herbicides, with the most suitable rates and times of application. Smaller files are available here.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, production practices, small grains, soybeans, weeds
Size: 2.25 mb
Pages: 140



HO-115

Ecosystem Services of Landscape Plants: A Guide for Green Industry Professionals

11/4/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Josh Knight

This publication is meant to assist green industry professionals in marketing and customer education efforts as they explore marketing their products and services to improve green infrastructure. Consumers are placing increasing value on and acknowledging the critical role that landscape plants play in the urban environment, from reducing urban heat islands to improving the aesthetic experience (i.e. curb appeal) we derive from the landscape of an individual home.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags:
Size: 2.55 mb
Pages: 12



HO-121

Ecosystem Services of Landscape Plants: A Guide for Consumers and Communities

11/4/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Josh Knight

This publication is intended to assist consumers and community groups in learning about the value of landscape plants. Landscape plants play an important role in the urban environment, from reducing urban heat islands to improving the aesthetic experience (i.e. curb appeal) we derive from the landscape of an individual home. Further, there is a growing body of scientific literature evaluating the critical role of trees in landscaping within urban and suburban environments like residential neighborhoods, commercial/industrial areas, and associated green infrastructure like park systems and green belts. One useful tool for articulating the functions landscape plants perform for us is the concept of ecosystem services.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags:
Size: 2.48 mb
Pages: 10



HO-111

Understanding Irrigation Water Test Results and Their Implications on Nursery and Greenhouse Crop Management

10/24/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram

The purpose of this fact sheet is to discuss irrigation water quality factors and to present general guidelines for optimal ranges for measured factors in a University of Kentucky water analysis for nursery and greenhouse crop production.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: nursery and landscape
Size: 157 kb
Pages: 6



HO-82

Rootstocks for Kentucky Fruit Trees

10/15/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Daniel Becker, John Strang, Dwight Wolfe, Shawn Wright

Most fruit trees that can be grown in Kentucky do not come true from seed. For example, a tree grown from a Golden Delicious apple seed will produce an apple tree, but the fruit will have different characteristics than Golden Delicious in color, taste, and shape. This is why fruit trees are reproduced by asexual propagation, such as budding and grafting.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 250 kb
Pages: 6



PR-761

2019 Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test

10/15/2019 (new)
Authors: Cam Kenimer, Chad Lee, Matthew Piersawl, Phillip Shine

The objective of the Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test is to provide relative performance estimates of hybrid seed corn sold in Kentucky. The test attempts to treat every hybrid similarly in an unbiased manner. Agronomic practices that meet or exceed university guidelines are implemented at each location.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, research, variety trials
Size: 1.04 mb
Pages: 28



ID-259

Suitable Spaces for Indoor Horse Activities

10/14/2019 (new)
Authors: Bob Coleman, Morgan Hayes, Staci McGill

Many horse owners involved in the industry look for an indoor arena in which to work horses regardless of weather. These facilities might be at home or at a community location for many riders to access. The following highlights some common characteristics and requirements of indoor arenas. While these act as minimums, many disciplines and activities may require additional investment in facilities, such as larger dimensions, more lighting, special footing, etc.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: horses
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 2



FCS5-472

Savvy Sellers and Bargain Hunters: Online Edition

10/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Jennifer Hunter

For centuries, the town marketplace has been the hub of buying and selling. The same is true today, although the nature of the marketplace has changed. Buying and selling is shifting from brick-and-mortar-type stores to online retailers. The U.S. Census Bureau reported nearly $453.5 billion in e-commerce sales in 2017. As a consumer, it is important to know the pros and cons of online marketplace transactions. It is helpful to be aware of potential pitfalls when buying and selling online, ways to protect your identity, and which online marketplaces are available.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Science
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 271 kb
Pages: 3



FCS5-473

Understanding Credit and Credit Scores as a Young Adult

10/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Caitlin Grasson, Jennifer Hunter

Talking about credit and credit scores can be both boring and overwhelming for young adults. However, it is important to know what credit is and how it impacts your future. Do not put off learning about credit scores until you are ready to buy your first house or car. Being proactive can help you avoid future headaches and put you on a path toward being an independent adult.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 276 kb
Pages: 2



RB-339

Annual Report Analyses of Official Fertilizer Samples July 2018 - June 2019

10/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

This bulletin presents the results of the analysis of 2,691 official samples of commercial fertilizer taken during the period of July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019 by the field inspection staff. The samples represented approximately 61,000 tons of fertilizer out of the approximately 1,058,000 tons sold during this period. The Laboratory made 2,206 nitrogen, 1,757 phosphorus, 1,871 potassium, and 1,371 secondary and minor element analyses on these samples. Table 1 shows the manufacturers whose product the field inspection staff sampled, along with the number of samples taken and the percentage of those samples that passed. Table 2 shows the detailed N, P2O5, and K2O analyses of samples of mixed fertilizers and fertilizer materials. Table 3 contains the results of secondary and minor element analyses. Table 4 is a listing of companies or licensees registered or licensed to sell fertilizer in Kentucky as of June 30, 2019.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 6.85 mb
Pages: 200



PPFS-GEN-1

Crown Gall

10/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: David Embry, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Crown gall can affect a wide range of crops, including woody ornamentals, tree fruits and small fruits. Some vegetable and herbaceous ornamentals are also susceptible but these crops are less commonly affected.

Departments: County Extension, Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.04 mb
Pages: 5



ID-258

Weaning Beef Calves

9/17/2019 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Michelle Arnold, Darrh Bullock, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Weaning is the process of separating suckling offspring from their dam. Weaning is a management procedure applied by the herd manager. Cattle are herd animals and their gregarious nature can lead to stress as a result of this separation. Managing the weaning process can aid in reducing stress for the animals and livestock managers.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 821 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-241

Improved Turfgrass Varieties Can Reduce Your Environmental Impact

8/29/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Turfgrasses have many benefits, but oftentimes people question if pesticides, fertilizers, and water are justified to sustain a quality turfed area. Although these inputs have long been required to produce thick and dark green turfgrass, some turfgrass breeders have focused on improving the genetics of turfgrasses to produce high quality turf with fewer inputs. Improved turfgrass varieties with increased density, better color, deeper rooting, and improved disease resistance through improved breeding can reduce the overall environmental footprint. Many people select a turfgrass species and variety based on cost, but choosing an improved variety can reduce environment risk and overall maintenance costs in the long-run.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: garden and landscape, turfgrass
Size: 4.78 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-52

Selecting the Right Grass for Your Kentucky Lawn

8/29/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

The best grass for your lawn is not necessarily the one you like the best, but the one that is best adapted to where you live and will take less work and fewer inputs (water, fertilizer, pesticides). Many people think that since Kentucky is the "Bluegrass State," it's best to grow Kentucky bluegrass across our state. Actually, Kentucky bluegrass is only marginally adapted to our climate and can require more inputs to keep an appealing lawn than some other choices. In general, Kentucky bluegrass can be an option for parts of central and eastern Kentucky, while zoysiagrass may be a better option in western Kentucky. Tall fescue is adapted to the entire state so is a good choice for most locations. Perennial ryegrasses and fine fescues are occasionally useful in different areas of the state, depending on specific conditions.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: garden and landscape, turfgrass
Size: 4.46 mb
Pages: 7



NEP-219

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Preparing Your Garden

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

This publication provides easy to follow advice on how to start and maintain your garden. For specific fruit and vegetable guides, refer to the NEP "Grow your own" series.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 7



NEP-220

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Green Beans

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Green beans are easy to grow and fairly quick to produce when picked while still green or immature. They are even more nutritious when allowed to slightly mature to produce "shelly" beans. Pole beans in the garden are often popular with children since the bean vines on their supports create great hiding places.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-221

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Peppers

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Peppers are generally easy to grow and provide good summer crops that you can eat raw or cooked to add flavor to many foods. There are many different types of peppers, which are set apart by their shape or spiciness (heat), and most will grow well in Kentucky. Many heirloom, or vintage, varieties exist as well.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.65 mb
Pages: 4



HO-117

Guide to Landscape Appraisal of Tree Species in Kentucky Landscapes

8/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Bill Fountain

This publication is intended to aid professionals in determining the value of species in Kentucky (the Commonwealth). This valuation method is not appropriate for valuation of shrubs, forest trees, pasture trees, trees being used for income (i.e. orchards, nursery production, Christmas tree production, etc.). It is solely for trees that are an integral part of a formal, managed landscape.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: garden and landscape, trees
Size: mb
Pages:



ID-253

Species Failure Profile for Trees Common to the Ohio River Valley

8/23/2019 (new)
Authors: Julie Beale, Bill Fountain

Tree failures, especially in urban and recreational areas can result in harm to human life and property. While this is rare, it is important to recognize that the environmental and sociological benefits provided by trees significantly outweighs the limited risks presented by trees. This is especially true when defects and species profiles that increase the potential for failure can be observed or detected. Many of these defects are associated with certain species. This is referred to as the species failure profile.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 320 kb
Pages: 8



ID-194

Diagnosing Plant Problems: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 7

8/22/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Jessica Bessin, Rick Durham, Adam Leonberger, Kimberly Leonberger, Matthew Springer, Andrea Stith, Lee Townsend, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Stacy White, Erica Wood

For those with a green thumb, growing plants may seem easy. However, when plant problems arise, determining the cause of these issues can be difficult. Developing the skills necessary to determine the cause of a plant problem takes experience and time. The steps involved in the diagnostic process first require analysis of information regarding the history of the symptomatic plant and the surrounding area. Plant symptoms and signs provide additional evidence to aid in determination of a possible cause.

Departments: Barren County, Bell County, Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Franklin County, Hopkins County, Horticulture, Mercer County, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 28



AGR-240

Cover Crop Benefits and Challenges in Kentucky

8/7/2019 (new)
Authors: Chad Lee, Hanna Poffenbarger, Dan Quinn

A cover crop is a plant species that is grown between cash crops primarily to provide cropping system services rather than to produce a harvestable product. Services provided by cover crops include soil health improvement, soil conservation, nutrient release and capture, and weed suppression. However, like any management practice, cover crops also have challenges and limitations. This publication is intended to provide an overview of cover crop use in Kentucky and the challenges and benefits of this practice.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 4.82 mb
Pages: 6



FOR-133

Using Camera Surveys to Estimate White-tailed Deer Populations

8/7/2019 (new)
Authors: Jonathan Matthews, Matthew Springer

For the past 20 plus years, wildlife biologists have used game camera surveys to estimate population size and health in many wildlife species including white-tailed deer. Population estimates of wildlife populations have historically been conducted through capture-mark-recapture surveys, line-transect surveys, helicopter surveys, and other methods. These methods, while proven accurate, are often costly, time-consuming, and are not readily available to the average landowner. In the 1990s, researchers evaluated the reliability of camera surveys based on proven methods of population estimates. Studies indicated that camera surveys are a reliable method for accurate population estimates of white-tailed deer, and more recent studies have continued to support this method. The simple yet robust method has created a reliable, rather easily implementable tool to the public, allowing them to inventory their deer herds on the properties they own or lease.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 847 kb
Pages: 8



FOR-134

Identifying and Mitigating Plant Damage Caused by the Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

8/7/2019 (new)
Authors: Matthew Springer

Woodpeckers cause various types of damage to plants, trees, and even human structures. There are several species of woodpeckers present in Kentucky, and damage varies with species. One species of woodpecker that creates a rather unique type of damage is the yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varus), which overwinters in Kentucky and then migrates north in spring.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags: wildlife
Size: 1.01 mb
Pages: 2



PPFS-FR-S-15

Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Strawberry Diseases

8/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 398 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-FR-T-2

Apple Fruit Diseases Appearing at Harvest

8/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

Diseases of apple fruits appearing at harvest can cause significant losses in yield and quality. To know what control measures to take next year to prevent similar losses, it is important to recognize what is being observed. In some cases, growers will need to cut the fruit open to identify the problem.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 306 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-FR-T-24

Bitter Rot of Apple

8/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Madison McCulloch, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Bitter rot is the most common fruit rot of apple in Kentucky. Trees in both commercial and residential plantings can suffer devastating losses. Growers consider bitter rot the most important fruit rot and the second most destructive disease in Kentucky apple orchards. Yield losses can range from 10% to 100%.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant diseases
Size: 1.49 mb
Pages: 6



PPFS-FR-T-25

Cultural Calendar for Commercial Apple Production

8/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, Matthew Springer, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

egrated pest management (IPM) includes the combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical tools in efforts to manage diseases and pests while minimizing risks associated with pesticides. Cultural practices are an integral part of an IPM program and should be incorporated into all commercial systems whether large or small, conventional or organic. This publication provides recommended practices at approximate growth stages and/or production periods. However, these timelines are approximate and may require adjustment for particular conditions. Growers who encounter situations that may not align with suggestions here should contact their county Extension office for assistance. Extension offices can also provide updated pest management recommendations. This cultural guide serves as a supplement to published spray guides and scouting guides.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant diseases
Size: 986 kb
Pages: 7



PPFS-FR-T-26

Cultural Calendar for Commercial Peach Production

8/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, Matthew Springer, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Integrated pest management (IPM) includes the combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical tools in efforts to manage diseases and pests while minimizing risks associated with pesticides. Cultural practices are an integral part of an IPM program and should be incorporated into all commercial systems whether large or small, conventional or organic. This publication provides recommended practices at approximate growth stages and/or production periods. However, these timelines are approximate and may require adjustment for particular conditions. Growers who encounter situations that may not align with suggestions here should contact their county Extension office for assistance. Extension offices can also provide updated pest management recommendations. This cultural guide serves as a supplement to published spray guides and scouting guides.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant diseases
Size: 1.39 mb
Pages: 7



ID-188

Strategic Winter Feeding of Cattle using a Rotational Grazing Structure

7/30/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Winter feeding of cattle is a necessary part of nearly all cow-calf operations. In winter months, livestock producers often confine animals to smaller "sacrifice" pastures to reduce the area damaged from winter feeding. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have significant negative impacts on soil and water quality. Such areas include locations in floodplains, such as those along creek bottoms or around barns near streams. These locations are convenient, flat areas for setting hay ring feeders; however, their negative effects on water quality outweigh the convenience.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 737 kb
Pages: 4



ID-255

BerryCare: Building a Blackberry Community

7/30/2019 (new)
Authors: Dawn Brewer, Annie Koempel, Amy Kostelic

So you've heard how blackberries are good for your health. Growing blackberry bushes as a garden project can be quite rewarding, especially if you do it as a group. Your local Cooperative Extension Office or non-profit organization may have the perfect place for planting the bushes where berries can be shared with an identified community. With a little sunshine and good drainage, the right variety, and proper blackberry plant care, a group can work towards a successful harvest.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 1.87 mb
Pages: 3



ID-256

BerryCare: When Blackberries and Other Berries are in Season

7/30/2019 (new)
Authors: Dawn Brewer, Annie Koempel, Amy Kostelic

Blackberries are fresh and in season during the mid summer months. But this does not mean you cannot eat them year round. In addition to buying frozen berries during the winter months, you can also plan ahead and freeze your berries when they're in season. Frozen berries are just as healthy and easy to use as fresh.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 2.14 mb
Pages: 4



ID-257

BerryCare: Protection from Pollution with Phytonutrient-Rich Berries

7/30/2019 (new)
Authors: Dawn Brewer, Annie Koempel, Amy Kostelic

Pollution in the environment cannot always be avoided. However, eating for good health may help reduce the effects of pollution in the body. Choosing more nutritious foods, such as those high in phytonutrients, may reduce oxidative stress and protect the body from the negative health effects of pollution.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 2.28 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-134

Fenceline Feeder Systems for Beef Cattle Production and Resource Conservation

7/29/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

One of the most challenging and costly aspects of beef cattle production in Kentucky is winter-feeding. Many producers complain about the time required to feed stored forages, the mud, the drudgery that it creates for the operator, and the decline in production. The intense traffic associated with winter-feeding on unimproved surfaces causes mud, compaction, erosion, and loss of desirable vegetation, often resulting in annual pasture renovations to address areas impacted by winter-feeding practices. Fenceline feeding systems offer an alternative to traditional in-field bale feeding during the wet winter conditions that Kentucky often experiences. These structures can be utilized to reduce the impact of winter-feeding on pastures and improve the operational efficiency of a winter-feeding area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 2.55 mb
Pages: 13



ASC-243

Managing Dry, Open Ewes

7/25/2019 (new)
Authors: Debra Aaron, Don Ely

Ewes on vacation should remain healthy, but not become obese. Keeping them in a BCS of 1.5 to 2.0 will not be an easy chore because all they have to do is graze and deposit body fat. Limiting forage dry matter consumption to 2.0% of body weight daily through stocking rate management and rotational grazing is the best way to keep ewes from becoming excessively fat. If ewes have an optimum BCS at the beginning of nutritional flushing, and are flushed correctly, 95 to 98% of the ewes will conceive in a short period of the breeding season and lambing rate can be increased by 15 to 20% above that of less intensely managed ewes.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, sheep
Size: 749 kb
Pages: 2



PR-760

2019 Kentucky Small Grains Variety Performance Test

7/12/2019 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, John Connelly, Gene Olson, Matthew Piersawl, Sandy Swanson, Dave Van Sanford

The 2019 soft red winter wheat growing season ended with Kentucky farmers harvesting approximately 340,000 acres of the 450,000 acres planted, for a total production of 26.2 million bushels of grain. An average yield of 77 bushels per acre was estimated by NASS. The acreage not harvested for grain was primarily used for forage production and cover cropping.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, small grains, variety trials
Size: 2.25 mb
Pages: 28



HENV-402

Water Quality and Nutrient Management at Home

7/2/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Gregg Munshaw, Suzette Walling

Fertilizers and other lawn amendments benefit the residential landscape by providing or supplementing the essential nutrients for plant growth and maintenance. Commercial fertilizers are commonly formulated based on three major nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and each plays an important role in plant development. However, improper application of fertilizers and amendments may increase the risk of non-point source pollution of surface and ground waters.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Tags:
Size: 381 kb
Pages: 4



AR-129

KAES Annual Report, 2016

7/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Bennett

This annual report lists experiment station research projects and publications completed during 2016. The research programs of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station have benefited Kentucky's agriculture over the past century, and the results of present and future research will continue to serve Kentucky's primary industry. In 2016, research activities of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station were conducted at Lexington, Princeton, Quicksand, and Owenton and in counties throughout the state. Efforts are constantly made to ensure that the research studies have application to the problems of all Kentucky farmers and other clientele groups.

Departments: Administration (Research)
Series: Experiment Station Annual Report (AR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.80 mb
Pages: 72



PPFS-AG-C-9

Curvularia Leaf Spot

7/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Nolan Anderson, Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Curvularia leaf spot is a corn disease that was reported for the first time in the United States in Louisiana in 2017, and was confirmed in Kentucky in 2018. While the impact of Curvularia leaf spot in Kentucky is not yet known, this disease causes yield loss in tropical areas, and is considered to be one of the most important diseases of corn in China. This publication describes the symptoms and cause of disease, conditions that favor disease development, and foliar diseases that have similar symptoms.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.78 mb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-T-5

Maintaining the Efficacy of Foliar Fungicides for Tobacco Disease Management

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Bob Pearce, Emily Pfeufer

Management of resistance to fungicides is based on alternating the use of particular modes of action, or FRAC groups, which essentially presents multiple different challenges to the fungal population. Overall, fungi that are naturally resistant to a mode of action are very rare in the environment. Challenging a population with multiple different modes of action will reduce the chance of developing widespread resistance, which will prolong the efficacy of these chemicals.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 473 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-S-18

Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Grape Diseases

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 407 kb
Pages: 5



PPFS-FR-S-21

Sample Fungicide Spray Schedule for Commercial Blueberry

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

A sample fungicide spray schedule for commercial blueberry growers (table).

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 280 kb
Pages: 1



PPFS-FR-S-23

Simplified Backyard Grape Spray Guide

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Patsy Wilson

A simplified backyard grape spray guide (table).

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 351 kb
Pages: 1



PPFS-FR-S-24

Backyard Grape Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.21 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-S-25

Backyard Berry Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.04 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-S-26

Commercial Strawberry Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

A fungicide spray guide and worksheet for commercial strawberry growers.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 230 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-FR-T-15

Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Apple Diseases

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 385 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-FR-T-18

Simplified Backyard Apple Spray Guides

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Beth Wilson

Apple production requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays.

Departments: County Extension, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Pulaski County
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 626 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-20

Simplified Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Spray Guide

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Peach, nectarine, apricot, plum, and cherry are all stone fruits. Production of these tree fruits requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. Disease resistant cultivars are the preferred method for reducing spray inputs.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 672 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-FR-T-21

Backyard Apple and Pear Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 1.01 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-22

Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar

7/1/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic production, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 890 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-23

Commercial Peach/Stone Fruit Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

A spray schedule worksheet for commercial peach/stone fruit growers.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 458 kb
Pages: 1



PPFS-GEN-15

Considerations for Diagnosis of Ornamentals in the Landscape

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Amy Aldenderfer, Adam Leonberger, Kimberly Leonberger, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Diagnosing plant problems can be challenging. A site visit can provide the information necessary for a complete and accurate diagnosis. However, once on-site, it is important to know how to proceed. The following guidelines are intended to assist in the process of gathering pertinent information and determining a possible cause. Often abiotic conditions such as environment, mechanical damage, or living organisms like insects or wildlife may be to blame. Should the field site diagnosis be inconclusive and samples need to be submitted to the UK Plant Diagnostic Laboratories, the information gathered here can provide valuable supplementary information.

Departments: County Extension, Franklin County, Hardin County, Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 3.38 mb
Pages: 6



PPFS-OR-T-2

Reducing the Risk of Resistance to Fungicides Used to Control Diseases of Turfgrasses

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Paul Vincelli

Fungicides can be an important tactic in an overall integrated program for turf disease control. In order to insure that products available today remain available in the future, golf course superintendents should be aware of the need to use fungicides in ways that minimize the risk of fungicide resistance.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Turf Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-T series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 183 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-VG-1

Black Rot of Crucifers

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: David Davis, Emily Pfeufer

Black rot, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), can be a very destructive disease of cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli. Other susceptible crucifers include: collards, kale, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, turnip, mustard, radish, and rutabaga.

Departments: Clark County, Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 227 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-10

Foliar Diseases of Cucurbits

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, gourds, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the foliage of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 327 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-11-QF

Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits Quick Facts

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Steve Osborne, Kenny Seebold

Highlights from the publication Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits, PPFS-VG-11.

Departments: County Extension, Entomology, Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 786 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-141

Maps for Farm Planning

6/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Planning and design are critical steps when modernizing a farm to meet the current and future operational needs. Farm renovations and redevelopment must always consider the cost/benefit of changes, while staying consistent with good agricultural practice guidelines that conserve labor and the resources of the farm. The process of developing a farm map will be used to guide producers on the concepts and considerations necessary to make decisions related to planning renovations and developing new infrastructure on the farm.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.32 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-140

Constructing a Platform Alley Scale System

6/17/2019 (new)
Authors: Joshua Jackson

Most producers would like information on cattle weight to improve management. The widespread use of cattle scales on most farms in Kentucky is limited by the cost of purchasing the equipment. Local cattlemen's associations or extension office's frequently have scale systems to rent or borrow. This has challenges due to scheduling conflicts, reliability, rental fees, or the scale may not align with the handling facility layouts. There are two options for producers to obtain cattle weights--in the alley or at the chute. An alley scale provides the ability to measure cattle weight independent of the head gate or cattle chute. This publication describes the measurement of cattle in the alley leading to a head gate or cattle chute.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 2.90 mb
Pages: 6



ID-254

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Grape in Kentucky

6/11/2019 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, Matthew Springer, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Patsy Wilson, Shawn Wright

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pathogen and pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pathogens and pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring for diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The images included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky grape plantings.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, insect pests, plant diseases, weeds
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 36



HO-123

What Is a Carbon Footprint and How Does It Relate to Landscape Plants?

6/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram, Josh Knight

Carbon footprint is a term used to describe the impact of greenhouse gas emissions associated with a product or activity. The objective of this publication is enhance the reader's understanding of carbon footprint (CF) terminology and the science underlying its determination. Having such an understanding is necessary for managers and developers to minimize the negative environmental impacts of new product development and assess positive or negative cradle-to-grave life-cycle impacts. Life cycle assessment has been used to characterize the CF of representative field-grown and container-grown landscape plants.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 5



FCS3-630

Savor the Flavor: Seasoning with Spices

6/3/2019 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Annhall Norris, Janet Tietyen-Mullins

Making foods flavorful is just one of the many benefits of using spices in the kitchen. Adding salt to a dish can be the first thing that comes to mind to add flavor when something is bland, but using spices during cooking may be a more healthful choice.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.18 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-FR-T-14

Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Stone Fruit Diseases

6/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 401 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-VG-24

Biological Products for Tomato Disease Management

6/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Erica Fealko, Emily Pfeufer

Disease management products with biologically-based active ingredients are often labeled for numerous diseases, but can vary markedly in their efficacy. This Extension publication summarizes factors to consider when choosing biological controls and data available pertaining to tomato disease management efficacy.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, nursery and landscape, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 268 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-629

Savor the Flavor: Building Flavors with Herbs

5/16/2019 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Annhall Norris, Janet Tietyen-Mullins

Herbs are usually what give many of our most loved foods their characteristic taste, like the boldness of a pasta sauce or the depth of a savory soup or stew. Generally, these ingredients add to the dish by providing a new dimension of flavor. Learning to use these allow us to transform meals prepared at home into even more flavorful and robust dishes.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 2.45 mb
Pages: 4



AEN-139

Kentucky Wind Directions and Magnitudes: A Tool for Siting Barns

5/13/2019 (new)
Authors: Matthew Dixon, Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Wind is variable in time and space. This is especially true across the state of Kentucky, considering the geographical variety from the Eastern Kentucky mountains to the flatter grain production region in Western Kentucky. In particular, there is a region of potentially variable wind around Cincinnati, near the Ohio River. In trying to account for this variability, monthly wind maps across the state of Kentucky have been developed using the past 30 years of recorded wind data. These data can be used to assist in site evaluations for barns and planning farmstead layouts. Knowing wind speed and direction will help optimize the natural ventilation taking place within agricultural buildings.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 2.02 mb
Pages: 3



HO-122

Go with the Flow: Simple Calculations for Drip Irrigation

5/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Brent Rowell

While drip irrigation is relatively easy, information about drip irrigation is often more complicated and confusing than it needs to be. Well-meaning professors and engineers use terms like "head" and "flow rate" without explaining exactly what they mean and how they are used. And it's often difficult to get help planning a small farm system in states without large irrigated acreages and irrigation traditions. The purpose of this bulletin is to help farmers understand the simple calculations involved in designing a small drip irrigation system.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 6



CLD3-2

Delivering Your Marketing Message: Planning Productive Promotions

5/8/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Jennifer Bridge, Ken Culp, Janet Johnson

Effective marketing messages build awareness and interest in an organization's programs, products, and services. Successful promotions begin with a plan to deliver the right message to the right people for greatest participation and impact.

Departments: 4-H Programs, Allen County, Community and Leadership Development, County Extension, Meade County
Series: Using Leadership Skills to Improve Quality of Life (CLD3 series)
Tags:
Size: 202 kb
Pages: 4



CLD3-3

Building Your Marketing Toolkit

5/8/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Jennifer Bridge, Ken Culp, Janet Johnson

To begin assembling your organization's marketing toolkit, ask the following question: What are the most basic and useful tools that could be implemented to market our organization, its programs and activities?

Departments: 4-H Programs, Allen County, Community and Leadership Development, County Extension, Meade County
Series: Using Leadership Skills to Improve Quality of Life (CLD3 series)
Tags:
Size: 185 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-80

Hops

5/3/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Hop (Humulus lupulus) is a native herbaceous plant with a perennial crown and annual climbing stems (bines). Bines are similar to vines; however, bines wind around a support structure and lack the suckers or tendrils typical of vines. Hop crowns can survive for 25 years or more; however, the fast growing bines die back to the ground each winter. Bines can reach a height of 15 to 30 feet in a single growing season. Hops are valued for their female cones, which contain the resins and essential oils used to provide the distinctive flavor, aroma and bitterness to beer.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 6



ASC-242

Composting Poultry Litter in Your Backyard

5/2/2019 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Keeping laying hens in the backyard is popular, but along with a daily supply of eggs, the hens also produce a large supply of manure. Fresh poultry manure has an unpleasant odor and will attract flies. Bedding material, such as pine shavings, is put down on the coop floor to help control odors and flies, but eventually the litter (manure and bedding material) needs to be replaced. While poultry manure can be an excellent fertilizer, it should not be used fresh. "Raw" manure can burn plants and may contain pathogens that could contaminate any plants being grown for consumption. Composting makes the manure safe to use as a fertilizer on any lawn or garden. Composting involves a process by which billions of beneficial soil organisms decompose the organic material. Simply piling up waste is not really composting. With the right proportions for materials, the process has minimal offensive odor and destroys most of the pathogens in the manure. Compost is both science and art.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, poultry
Size: 893 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-OR-T-7

Kentucky Turfgrass Disease Calendar

5/1/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Paul Vincelli

A graphic representation showing the times of year that diseases of cool-season grasses are likely.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Turf Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-T series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 161 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-MP-17

Grower Cooperatives (Co-ops)

4/25/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

ooperatives have historically been utilized to market wholesale quantities of produce in Kentucky. In the early 2000s, as many as four grower co-ops in Kentucky were actively marketing tomatoes, melons, sweet corn, cabbage, bell peppers, pumpkins and other crops to wholesale buyers. By 2006, however, produce marketing by grower co-ops had largely disappeared from Kentucky's produce industry, with only one co-op still operating as growers found other ways to market produce. The involvement of co-ops in marketing produce from Kentucky has since been limited. Cooperatives remain a potential form of business organization for specialty crop growers located in a similar geographic area. Producers interested in exploring the cooperative business structure can investigate resources available from the Kentucky Center for Agriculture and Rural Development (KCARD), which is recognized by USDA Rural Development as a cooperative development center.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.71 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-628

Savor the Flavor: Cooking with Oils and Vinegars

4/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Annhall Norris, Janet Tietyen-Mullins

Oils and vinegars are perfect for adding great flavor and health benefits to any dish. There are many different types of oils and vinegars to cook with that can be both flavorful and healthy. Oils are known for their anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and antioxidant properties. Vinegars have been used for centuries for their "healing" properties because of the antioxidants that they contain as well. Knowing what types to use for different dishes is the best way to get started in adding more flavor to your meals.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 741 kb
Pages: 6



ID-128

Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky, 2019

4/16/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Emily Pfeufer, John Strang, Mark Williams, Shawn Wright

A well-planned and properly kept garden should produce 600 to 700 pounds of produce per 1,000 square feet and may include many different crops. Consult "Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens" (ID-133) for the latest recommendations on home vegetable varieties.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 4.00 mb
Pages: 48



FCS3-582

Home Canning Pickles and Fermented Foods

4/11/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Debbie Clouthier

The home canning of pickles, relishes, and fermented foods allows you to enjoy the bounty of your summer garden or local farmers market year-round. It may also save you money and give you some control over what's in your food. To ensure safe, high-quality home-canned products, always follow research-based recommendations when canning.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 484 kb
Pages: 23



AEN-138

Protecting Pastured Cattle using Windbreaks and Mounds

4/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Research shows that cattle benefit from summer shade and winter shelter. Pastured cattle seek shelter around structures, under trees, and in forested streamside zones. These areas are often heavily trafficked and become muddy, compacted loafing areas. Mud creates further stress on cattle and compounds the problems of temperature stress and feed inefficiencies. One option that could be used to lure cattle from these areas and provide winter shelter and summer shade is a constructed windbreak fence on a mound.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures
Size: 1.80 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-77

Bamboo

4/9/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Bamboo is the general name used for a number of perennial, woody-stemmed grasses. Native cane (Arundinaria gigantea), which is commonly referred to as river cane, grows naturally in Kentucky and throughout much of the Southeast. It is one of three bamboo species native to North America. There are more than a hundred introduced species that can be grown in the U.S., with growth habits ranging from low-growing groundcovers to full-sized trees that reach a height of over 30 feet at maturity. Bamboos are well known for their vigorous growth and variety of uses.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-580

Home Canning Tomatoes and Tomato Products

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Annhall Norris

Home canning tomatoes and tomato products can help you save money and gain control over what's in your food while preserving the bounty of summer for your family's year-round enjoyment. The recipes included in this publication are research-based for safe home canning.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 418 kb
Pages: 15



PPFS-FR-S-20

Commercial Grape Fungicide Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guides

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

A fungicide schedule worksheet and two sample spray guides for commercial grape growers.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags:
Size: 427 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-FR-T-19

Commercial Apple Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

A sample spray guide and spray schedule worksheet.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 337 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-GEN-7

Homeowner's Guide to Fungicides

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kenny Seebold, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Diseases in home gardens, orchards, and landscapes do not always cause total losses, but they can be serious problems if left unmanaged. As a rule, chemicals are not recommended as the only means of disease control for homeowners. Cultural practices such as sanitation, irrigation management, attention to plant health, rotation, and selection of disease-resistant varieties are usually enough to control diseases. Chemicals may be required, though, and should be used as a supplement to good management practices.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 491 kb
Pages: 5



PPFS-GEN-8

Simplified Fungicide Guide for Backyard Fruit

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Nicole Ward Gauthier

This fungicide spray guide is intended as a supplement to the more detailed spray schedule available in Disease and Insect Control Programs for Homegrown Fruit in Kentucky, Including Organic Alternatives, ID-21.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 431 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-19

Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 995 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-20

Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 896 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-21

Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 874 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-22

Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 460 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-23

Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, production practices, sustainabable agriculture, vegetables
Size: 788 kb
Pages: 2



CLD3-1

Marketing Your Organization: The Power of Image

3/27/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Jennifer Bridge, Ken Culp, Janet Johnson

Communities embrace and support organizations that implement an effective marketing plan. An effective marketing plan helps organizations communicate their purpose and build an image through branding.

Departments: 4-H Programs, Allen County, Community and Leadership Development, County Extension, Meade County
Series: Using Leadership Skills to Improve Quality of Life (CLD3 series)
Tags:
Size: 160 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-56

Bedding Plants

3/26/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Hundreds of different annuals, perennials, herbs and vegetable transplants can be grown and sold as bedding plants. In general, the term 'bedding plant' refers to any plant that is produced and sold for planting in the landscape, garden or large containers (such as patio pots).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-578

Home Canning Basics

3/22/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Annhall Norris

People choose to can foods at home for many reasons: to preserve the harvest from their gardens or local farmers markets for year-round enjoyment; to gain more control over what is in their food by limiting or avoiding salt, sugar or preservatives; to save money; to get better-tasting canned foods; to follow family traditions; or just for the sense of satisfaction that home canning provides.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 347 kb
Pages: 7



FCS3-627

Sensational Salads

3/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Jennifer Bridge, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Salads have been a mainstay in meal planning for years as they add color, texture, and freshness. Salads are also a great way to incorporate a variety of vegetables and other healthy foods into meals. While a basic garden salad is still a good choice, creative dishes have been introduced, moving salads into something more than a side dish.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences, Meade County
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags: food and nutrition, food preparation
Size: 1.27 mb
Pages: 4



RB-338

Commercial Feeds in Kentucky, 2018

3/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Glen Harrison

Kentucky's commercial feed law provides protection for the state's livestock, poultry, and pet owners by regulating all feed materials offered for sale or for mixing into a feed. Products falling under regulation include all types of pet foods, livestock minerals, complete animal and poultry feeds, protein or mineral blocks, supplements, feed ingredients, specialty materials such as drug premixes, vitamin and mineral supplements, liquid feeds, pet supplements, pet treats, and other specialized pet foods. The law does provide for exemptions for whole and unprocessed grain, raw meat, hay, straw, stover, silage, cobs, husks, and hulls when not processed.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 1.35 mb
Pages: 36



AGR-239

Calibrating Boom Sprayers for Turf Applications

3/12/2019 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Calibrating application equipment is something many people avoid because they believe it is too time consuming or that the math involved is too confusing. Calibration, however, is critical. Applying too little can result in poor pest control and can lead to pesticide resistance. Whereas, over applying can be bad for the environment, damage the grass, and wastes money. There are several methods for calibrating sprayers. Choose the one that makes the most sense to you. Three different methods are described below. All these methods are reliable and will provide very similar application accuracy.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, turfgrass
Size: 1.08 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-137

Gourds

3/12/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Gourds, which are related to pumpkins and squash, are generally grown for their hard outer rind. The fruit is dried for fall decorations, handicrafts and functional items. The various types of gourds include hard-shell gourds (Lagenaria spp.; used for dippers, containers and birdhouses), soft-shell gourds (Cucurbita pepo; decorative and ornamental uses), and luffa gourds (their soft interior fiber is used like a sponge).

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 3



PPFS-OR-W-27

Canker Sampling of Trees and Woody Ornamentals

3/1/2019 (new)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Cankers on woody plants can result in dieback, decline, structural failure, or plant death. Cankers form when plant pathogens enter woody tissues. Plants stressed by poor planting practices, improper maintenance, extreme weather, insect damage, mechanical damage, or other wounds are at increased risk for infection by canker causing pathogens.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 5



AEN-137

Farm Gates: Design Considerations

2/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Farm gates are a necessity for controlling traffic and increasing security. There are many design considerations for optimizing a system of farm gates. Very few gates incorporate all the recommended design components that will be discussed in this publication. However, to move people, materials, equipment, and livestock through a gateway, the gateway should economize time, be navigable, and operate in an efficient manner. Time spent operating a poorly designed gateway is time wasted and a hindrance to production. This publication is a guide to aid producers in creating more functional designs for gateways.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures
Size: 2.50 mb
Pages: 6



HENV-202

Planting Along Your Stream, Pond, or Lake

2/11/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Ashley Osborne

Kentucky has more than 90,000 miles of rivers and streams and thousands of ponds, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands. You can improve your surroundings and the quality of your stream, pond, or lake by planting an area called a riparian buffer or buffer zone.

Departments: Ag Programs, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Tags:
Size: 3.99 mb
Pages: 8



HENV-203

Stormwater

2/11/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Ashley Osborne

As stormwater moves across lawns and paved areas, it picks up bacteria, nutrients, sediments, heavy metals, and chemicals before traveling through the storm sewers to our water bodies. Because the stormwater is not cleaned or treated, it creates harmful conditions for the environment and for us.

Departments: Ag Programs, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Tags:
Size: 3.68 mb
Pages: 8



HENV-204

What is a Watershed?

2/11/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ashley Osborne

A watershed is an area of land that drains water to a single water body. Watersheds are as small as a few acres draining into a stream or as large as several states draining into the ocean. Smaller watersheds join together to make larger watersheds. Kentucky is divided into seven major watersheds, or basins. Knowing what watershed you live in is a first step toward protecting water quality.

Departments: Ag Programs
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Tags:
Size: 4.31 mb
Pages: 8



ID-242

Central Kentucky Backyard Stream Guide

2/11/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Amanda A. Gumbert, Chris Sass

Many urban homeowners are not sure what to do about the stream in their backyard. Who owns it? How can I take care of it? What plants are good for my streambanks? These common questions lead to some confusing answers. This publication is designed to help the homeowner of a backyard stream appreciate this resource, protect personal property, and improve water quality and habitat.

Departments: Ag Programs, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Landscape Architecture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 15.70 mb
Pages: 24



CCD-CP-2

Apples

2/5/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Over the past 40 years Kentucky growers have produced apples (Malus domestica) using free-standing trees in low to medium density plantings. Today's high density orchards have closely planted trees on dwarfing rootstocks requiring permanent support structures. Earlier production, quicker returns on the investment, and improved fruit quality are just a few of the many benefits of the new high-density systems.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-621

Carbohydrates and Athletic Performance

2/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

Carbohydrates are one of the most important nutrients an athlete can consume. Carbohydrates provide the energy needed to help an athlete reach their peak athletic potential during a vigorous training session or when competing.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 555 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-622

Dietary Fat and Athletic Performance

2/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

When someone hears the word fat they usually think of body fat. However, the fats we eat can serve an important role in our health and physical fitness. Fats that we eat (also called lipids) are more than just fried food and butter. Other sources can provide benefits that are especially important in athletic performance.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 899 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-623

Hydration and Athletic Performance

2/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

The best performance enhancer for athletes that doesn't cost money is water. However, many athletes overlook the importance of this essential nutrient.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 349 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-624

Protein and Athletic Performance

2/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

Whether you are a powerlifter, endurance athlete or somewhere in-between, all athletes need to be sure they are eating enough protein. When engaged in intense physical activity, the body needs protein to repair and grow damaged muscles and build more muscle tissue.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.06 mb
Pages: 3



ID-232

Midwest Tree and Small Fruit Spray Guide, 2019-20

2/1/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Daniel Becker, Ric Bessin, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

This guide provides pest management recommendations for commercial tree fruit, small fruit, and grape producers in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. These recommendations have been formulated to provide up-to-date information on pesticides and their application. This publication replaces two previous annual publications: The Midwest Tree Fruit Spray Guide (ID-168) and The Midwest Small Fruit and Grape Spray Guide (ID-169).

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases
Size: 3.50 mb
Pages: 168



FCS3-625

Supplements and Athletic Performance

1/31/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

Most supplements advertised to enhance athletic performance do not work and their claims exceed reality. The few products that do work typically only do so when an athlete is lacking nutrients from their diet and taken carefully. Also, some supplements are banned by the NCAA and can be very dangerous if not used properly. Some of the more popular and safe supplements are discussed below, with tips to help you decide if taking them is right for you.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 517 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-626

Vitamins, Minerals, and Athletic Performance

1/31/2019 (new)
Authors: Kyle Flack, Harry Hays, Jack Moreland

he main source of vitamins and minerals come from a fruits and vegetables. However, certain vitamins and minerals are especially important for athletic performance. These include B-vitamins, iron, zinc, selenium, and the electrolytes including sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 446 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-PFS-4

Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Part 2

1/29/2019 (new)
Authors: Bryan Brady, Badrinath Vengari Jagannathan, Mari Schroeder, Paul Vijayakumar

Although the compliance dates for the Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water have been extended, growers are encouraged to start familiarizing themselves with the process of water sampling. In continuation to Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Introduction that discussed the different types of water sources, how to calculate a water sample and a brief overview of how to properly take a sample, this paper will explain in detail how and where to take water samples for testing. In addition, it will also provide details on how to read and understand the results of your water test and how to build a water profile. Finally, it will include a list and map with the locations of all labs with approved methods to make compliance as simple as possible.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Food Connection
Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-PFS series)
Tags:
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 5



FCS8-119

Healthy Bladder Habits Might Help You

1/28/2019 (new)
Authors: Natalie Jones, Janet Kurzynske, Joann Liankhammy, Sarah Martin, Jean Najor

It is likely that 13 million people in the US suffer from regular urine leaks. Many more women have the issue than men. Some women leak daily, while others may have the issue once-in-a-while. You may fall somewhere in between. Urinary incontinence (UI) can happen at any age, but occurrences increase in young adulthood and steadily rise in older adults. A combination of embarrassment and belief that UI is a natural part of ageing and childbirth, prevent women from speaking with a healthcare professional. Women should not ignore UI, as treatment can be relatively simple and often effective.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Health and Wellness (FCS8 series)
Tags:
Size: 309 kb
Pages: 5



AEN-136

Fence Line Stiles, Escapes, and Refuges

1/23/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Michele McHugh, Lee Moser

Opening farm gates for trucks, tractors, equipment, and livestock is unavoidable. However, opening a large gate, or a set of gates, for a person on foot is extremely inefficient, especially if the entrance does not put the producer where they need to be. An inconveniently located gate can lead to additional steps and unnecessary movements. Opening gates may require dealing with clasps, chains, or ropes just to get the gate unfastened. The gate may then have to be lifted or dragged open and closed. The bottom-line is that entering a poorly installed and unmaintained gateway can make the experience of opening and closing gates a time consuming nuisance.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures
Size: 9.30 mb
Pages: 4



PR-755

2017 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

1/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Win Dunwell, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, Dewayne Ingram, Dan Potter, Raul Villanueva, Paul Vincelli, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Tim Woods

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 9.30 mb
Pages: 38



CCD-CP-16

Plasticulture Strawberries

1/16/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Shawn Wright

Fresh strawberries (Fragaria spp.) are a consumer favorite, and growers able to provide the earliest local strawberry crop often have the marketing edge. The annual plasticulture system can produce strawberries in Kentucky about one month sooner than the traditional matted row system. This can give an advantage to growers willing to invest time and resources into annual plasticulture strawberry production, which can either be used as a stand-alone enterprise or as part of a diversified operation. However, plasticulture production requires careful attention to details and involves more risk than matted row production due to earlier fruit ripening and a greater potential for frost losses.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 696 kb
Pages: 3



RB-337

Seed Inspection Report, 2018

1/16/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

The Division of Regulatory Services is charged with administering the Kentucky Seed Law and Regulations, a "truth-in-labeling" law requiring basic labeling of seed components and quality factors to inform producers and consumers about the attributes of seed lots offered for sale in Kentucky. Our regulatory program protects the seed industry and consumers through inspection, sampling and analysis of seed products in Kentucky.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 1.85 mb
Pages: 35



CCD-CP-9

High Tunnel Blueberries

1/15/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels are relatively simple polyethylene-covered structures placed over irrigated ground beds. Also known as hoop houses, high tunnels have been used to extend the marketing window of a wide variety of annual crops in Kentucky, such as vegetables and cut flowers. Perennial crops, such as brambles, can also be produced in high tunnels

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 6



CCD-FS-9

High Tunnel Planting Calendar

1/14/2019 (new)
Authors: Josh Knight, Rachel Rudolph

This publication was developed to be provided with the High Tunnel Planting Calendar and not meant to be a comprehensive guide to high tunnel production. The reader should consult the Center for Crop Diversification (CCD) Publication titled High Tunnel Overview (CCD-SP-2) for a concise guide on the use and principles of high tunnel production and season extension.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags:
Size: 858 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-IG-1

High Tunnel Planting Calendar (Region 1)

1/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Josh Knight, Rachel Rudolph

A calendar to aid high tunnel growers in Western and far Eastern Kentucky determine approximate times to direct seed, transplant, and harvest annual crops.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Info-graphics: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-IG series)
Tags:
Size: 14.60 mb
Pages: 2



CCD-IG-2

High Tunnel Planting Calendar (Region 2)

1/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Josh Knight, Rachel Rudolph

A calendar to aid high tunnel growers in Central and parts of Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky determine approximate times to direct seed, transplant, and harvest annual crops.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Info-graphics: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-IG series)
Tags:
Size: 13.30 mb
Pages: 2



CCD-IG-3

High Tunnel Planting Calendar (Region 3)

1/10/2019 (new)
Authors: Josh Knight, Rachel Rudolph

A calendar to aid high tunnel growers in parts of Eastern Kentucky determine approximate times to direct seed, transplant, and harvest annual crops.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Info-graphics: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-IG series)
Tags:
Size: 13.60 mb
Pages: 2



4NB-01LO

4-H Bee Ambassador Program

1/8/2019 (new)
Authors: Blake Newton, Ashley Osborne

The 4-H Bee Ambassador Program addresses key concepts related to bees, pollination, beekeeping, and honey. Kentucky 4-H agents, assistants, and volunteer leaders are encouraged to incorporate lessons and activities related to bees and honey in their clubs, school enrichment programs, and community outreach events. Twelve lessons are included in this guide, each are geared towards youth ages 9 to 18 years old.

Departments: Ag Programs, Entomology
Series: 4-H Insects (4NB series)
Tags:
Size: 4.62 mb
Pages: 80



CCD-CP-74

Turfgrass Sod Production

1/2/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Sod production involves growing a solid stand of high quality turfgrass and then harvesting the grass along with roots and a thin layer of topsoil. Many sod producers also transport and install the sod. The primary markets for sod are landscapers and building contractors. Sod is used in parks, golf courses, athletic fields, schools, garden centers, home lawns, road construction sites, commercial properties, and cemeteries. The 2014 USDA Census of Horticultural Specialties reported slightly less than 1,000 acres of sod harvested in Kentucky. The value of sod sales in Kentucky was split almost evenly between wholesale and retail sales.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 3



PPFS-FR-T-7

Plant Diseases of Fruit Prediction Models for Kentucky Counties

1/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Evan Tate, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Numerous plant diseases impact fruit crops throughout Kentucky. Factors such as plant growth stage, as well as rainfall, temperature, and other weather conditions, can be used to determine risk for plant disease. Prediction models are critical tools for growers, as they allow for protective management strategies to be deployed when disease risk is high. Use of these models can provide growers with cost savings, as unnecessary chemical applications are eliminated when risk of infection is low.

Departments: Hancock County, Plant Pathology
Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.59 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-620

Talking Turkey: Dinner is Served

12/20/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf, Annhall Norris

There are several ways to cook your turkey. One way is not necessarily better than the other. It depends on your preference. Traditionally, turkeys are baked in the oven. They can be baked in a roasting pan or an oven safe plastic bag. They can be cooked in a roaster oven, deep fried, or even cooked in the microwave.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 472 kb
Pages: 5



FCS3-619

Talking Turkey: Prep and Safety

12/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

For many, Thanksgiving dinner is the largest meal prepared all year. So much time and effort go into planning the meal. There are decorations, place settings, the side dishes, the guest list, and the turkey! It's easy to see how one could feel overwhelmed with preparing the turkey with so many other things to think about.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.14 mb
Pages: 5



ID-252

Equine Cushing's Disease or PPID

12/18/2018 (new)
Authors: Amanda Adams, Fernanda Camargo, Ashton Miller

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is one of the most common endocrine diseases in horses, generally affecting those over the age of 15 years. It is also frequently referred to as Equine Cushing's Disease. PPID is caused by degenerative changes in an area of the brain known as the pituitary gland, hence the name of the disease. This gland is located at the base of the brain. In horses with PPID, the specific section of the pituitary gland that is most affected is called the pars intermedia. Unfortunately, in horses with PPID, changes occur within this gland, which results in increased production of a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: horses, nutrition and health
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 3



PR-759

Kentucky Corn Silage Hybrid Performance Report, 2018

12/18/2018 (new)
Authors: Ricky Arnett, Matthew Campbell, Chad Lee, Linda McClanahan, Nick Roy, Julia Santoro, Will Stallard

The objective of the Silage Corn Hybrid Performance Test is to provide unbiased forage yield and quality data for corn hybrids commonly grown for silage in Kentucky.

Departments: Adair County, Green County, Lincoln County, Mason County, Mercer County, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, other crops, research, variety trials
Size: 196 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-136

Organic Cucurbits

12/13/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Cucurbits, vegetables in the family Cucurbitacae, include cucumber, pumpkin, squash, muskmelon and watermelon. Certified organic cucurbits are produced without using synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, according to organic crop production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). For more information on the exact requirements to be organic certified in Kentucky, please visit the Kentucky Department of Agriculture website. Growers commercially producing cucurbits in Kentucky's climate must manage key insect pests such as cucumber beetle and squash bug as well as economically important diseases such as bacterial wilt, cucurbit yellow vine decline, powdery mildew, and downy mildew. This profile provides an overview of organic cucurbit production in Kentucky, including market demand potential, key production considerations, and baseline economics

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 2.09 mb
Pages: 5



PR-757

2018 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/13/2018 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Ric Bessin, Krista Jacobsen, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, John Snyder, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collec-tion of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, vegetables
Size: 6.84 mb
Pages: 44



PR-758

2018 Kentucky Soybean Performance Tests

12/11/2018 (new)
Authors: Claire Venard

The Kentucky Soybean Variety Performance Tests are conducted to provide an unbiased and objective estimate of the relative performance of soybean varieties commercially available in Kentucky. This information may be used by growers and seed producers to aid in selecting varieties that will give the highest total production in a specific situation. Soybean cultivars in the 2018 tests were entered by soybean growers, commercial companies, state and federal institutions. Forty soybean tests were planted in 2018 in Kentucky, at the eight test locations shown below. However, due to weed pressure, one location was discontinued.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, soybeans, variety trials
Size: 2.90 mb
Pages: 26



RB-336

Annual Report Analyses of Official Fertilizer Samples July 2017 - June 2018

12/11/2018 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

This bulletin presents the results of the analysis of 2,703 official samples of commercial fertilizer taken during the period of July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018 by the field inspection staff. The samples represented approximately 53,288 tons of fertilizer out of the approximately 1,043,565 tons sold during this period. The Laboratory made 2,306 nitrogen, 1,864 phosphorus, 1,943 potassium, and 1,398 secondary and minor element and certain other analyses on these samples. Table 1 shows the manufacturers whose product the field inspection staff sampled, along with the number of samples taken and the percentage of those samples that passed. Table 2 shows the detailed N, P2O5, and K2O analyses of samples of mixed fertilizers and fertilizer materials. Table 3 contains the results of secondary and minor element and certain other analyses. Table 4 is a listing of companies or licensees registered or licensed to sell fertilizer in Kentucky as of June 30, 2018.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags:
Size: 3.00 mb
Pages: 150



CCD-CP-114

Pumpkins

12/10/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The name "pumpkin" is commonly applied to any plant in the taxonomically diverse Cucurbita genus that produces the characteristic yellow to orange, round fruit. Pumpkin cultivars may belong to one of several species: Cucurbita pepo, C. maxima, C. moschata and C. mixta.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 3



ASC-237

Breeding Habits of the Ewe

12/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Debra Aaron, Don Ely

Reproduction is the beginning of a series of significant events involved in the production of lambs for market. Obviously, the higher the reproduction rate in ewes, the greater the chances of achieving maximum profit. A knowledge of the mating (breeding) habits of the ewe can improve the chances for higher reproductive rates, marketing more pounds of lamb per ewe, increasing the efficiency of labor use, and ultimately increasing the chances of greater profit.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, sheep
Size: 700 kb
Pages: 3



ASC-238

Beginning a Sheep Operation

12/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Debra Aaron, Don Ely

Kentucky has the resources required for successful sheep production systems. The state has a vast forage production potential, under-utilized labor and facilities, and access to a well-established market. Many Kentucky farmers should consider the sheep enterprise and its benefits, particularly if they want to make more efficient use of their forages, labor, and facilities. In developing this enterprise, the following must be considered: feed supply, labor, facilities and equipment, foundation stock, and the production system.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, sheep
Size: 675 kb
Pages: 6



PR-753

2018 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The major factor in selecting a variety of summer annual grass is yield, both total and seasonal. Growth after first cutting is strongly dependent on available moisture and nitrogen fertilization. Summer annual grasses generally have different characteristics and uses. The major factors in selecting cool season cereal grass varieties are yield, winter survival and regrowth.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 24



PR-754

2018 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 3.10 mb
Pages: 28



ASC-241

Urban Poultry

12/4/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

The terms urban poultry and backyard poultry both refer to flocks kept on a residential lot. Keeping chickens in urban areas is becoming increasingly popular throughout the country. The main reasons given for keeping chickens are as pets and for egg production--pets with benefits. Small numbers of hens kept in the backyard can provide an urban family with entertainment, eggs, and fertilizer. For those with children, backyard poultry flocks can also teach them responsibility and be used for 4-H poultry projects.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, poultry
Size: 2.24 mb
Pages: 6



CCD-CP-19

Strawberries

12/4/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

To many, nothing says summer like the first local ripe strawberries of the season. A versatile fruit, strawberries (Fragaria spp.) can be consumed fresh, frozen or in processed foods. Growers able to provide the earliest crop of these popular berries will often have the marketing edge

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 3



ID-160

Burley and Dark Tobacco Production Guide, 2019-2020

12/4/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Andy Bailey, Ric Bessin, Lowell Bush, J.D. Green, Ann Jack, Bob Miller, Bob Pearce, Mark Purschwitz, Will Snell, Larry Swetnam

Under ideal conditions, growing a good crop of tobacco is relatively easy, but when conditions are challenging it takes good management skills and attention to detail to make tobacco a profitable crop. This publication is designed to provide the good manager with the latest information for the production of high yielding, good quality tobacco.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, tobacco
Size: 4.15 mb
Pages: 84



PR-752

2018 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

11/30/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 859 kb
Pages: 8



PR-746

2018 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on tall fescue varieties and similar grass species in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting tall fescue varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all tall fescue and bromegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 17 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.28 mb
Pages: 12



PR-747

2018 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides maturity and yield data on timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky. Tables 10 and 11 show summaries of all timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 546 kb
Pages: 6



PR-748

2018 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on annual and perennial ryegrass varieties in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting varieties. Tables 15, 16, and 17 show summaries of all annual and perennial ryegrass and festulolium varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 17 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 16



PR-749

2018 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. Table 5 shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 18 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 350 kb
Pages: 4



PR-750

2018 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. Table 10 shows a summary of all white clover varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 15 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 504 kb
Pages: 6



PR-751

2018 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.45 mb
Pages: 14



ID-196

UK Ag Equine Programs Calendar, 2019

11/26/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Shane Bogle, Fernanda Camargo, Nick Carter, Katheryn Cerny, Bob Coleman, Karen Douglas, Jimmy Henning, Christopher Jeffcoat, Paula Jerrell, Glenn Mackie, Brian Newman, Jason Phillips, Don Sorrell, Daniel Wilson

The information in this calendar is provided to aid owners in planning for the care and use of their horses. When necessary, information is discussed in the month prior to application to allow horse owners adequate time to plan for activities such as weed control, soil testing, and vaccinations. Contact your local veterinarian for health-related issues and your county extension agent for further information.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Ballard County, Caldwell County, Campbell County, County Extension, Fayette County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Simpson County, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: horses
Size: 12.00 mb
Pages: 32



PR-745

2018 Orchardgrass Report

11/20/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties. Table 11 shows a summary of all orchardgrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and from a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 898 kb
Pages: 8



CCD-CP-125

Watermelon

11/19/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Shubin Saha

Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a warm-season crop in the Cucurbit family. Watermelons are grown across the state, including larger areas in Casey County, Lincoln County, Hart County, Allen County and Daviess County. Kentucky farms annually harvest more than 1,000 watermelon acres, the Commonwealth's second largest fresh market vegetable by area.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 4



PR-743

2018 Alfalfa Report

11/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 12



PR-744

2018 Red and White Clover Report

11/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 12 and 13 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 925 kb
Pages: 8



CCD-CP-15

Peaches

11/15/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The peach (Prunus persica), which originated in China, is a member of the rose family. In the past, commercial peach production in Kentucky has been profitable only in western counties, in southern counties, and in areas along the Ohio River. However, over the past 15 years as winters have become warmer, peach growers are also doing well in areas west of the mountains, as long as good sites that avoid late spring frosts are selected.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.49 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-238

Establishing and Managing Bermudagrasses in the Transition Zone

11/12/2018 (new)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, Travis Shaddox

Bermudagrasses have been successfully grown on athletic fields and golf courses in the transition zone for many years. Although each year some level of winterkill threat exists, bermudagrass remains an excellent surface for golf and sports. Seeded varieties of bermudagrasses have been the most common choices in Kentucky due to the availability of seed of good varieties as well as the ease of planting seed versus living plant material. There are, however, several outstanding vegetative bermudagrass cultivars that are adapted to the transition zone.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, turfgrass
Size: 900 kb
Pages: 3



ASC-240

Blanketing Horses: Do's and Don'ts

11/1/2018 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

Blanketing can be a hot-button topic among horse owners and caretakers. Some people are adamant about blanketing and some people are the exact opposite: unyielding about not-blanketing their horses in the winter. So the question remains, do horses NEED to be blanketed when the weather turns cold?

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: horses
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 5



CCD-MP-9

Marketing Organic Produce

10/26/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

This fact sheet summarizes concerns for Kentucky produce growers that are interested in beginning or expanding the marketing of organic produce. It is intended only as a starting point; further information will be found through various university and government resources and by consulting with experienced growers of organic produce.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 5



PR-756

2018 Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test

10/26/2018 (new)
Authors: Cam Kenimer, Chad Lee, M.W. Piersawl

The objective of the Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test is to provide relative performance estimates of hybrid seed corn sold in Kentucky. The test attempts to treat every hybrid similarly in an unbiased manner. Agronomic practices that meet or exceed university guidelines are implemented at each location.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, research, variety trials
Size: 2.83 mb
Pages: 28



ASC-239

Warm Up Ring Etiquette

10/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Fernanda Camargo

While it is understood that the warm up ring is a chaotic place to be, warm up ring etiquette should be expected at every show, and taught in every lesson program. A good warm up is extremely important for the health of the horse, and it helps the rider and horse to get acclimated with the new environment. So in the name of having a more productive ride both in the warm up ring and then later in the show ring, there are some rules (sometimes untold rules) that everyone should follow.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: horses
Size: 210 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-542

Diabetes and Hemoglobin A1C

10/24/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Ingrid Adams, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Diabetes is often called a "silent disease" because it can cause serious complications without symptoms. A person with diabetes may feel healthy and still have too high a level of blood glucose. It is important to know how well you are managing your blood glucose level.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 132 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-543

Diabetes and High Blood Pressure

10/24/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Ingrid Adams, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Two out of three adults living with diabetes also have high blood pressure. High blood pressure has no symptoms. It may be difficult to tell if your blood pressure is high. A person may have high blood pressure for years and not know it.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 190 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-546

Carbohydrate Counting

10/24/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ingrid Adams, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Carbohydrate (carb) counting is a way of keeping track of the amount of carbohydrates you get from the foods you eat. Carbohydrate counting can help you manage your blood glucose level.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 677 kb
Pages: 8



FCS3-548

Think Your Plate

10/24/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ingrid Adams, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Making the right food choices is a great way for people with diabetes to control their blood glucose. Managing blood glucose helps reduce the risk for health complications.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 240 kb
Pages: 2



ID-235

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky

10/17/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, John Obrycki, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, Shubin Saha, Shawn Wright

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, nursery and landscape, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 28



PR-741

2012 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

10/11/2018 (new)
Authors: Paul Bachi, Julie Beale, Jennie Condra, Emily Dobbs, Win Dunwell, Bob Geneve, Dewayne Ingram, Brenda Kennedy, Katie Kittrell, Janet Lensing, Sara Long, Susmitha Nambuthiri, John Obrycki, Dan Potter, Nicole Ward Gauthier

The 2012 Nursery and Landscape Research Report includes research in the areas of production and economics, ecology, and pest control.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, research
Size: 2.23 mb
Pages: 20



CCD-CP-73

Ornamental Grasses

9/26/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Ornamental grasses are popular for use in commercial and homeowner landscapes. Attractive foliage, showy flowers and distinctive seed heads make many annual and perennial grasses suitable for fresh and dried floral arrangements. Ornamental grasses can be added to an existing nursery operation or become the focus of a specialty nursery.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 3



ID-251

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Brambles in Kentucky

9/13/2018 (new)
Authors: Daniel Becker, Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, Matthew Springer, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pathogen and pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pathogens and pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring for diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The images included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky blackberry and raspberry plantings.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Mercer County, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, insect pests, plant diseases, weeds
Size: 2.50 mb
Pages: 32



CCD-CP-5

Elderberry

9/12/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadnesis) is a large shrub or small tree native to Kentucky. The small fruit has prominent seeds and are produced in large clusters. While elderberries are not normally eaten fresh due to their tartness, wild and cultivated elderberries can be processed, either alone or with other fruit.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-121

Summer Squash

9/10/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Summer squashes (Curcurbita pepo) are warm-season cucurbits that are harvested when the fruits are immature. The most common summer squash types include yellow (crookneck and straightneck) and zucchini. Also included in the summer squash group are scallop squashes and cocozelle. Summer squashes grow on plants with a bush growth habit, rather than vining.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-618

Sweet Enough Without All That Sugar

9/10/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Sweeteners have been around since the earliest history of man and provided carbohydrates as a source of energy. Fruit and honey were the first sweet foods available. Today, sugar is one of the most popular food additives in the United States. We know that the overindulgence of foods high in calories and low in nutrients can lead to chronic health problems. Even so, questions remain. How much sugar do I really need? What is the difference between sugars and artificial sweeteners? What part does sugar play in a healthy diet? Is life really sweet without all that sugar?

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.59 mb
Pages: 6



CCD-MP-24

Selected Internet Resources for Herb Marketing

9/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

This list of internet resources has been selected for the benefit of Kentucky commercial producers wanting to learn more about marketing herbs. The broad definition for herbs (herbaceous plants valued for their flavor, scent or medicinal properties) was used in gathering this information. These online resources are provided strictly for informative purposes only; the list does not constitute endorsement of herbal uses, products, businesses or cultural recommendations for herb production. Producers should always research herb production, uses and markets on their own before beginning production.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 630 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-539

Understanding Diabetes

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

Diabetes is a disease that affects 387 million people in the world, and this number is expected to double in the next 20 years. Approximately 46.3 percent of this population is undiagnosed. A diagnosis of diabetes is not a death sentence, but to remain in good health you must learn all you can about the disease and how to manage it.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 131 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-540

Managing Your Diabetes

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much glucose in the blood. The main goal for a person with diabetes is to keep his or her blood glucose under control. Diabetes management means learning all you can about the disease, maintaining a healthy weight, checking blood glucose three or more times a day, exercising, and/or taking medication as prescribed.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 131 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-541

Physical Activities and Diabetes

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

Physical activity plays an important part in the life of a person with diabetes. Being physically active helps you control your blood glucose and blood pressure. Taking part in physical activity provides protection against heart disease and stroke.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 177 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-544

Diabetes and Cholesterol

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

People with diabetes should pay attention to their cholesterol levels because high levels of blood cholesterol can lead to heart disease. People with diabetes are more likely to develop heart disease. When they do, they are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 143 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-549

Diabetes and the Healthcare Team

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

Diabetes is a disease that affects many parts of the body, such as the eyes, kidneys, blood vessels, heart, legs and feet. As a result, a team approach to taking care of the disease can be very helpful. When a team of individuals works together problems are identified earlier, and it is easier to reduce or prevent diabetes complications.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 197 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-550

Diabetes and Footcare

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

When blood glucose stays high for a long time it can cause problems for your feet, heart, eyes and kidneys. The main goal for people with diabetes is to keep their blood glucose within the target range set by the doctor or healthcare team. People with diabetes tend to have more problems with their feet. Checking your feet every day can prevent serious foot problems.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 493 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-551

Monitoring Blood Glucose

9/7/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Ingrid Adams

Keeping your blood glucose level within the target range set by you and your doctor reduces the risk of diabetes complications. It is important to check your blood glucose regularly so you can see how certain foods, activities and medicine affect your blood glucose level.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 163 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-AG-C-8

Diplodia Leaf Streak

9/1/2018 (new)
Authors: Nolan Anderson, Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Diplodia leaf streak of corn is a disease that has become more prevalent in Kentucky in recent years. It is commonly observed in fields in western Kentucky and is easily confused with other corn foliar diseases. Small, round, dark brown-to-tan lesions are first observed on leaves. Dark concentric rings may be observed in the center of early lesions at the infection site on the leaf. These lesions expand lengthwise in long streaks from the infection point and form elongated elliptical lesions. In severe cases, lesions can coalesce to blight large areas of affected leaves.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: mb
Pages: 3



FOR-131

A Checklist for Operators of Small Dry Kilns

8/31/2018 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

Drying air-dried hardwood lumber to the finished moisture content (MC) requires care and attention, but it's not difficult. This document describes the steps a kiln operator should follow to get the best lumber from his/her air-dried material. It will probably be most useful for operators of small kilns, but the principles are the same regardless of kiln size or type of kiln.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags: forestry, natural resources, timber
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 12



FOR-132

A Start-Up Guide for Operators of Small Dry Kilns

8/31/2018 (new)
Authors: Terry Conners

Step-by-step procedures so you can keep your dry kiln operation well-organized and running properly.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags: forestry, natural resources, timber
Size: 2.90 mb
Pages: 12



FCS3-611

Nutrition and Your Health

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

There is no doubt that our health and nutrition are important. But what exactly do these two words mean? And how are they related? In order to understand their relationship, we must be able to define what good health looks like and what it means to have good nutrition. Then, we can make healthy lifestyle choices each day that will help us prevent conditions and diseases related to poor nutrition.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.19 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-612

It Starts with Body Weight

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

We need certain amounts of fat in our body to be healthy. Body fat serves many purposes, including protecting and cushioning internal organs, especially during a fall. It makes chemical signals that regulate how much food we eat and the energy we use to live. Throughout history, fat has allowed humans to store energy for times when food was unavailable. But current obesity research indicates that too much body fat can negatively affect health.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 886 kb
Pages: 5



FCS3-613

Why Blood Sugar Matters

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Diabetes is a disease. It is not like the flu or a cold---you can't catch it from just being around your friends or family. It usually occurs when people have too much sugar in their blood and they cannot control their blood sugar level. If blood sugar levels are too high, it can be harmful to all parts of our bodies and keep us from doing the things we enjoy in life.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.61 mb
Pages: 5



FCS3-614

All About Blood Pressure

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Blood pressure is the amount of force caused by blood as it pushes through the blood vessels in the body. This pressure is created by the pumping action of the heart. Blood vessels are like small tubes with blood constantly flowing through them. In order for blood to flow to all parts of the body from the heart, there has to be enough force behind the blood for it to be pushed all the way down to our toes and all the way up to our brain. This is our blood pressure.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 988 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-615

Healthy Choices for a Healthy Heart

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Heart disease and cardiovascular disease are two terms that mean the same thing. These terms refer to all diseases of the heart and blood vessels. For example, heart disease includes heart attacks, strokes, atherosclerosis, heart failure, and other conditions of the heart and blood vessels. Many of these diseases have a similar underlying cause---a build-up of fat in blood vessels.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.08 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-616

Say Yes to Cancer Prevention

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Cancer is when damaged cells grow and divide uncontrollably in the body. These cancer cells can then spread to other parts of the body. These cells are unhealthy and they take over normal cells, making it hard for our body to function normally. Cancer is a word used to refer to several different, but related diseases. Usually cancer is named by what organ it affects first. For example, if cancer is found first in the lungs, it is called lung cancer.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 649 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-617

Breathe Easy with COPD

8/29/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, also known as COPD, is the 4th leading cause of death in Kentucky and in the United States. Almost 1 in 10 Kentucky adults have been diagnosed with COPD by a doctor and it is estimated that even more people are living with the disease and don't even know it. Although this disease can be deadly, simple changes in lifestyle can reduce your risk of developing the disease or improve your health if already diagnosed.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 274 kb
Pages: 3



CLD2-14

Understanding Community Health Through a Policy, Systems, and Environment Approach

8/14/2018 (new)
Authors: Daniel Kahl

Communities can host a complex array of interacting organizations, programs, services and resources. The existing policies, systems, and environments that impact the health of community members can be a confusing maze of physical attributes, organizational systems, and rules that govern behavior. This document will help Cooperative Extension agents and health advocates by teasing apart the complexity of community living to identify assets and barriers to community health. The document also explores the importance of engaging community members in the process of community health asset identification and improvement.

Departments: Community and Leadership Development
Series: Developing Organizational Leadership (CLD2 series)
Tags:
Size: 270 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-98

Field-grown Tomatoes

8/3/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is a warm-season crop that originated in South America. Tomatoes are one of the most popular and profitable crop alternatives in Kentucky. Growers able to provide the earliest locally grown tomatoes can often demand a premium price.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 861 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-GEN-16

Southern Blight

8/1/2018 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Emily Pfeufer, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Southern blight affects hundreds of different plants, including vegetables, field crops, ornamentals, and fruit. This disease is also known as southern stem blight, basal stem rot, Sclerotium blight, crown rot, and white mold (not to be confused with Sclerotinia white mold). Depending on host plant, production system, and environmental conditions, the severity of this disease can vary from a minor problem on isolated plants to extensive damage causing significant crop losses.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: mb
Pages: 5



PPFS-OR-W-20

Boxwood Blight

8/1/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Jamie Dockery, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Boxwood blight is a disease of boxwood (Buxus spp.), causing rapid defoliation and plant dieback. The fungal disease is particularly devastating to American boxwood cultivars, which can defoliate within a week and die within one growing season. Plants are eventually weakened by repeated defoliation and dieback, and resulting plant stress and consequent colonization by secondary invaders result in plant death.

Departments: Fayette County, Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.44 mb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-14

Pawpaw

7/31/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a unique tree fruit native to the eastern United States. Its highly aromatic fruit has a sweet, almost tropical-like flavor. The large fruit is oblong and typically produced singly or in clusters of two to nine. Pawpaw fruit pulp can be eaten fresh or prepared in a variety of desserts. Kentucky is fortunate to have the USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Asimina spp. located at Kentucky State University in Frankfort.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 778 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-3

Asian and European Pears

7/31/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Very few European pears (Pyrus communis) are grown commercially in Kentucky, primarily due to problems with fire blight and late spring frosts. Asian pears (P. pyrifolia, synonym P. serotina), on the other hand, are more consistently productive in Kentucky in spite of these problems. Also called apple pears, Asian pears are crisp and juicy like an apple, but with the sweetness associated with pears.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 1.70 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-133

Heirloom Beans

7/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Heirloom beans are vintage varieties of the warm-season crop (Phaseolus vulgaris) that have been handed down from generation to generation. There is a long tradition of saving bean seed in Appalachia, and heirloom beans are sought by customers at Kentucky farmers markets. Heirloom bean varieties, often named after particular areas or families, appeal to buyers because of both taste characteristics and cultural heritage.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-135

Figs

7/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Figs are harvested for both fresh consumption and processing. There are three main types of cultivated Ficus carica: Common, San Pedro and Smyrna. Common figs produce fruit parenthocarpically, without any pollination. Smyrna figs require pollen transfer from male trees that produce small caprifigs for fruit growth. Pollen transfer is obtained by the fig wasp (Blastophaga psenes L.), a species unable to survive the southern U.S. winter temperatures. San Pedro figs are intermediate between the two; a minor summer "breba" crop will set without fertilization but the later main crop requires pollination by the fig wasp. The common fig is the only type suggested for cultivation in the southern U.S.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 3



ID-250

An Introduction to Industrial Hemp and Hemp Agronomy

7/20/2018 (new)
Authors: Rich Mundell, David Williams

Cannabis sativa is a summer annual plant that is strongly photoperiod-sensitive (flowers according to day length/photoperiod; not physiological maturity). It is mostly dioecious in that male and female flowers occur on separate plants (i.e. there are both male plants and female plants). However, there are also several monoecious commercial varieties (male and female flower parts on the same plant). Different plant parts are harvested for specific purposes, and modern day hemp may be produced for one or more purposes. Depending on the harvestable component of interest, (i.e. fiber, grain or cannabinoids) male plants and/or pollen might be vitally necessary or completely unwanted.

Departments: KTRDC, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, other crops
Size: 3.17 mb
Pages: 6



CCD-CP-122

Sweet Corn

7/18/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Sweet corn (Zea mays subsp. mays) is one of the most popular fresh market vegetables produced in Kentucky. While field corn has thousands of years of history, sweet corn has only been available since the 1700s. Present day cultivars vary by kernel color (yellow, white and bicolor) and sugar content.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-123

Sweet Potato

7/16/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The terms "sweet potato" and "yam" are often used interchangeably; however, they are actually two entirely different crops. Only sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are grown in the U.S.; yams (Dioscorea spp.) are grown in the Caribbean and many other tropical areas. The most profitable marketing opportunities for sweet potatoes in Kentucky are through local fresh markets, such as farmers markets, direct delivery and CSA, and on-farm stands. Producers also market through local wholesale channels, selling directly from the farm to restaurants, grocers and institutional foodservice, including schools.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 810 kb
Pages: 3



PR-742

2018 Kentucky Small Grains Variety Performance Test

7/3/2018 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, John Connelly, Gene Olson, M.W. Piersawl, Sandy Swanson, Dave Van Sanford

The 2018 soft red winter wheat growing season ended with Kentucky farmers harvesting approximately 300,000 acres of the 440,000 acres planted, for a total production of 24 million bushels of grain. An average yield of 80 bushels per acre was estimated by NASS, but that figure may be reduced due to the shorter seed filling period associated with persistent high temperatures in May. The acreage not harvested for grain was primarily used for forage production and cover cropping.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, small grains, variety trials
Size: 560 kb
Pages: 24



AEC-101

Days Suitable for Fieldwork in Kentucky

7/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Tyler Mark, Jordan Shockley

Weather risk plays a unique role and influences many decisions made on the farm. Weather determines when you can get into the field and your ability to perform timely operations such as planting, fertilizing, spraying, and harvesting. Delays from weather events of time sensitive operations will result in substantial yield and economic losses. Therefore, having an expectation of the number of days suitable for fieldwork will allow producers to size farm machinery to mitigate such yield losses appropriately.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Agricultural Economics (AEC series)
Tags:
Size: 857 kb
Pages: 6



FCS5-468

International Travel: What You Need to Know Before You Go

7/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Jennifer Hunter

Individuals and families are planning leisure trips to destinations all over the world. Regardless of which international travel destination you choose, careful planning is a must. While planning an international trip may seem daunting, there are a few tips that you can follow to make sure that you have the best travel experience possible whether you are a novice or seasoned traveler.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Science
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 5



FCS5-469

Travel Arrangements

7/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Brooke Jenkins-Howard, Sally Mineer

Going on a vacation is supposed to be a relaxing, stress free experience. Unfortunately, you cannot relax until you have made all of the arrangements for your vacation. Where will you go? How will you get there? How will you spend your time? Giving adequate forethought to get ready for your trip will make for a more enjoyable vacation. One option for consumers is to seek professional help from a travel agent or other travel professional.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Science
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 984 kb
Pages: 3



FCS5-470

Money and International Travel

7/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Jennifer Hunter

Deciding to go on a vacation is an exciting, and all too often stressful experience. Your fantasies of reading a good book while on the beach may be interrupted by intrusive financial concerns. How should you pay for your trip? How will you protect your finances while you are gone? Should you get travel insurance? What about scams or theft? There are numerous financial issues to take into account when planning a trip. Consider implementing some of the following strategies in order to protect your finances.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Science
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 481 kb
Pages: 3



FCS5-471

Health and Travel

7/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Jennifer Hunter, Brooke Jenkins-Howard, Sally Mineer

Getting sick on vacation is bad news. It has the potential to ruin the trip for everyone. Finding quality medical care while on vacation can be difficult as well. While you may not always be able to prevent illness when travelling, you can be adequately prepared to minimize your symptoms and to get back to reclining comfortably on the beach as soon as possible. Consider the following suggestions to prepare for the possibility of health complications while traveling.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Family Science
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 299 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-CP-134

Minor Fruit Lacking Commercial Potential in Kentucky

6/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Over the years, growers and county extension agents have inquired about a number of different small fruits, questioning if these crops could be grown in Kentucky. A few of these crops have potential, while many others are either completely unsuitable for production here or they are unreliable from year to year. This profile discusses some of the pros and cons of producing this latter group of small fruit. The purpose is to communicate the reasons these unique fruits are not generally recommended for commercial production in the Commonwealth.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-4

Blackberries

6/18/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Blackberries (Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as 'brambles' or 'caneberries.' They have perennial crowns and roots. Most blackberry types produce canes the first season (primocanes) that do not bear fruit. The following year these are called floricanes, and bear fruit and then die naturally after harvest. Primocane-fruiting blackberries are an exception. They produce fruit on the primocanes in late summer and fall and again on these same canes (floricanes) the following July and early August before dying. With favorable growing conditions, brambles may produce for 12 or more years. Blackberries are grouped according to their growth habit: erect, semi-erect or trailing. Erect (thorny and thornless) and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries grow and yield well in most parts of the state. The trailing types are not recommended for commercial production in Kentucky due to their lack of winter hardiness. Primocane-fruiting thorny and thornless blackberries also do well in Kentucky; however, hot summers substantially reduce the primocane crop because a week of temperatures above 85 degrees F causes flowers to abort.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-57

Greenhouse Tomatoes

6/12/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Greenhouse tomato production has increased in recent years, responding to consumer demand for year-round fresh produce and advances in greenhouse vegetable production practices. However, of all the greenhouse crops, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are the most complicated to grow because they require the most management, the most labor, and the most light. A grower must be committed to meeting the daily demands of production to be successful. Prospective growers need to get as much information as they can about all aspects of greenhouse production before beginning this enterprise.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, greenhouse, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



ID-249

A Comprehensive Guide to Soybean Management in Kentucky

6/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Carl Bradley, J.D. Green, John Grove, Greg Halich, Erin Haramoto, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Travis Legleiter, Josh McGrath, Sam McNeill, Javier Reyes, Edwin Ritchey, Montse Salmeron, Jordan Shockley, Claire Venard, Raul Villanueva, Ole Wendroth, Kiersten Wise, Xi Zhang

This publication provides information on soybean growth and development, principles of variety selection, and management practices to maximize soybean profitability in Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, soybeans
Size: 38.99 mb
Pages: 84



CCD-CP-10

Jujube and Aronia

6/6/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Black aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) and jujube (Ziziphus jujube) are minor fruits that could have commercial potential in some areas of Kentucky. Growers looking for unique crops to add to their product mix may want to consider these novel fruits on a small scale.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 832 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-132

Heirloom Tomatoes

6/6/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are the most popular of heirloom vegetables, which are vintage varieties preserved by passing seed down from generation to generation. Heirloom tomato purchases grew in popularity as consumers sought flavorful, historic varieties. Many heirloom tomato varieties have unique coloration and appearance, but poor shipping characteristics, giving heirloom tomatoes an advantage for local sales.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-PFS-2

Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Introduction

6/6/2018 (new)
Authors: Bryan Brady, Badrinath Vengari Jagannathan, Paul Vijayakumar

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011 with the goal of preventing food safety problems. The FSMA Produce Safety Rule (PSR) is the first mandatory federal standard for fruit and vegetable production in the United States. Prior to FSMA, growers, packers, and the produce industry were encouraged to follow voluntary guidance such as the FDA's 1998 "Guide to Minimize Food Safety Hazard for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables." The FDA has very detailed guidelines for handling produce when it might touch water or a surface that is wet. Water in this situation would be called agricultural water. There are two kinds of agricultural water: water used to grow and care for the plants (production water) and water used to wash the produce during harvest and after it is state or territory of the United States, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Food Connection
Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-PFS series)
Tags:
Size: 920 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-PFS-3

Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables for Home Use

6/6/2018 (new)
Authors: Felix Akharume, Michael Montross, Paul Vijayakumar

Many farm-harvested or market-purchased fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed fresh or frozen, with little to none utilized as dry products; in general, dried fruits and vegetables are purchased directly from the market whenever needed. With the wide availability of tabletop kitchen equipment for fruit and vegetable processing (mechanical cutters, slicers, homemade dehydrators, blenders, etc.), consumers and small farmers with excess harvest or unsold fresh products can take the opportunity to process their fresh fruits and vegetables into dried snacks for direct use or sale at a farmer's market. The advantage of these dried products is their stable shelf life, versatility, and overall value addition. Dried products can be used at any time (6-12 months) with little or no loss in quality and can be used as intermediate goods in other products such as breakfast cereals. This publication presents easy-to-follow guidelines and conditions for processing selected fruits and vegetables into dried products.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-PFS series)
Tags: food and nutrition, food science, fruits, nursery and landscape, vegetables
Size: 693 kb
Pages: 8



CCD-CP-87

Bell Peppers

5/17/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Although bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) is a warm-season annual when grown in temperate regions, it is actually an herbaceous perennial when cultivated in tropical areas, such as its native Latin America. Bell peppers are considered "sweet" since they lack the pungent chemical (capsaicin) present in hot peppers.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-88

Broccoli

5/15/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea) is a cool-season crop that performs poorly in hot weather. As a member of the crucifer family, broccoli is closely related to other cole crops, such as cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 786 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-104

Microgreens

5/8/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Microgreens are young, tender, edible crops that are harvested as seedlings. These tiny plants are grown to the first true leaf stage. They should not be confused with sprouts, which are germinated seeds lacking true leaves. Microgreens are sold as a raw product for use in salads, on sandwiches, and as a garnish.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 819 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-102

Kohlrabi

5/7/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Miranda Combs, Matthew Ernst

Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes) is a cool-season annual cole crop that is related to broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. Kohlrabi originated in northern Europe in the 16th century. It forms a round globe just above the soil line with leaves emerging in a spiral from the stem. The edible portion is actually an enlarged stem, not root tissue. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw or cooked. In flavor, it is like a mild, sweet broccoli stem or turnip. Once the thick skin is peeled off, the crisp flesh can be eaten like a carrot often with a dip or in salads. It can be boiled, braised, used in soups and stews, made into home fries and even pies. In Kentucky, kohlrabi does well in the spring but is best as a fall crop.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-FS-2

What to Think About Before You Plant: Marketing Considerations for Kentucky Specialty Crop Growers

5/3/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

This publication poses questions that can benefit farmers who are considering planting a new crop. The publication is divided into the following six sections, with the majority of the content focused in the first two: 1) Market options by size and scale of production, 2) Conducting basic market research, 3) Certifications, 4) Insurance and risk management, 5) Management and labor needs, and 6) Resources needed beyond the field or garden.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags:
Size: 8.70 mb
Pages: 11



RB-335

Commercial Feeds in Kentucky, 2017

5/1/2018 (new)
Authors: Glen Harrison

Kentucky's commercial feed law provides protection for the state's livestock, poultry, and pet owners by regulating all feed materials offered for sale or for mixing into a feed. Products falling under regulation include all types of pet foods, livestock minerals, complete animal and poultry feeds, protein or mineral blocks, supplements, feed ingredients, specialty materials such as drug premixes, vitamin and mineral supplements, liquid feeds, pet supplements, pet treats, and other specialized pet foods. The law does provide for exemptions for whole and unprocessed grain, raw meat, hay, straw, stover, silage, cobs, husks, and hulls when not processed.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags: product testing, research
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 28



AGR-148

Weed Control in Alfalfa and Other Forage Legume Crops

4/23/2018 (major revision)
Authors: J.D. Green, Travis Legleiter

The importance of weed control in forage production should not be overlooked, especially when you consider the high investment associated with alfalfa and other legume forages. Weeds reduce forage yield by competing for water, sunlight, and nutrients. In addition to yield losses, weeds can also lower forage quality, increase the incidence of disease and insect problems, cause premature stand loss, and create harvesting problems. Some weeds are unpalatable to livestock or, in some cases, may be poisonous.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, weeds
Size: 528 kb
Pages: 12



CCD-CP-113

Potatoes

4/17/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a cool-season plant originally from the Andes Mountains of South America. The tubers are underground stems, not roots. Potatoes are most often grown in Kentucky as an early crop for fresh market consumption.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-101

Hot Peppers and Specialty Sweet Peppers

4/13/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Hot peppers, also known as chili (or chile) peppers, owe most of their "heat" or pungency to a chemical substance called capsaicin. This chemical is concentrated in the cross walls of the fruit and around the developing seeds. Chili peppers can be mild to fiery hot, depending on the amount of capsaicin present. The amount of capsaicin in peppers is measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU). Currently, the hottest pepper is considered to be the 'Carolina Reaper' which has 2.2 million SHUs. A combination of genetics and environment are responsible for the amount of heat in hot peppers. Peppers that do not contain capsaicin, such as bell peppers (0 SHUs), are considered "sweet." In addition to the hot types, other specialty peppers include sweet varieties of unusual shape, size and/or color.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 823 kb
Pages: 5



FCS3-610

Meal Kits: Are They Worth It?

4/10/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

There is high demand for convenience in our society. As a result, meal kit services have become increasingly popular. These meal kits are mailed directly to your front door each week. These kits include recipes and pre-measured ingredients ready to be used right away. Some of the most popular services include BlueApron, HelloFresh, and Plated. Since their beginning in 2012, meal kit services have grown into a $2.2-billion-dollar industry. There are over 100 companies in the US providing meal kit services.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 598 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-70

Field-grown Specialty Cut Flowers

4/9/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Cut flowers can be grown in open fields or in protected environments such as high tunnels or environmentally controlled greenhouses and sold fresh or dried. Non-flowering cut stems, such as seed heads, stalks and woody cuts, may also be grown for floral or decorative purposes. Cut flowers and cut stems are well-suited to small-scale production and are a good way to diversify or expand an existing farm operation. Specialty cut flowers can be sold by the stem, in bunches, or in mixed bouquets or value-added products.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: flowers, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants
Size: 729 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-T-8

Fungicide Guide for Burley and Dark Tobacco, 2018

4/1/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Will Barlow, Bob Pearce, Emily Pfeufer

The number of fungicides that are registered for use on tobacco in Kentucky is relatively small in comparison to the large array of products available to producers of other crops. Although growers have a limited number of fungicides from which to choose, those that are available are effective against most of the major diseases of roots, stems, and foliage.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 295.34 mb
Pages: 7



AGR-175

Forage Identification and Use Guide

3/28/2018 (reprinted)
Authors: David Ditsch, Jimmy Henning, Garry Lacefield, Ray Smith

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. They provide most of the feed for beef, dairy, horse, sheep, and wildlife. In addition, forage crops play a critical role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. The purpose of this publication is to provide both agronomic and identification information on several forage grasses and legumes.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 9.10 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-106

Okra

3/20/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) is a heat-loving vegetable in the Hibiscus family. It is particularly popular in the South, where the immature pods are used as an ingredient and thickening agent in soups, stews and gumbos. Okra can also be boiled, fried or pickled.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 762 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-236

Managing Frost Damaged Alfalfa Stands

3/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Dixon, Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Wide fluctuations in springtime temperature are common in Kentucky. Late freezing temperatures in the spring can cause damage to alfalfa depending on how far along it is in breaking dormancy. This publication provides information on the effect of low spring temperatures on both established and new alfalfa stands that have begun growth, as well as a method of predicting sensitivity to late frosts or freezes.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-91

Cauliflower

3/15/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) is a cool-season crop in the crucifer family. While it is closely related to broccoli and cabbage, cauliflower is more exacting in its environmental requirements than other cole crops. Cauliflower is very sensitive to unusually hot weather, temperatures that are too low, and drought. It is also subject to black rot and other diseases.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.10 mb
Pages: 2



CCD-SP-9

Starting a Nursery Business

3/14/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The nursery business involves the production and marketing of various plants including trees, shrubs, grasses, perennial and annual flowers, and fruit trees. A landscaping service, garden center, or sod farm may also be associated with a nursery enterprise. A successful nursery operator must be knowledgeable about all phases of plant production and be willing to work long, hard days. Good marketing and management skills are essential. A passion for ornamental plants and an entrepreneurial spirit add greatly to the chances for success.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: System Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-SP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape
Size: 860 kb
Pages: 5



RB-334

Seed Inspection Report, 2017

3/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

The Division of Regulatory Services is charged with administering the Kentucky Seed Law and Regulations, a "truth-in-labeling" law requiring basic labeling of seed components and quality factors to inform producers and consumers about the attributes of seed lots offered for sale in Kentucky. Our regulatory program protects the seed industry and consumers through inspection, sampling and analysis of seed products in Kentucky.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags:
Size: 3.20 mb
Pages: 37



CCD-CP-129

Pecans

3/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

The pecan and Eastern black walnut are Kentucky's most significant nut crops. Commercial pecan plantings are located near Paducah and Henderson, and native pecan groves have long been harvested near the Mississippi River. Only northern pecan cultivars are recommended for cultivation in Kentucky, as the state's usual growing season is not long enough for southern pecan varieties to mature. The established popularity of pecans with consumers could offer potential for producers willing to carefully establish pecan plantings on appropriate sites.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, nuts
Size: 647 kb
Pages: 4



RB-333

Annual Report Analyses of Official Fertilizer Samples July 2016 - June 2017

3/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Steve McMurry

This bulletin presents the results of the analysis of 2,623 official samples of commercial fertilizer taken during the period of July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017 by the field inspection staff. The samples represented approximately 55,241 tons of fertilizer out of the approximately 1,046,305 tons sold during this period. The Laboratory made 2,237 nitrogen, 1,797 phosphorus, 1,938 potassium, and 982 secondary and minor element and certain other analyses on these samples. Table 1 shows the manufacturers whose product the field inspection staff sampled, along with the number of samples taken and the percentage of those samples that passed. Table 2 shows the detailed N, P2O5, and K2O analyses of samples of mixed fertilizers and fertilizer materials. Table 3 contains the results of secondary and minor element and certain other analyses. Table 4 is a listing of companies or licensees registered or licensed to sell fertilizer in Kentucky as of June 30, 2017.

Departments: Regulatory Services
Series: Regulatory Bulletin (RB series)
Tags:
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 182



AGR-206

Lawn Management: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 15

3/5/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Gregg Munshaw, A.J. Powell

Turf is the foundation of a quality landscape. It improves the beauty of other ornamentals and provides a safe recreational surface. Quality lawns greatly increase the economic and sociological value of urban homes. They beautify and reduce the often harsh urban environment by decreasing noise, glare, heat, dust, and mud. Lawns and other recreational turf areas are an integral part of our daily activities.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: garden and landscape, turfgrass
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 22



AGR-229

Warm Season Annual Grasses in Kentucky

3/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

In Kentucky, cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limits growth during the summer months. Warm-season annual grasses can fill this gap with relatively high quality forage when properly managed. The purpose of this publication is to provide an overview of the various summer annuals for Kentucky.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 1.32 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-235

Baleage: Frequently Asked Questions

3/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Mike Collins, Dennis Hancock, Jimmy Henning, Brandon Sears, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Baled silage, or "baleage", is an excellent method for forage harvest, storage and feed efficiency. Baled silage allows forage to be harvested at higher whole plant moisture levels than required for dry hay. Baleage is ideal for spring cuttings of annual and perennial forages when seasonally frequent rainfall events provide little opportunity for properly curing dry hay. Many producers who want to harvest high quality small grain crops have found baleage to be a good fit for their operation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, other crops
Size: 145 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-237

Grass Options for Athletic Fields in the Transition Zone

3/2/2018 (new)
Authors: Nicole Mundell

There are several grasses that will grow in the transition zone, but none all that well. Our summers are often too hot for cool-season grasses like Kentucky bluegrass and our winters are often too cold for warm-season grasses like bermudagrass. Keep in mind, however, that the problem with most poor athletic fields is not grass selection, but rather over use, lack of maintenance, and/or use when field is wet or cannot recover.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, turfgrass
Size: 2.32 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-96

Ethnic Vegetables: Asian

3/2/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Asian vegetables are generally those vegetable crops originating from East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) and Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Laos, the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar). They may also include crops of South Asia (India and Pakistan). While often referred to as "oriental" vegetables, the term "Asian" is preferred. A number of these Asian crops have been successfully grown and marketed in Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 5



PPFS-AG-T-2

Managing Rhizoctonia Damping-off and Target Spot in the Float System

3/1/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Emily Pfeufer

Damping-off and target spot occur each year in tobacco transplant crops in Kentucky. These diseases can cause significant levels of damage to tobacco seedlings. Once considered minor problems in float beds, both have increased steadily in importance in recent years. Sound management practices and early recognition of these diseases are keys to preventing serious losses during the transplant production cycle.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 727 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-AG-T-3

Collar Rot in the Tobacco Float System

3/1/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Emily Pfeufer

Collar rot can be found in tobacco float beds each year in Kentucky, causing a great deal of concern when it makes its appearance. Severe losses to this disease tend to be rare but can occur if care is not taken to minimize risk of disease development and reduce spread after it appears.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 666 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-FS-8

Organic Regulations and Resources

2/28/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Two challenges for beginning organic crop production are meeting certified organic requirements and sourcing crop inputs that are approved for organic use. This fact sheet will summarize key considerations for meeting these challenges and list important sources of additional information for a producer interested in evaluating the feasibility of organic production on his or her farm.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 4



ASC-236

Molting Small-Scale Commercial Egg Flocks in Kentucky

2/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Molting is a common event in the annual life cycle of most avian species. Each year chickens lose feathers and grow new ones, and this occurs in both wild and domestic birds. During molt, laying hens go out of egg production and feathers are replaced. Molting, regardless of what stimulates it, is more than just the replacement of the plumage. Hormonal and physiological changes occur as well.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, poultry
Size: 280 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-MP-4

Roadside Farm Markets

2/23/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

A roadside farm market is sometimes distinguished from a roadside stand by location and hours. The term "roadside farm market" can refer to those markets located in permanent facilities at the farm or food manufacturing location; they are typically open most of the year. Roadside stand, by contrast, is a more general term referring to those markets that may be located off the farm and are seasonal in operation.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-230

Forage Sorghum

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage sorghum is the tallest of the summer annuals, reaching 6 to 15 feet in height and is best harvested as silage. Taller varieties produce high forage yield but can lodge, making them difficult to harvest mechanically. Some varieties have been developed that are shorter with increased resistance to lodging. Forage sorghums, like corn, are harvested once per season by direct chopping. While forage sorghum yields are similar to corn, they are lower in energy. The primary advantage of utilizing sorghum for silage production is its greater drought tolerance.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 567 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-231

Pearl Millet

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The primary benefits of pearl millet are that it does not contain prussic acid and is not susceptible to the sugarcane aphid. Dwarf varieties are available, which are leafier and better suited for grazing.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 1.18 mb
Pages: 2



AGR-232

Crabgrass

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Crabgrass possesses significant potential for supplying high quality summer forage although it is considered a weed by many. A primary advantage of crabgrass is that it is well adapted to Kentucky and occurs naturally in most summer pastures, especially those that have been overgrazed. It is also highly palatable and a prolific re-seeder. Planting an improved variety of crabgrass is recommended because the production of naturally-occurring ecotypes varies greatly. Crabgrass is best utilized by grazing.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 428 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-233

Foxtail Millet

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Foxtail millet (German millet) is a fine-stemmed summer annual used mainly for emergency hay or pasture for cattle. It is the lowest yielding of the summer annual grasses since it will not regrow after cutting. It can also be used as a smoother crop when transitioning to other perennial forage crops. Foxtail millet is also commonly used for wildlife plantings to produce food and cover for doves, quail, and other birds.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 960 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-234

Sudangrass and Sorghum-sudangrass Hybrids

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are developed by crossing sorghum with true sudangrass. The result is an annual grass that resembles sudangrass, but has coarser stems, taller growth habit, and higher yields. Like sudangrass, hybrids will regrow after grazing if growth is not limited by environmental factors. The coarse stems are difficult to cure as dry hay, therefore these grasses are best utilized for grazing, chopped silage and baleage.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 785 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-AG-F-10

Possible Causes of Yellowing Alfalfa

2/16/2018 (new)
Authors: Chris Teutsch, Paul Vincelli, Kiersten Wise

During spring, several leaf spotting diseases--including Leptosphaerulina (Lepto) leaf spot and spring black stem/leaf spot--are common in alfalfa. Leaf spotting diseases result in distinct round to elongated spots that sometimes have a dark margin. Very wet weather in spring and early summer favor activity of leaf spotting diseases in first and second cuttings. Wet and humid weather during summer favor other leaf spotting and blighting diseases. All leaf spots and blights weaken plants, but alfalfa often outgrows the damage in later cuttings. Maintain a regular cutting schedule, cutting at 30- to 35-day intervals.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Forage Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-F series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, plant diseases
Size: 754 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-604

Understanding Healthy Food Choices

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Have you ever heard that shopping the perimeter of a grocery store is healthier? Many healthy foods are on the outer walls of the store, yet several other healthy options are also tucked in the middle aisles. If you know what you are looking for and how to find them, several other items in the middle of the store should be on your grocery list.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.67 mb
Pages: 4



FCS3-605

Navigating the Grocery Store

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

age American makes over 200 food and beverage-related choices each day. This number seems high, but it makes sense when we think about the decisions we make. We decide what food and beverages we will eat. We are exposed to a multitude of items in our grocery stores. We are bombarded with television advertisements to choose specific food. And there are many fast food restaurant options available in our communities.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.07 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-606

Modifying Recipes

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Heather Norman-Burgdolf

To make recipe modification a common practice, we should frequently think about how increasing the nutrition of our recipes relates to our health. For example, lowering the amount of sodium in the diet over time through small recipe modifications may reduce risk of high blood pressure and heart disease.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 834 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-607

Dining Out in a Healthy Way

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Sodium is an important mineral to the body. It helps keep body fluids in balance, helps the body to absorb certain nutrients, and also aids in muscle performance and sending nerve messages. Excessive sodium in the diet is linked with high blood pressure or hypertension. Hypertension can result in diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, or stroke.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 2.68 mb
Pages: 5



FCS3-608

Fitting Nutrition into Your Busy Lifestyle

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

Your overall nutrition picture depends on selections of food and serving sizes over a period of time. To make wise food choices you need to know a little about food and healthful cooking techniques. A balanced diet contains a wide variety of foods. The key to making good food choices is to plan.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 871 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-609

Shaking Down on Salt

2/9/2018 (new)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Heather Norman-Burgdolf

The demand for convenience and a change in eating habits have contributed to the popularity of dining out. Busy schedules often force people to eat on the run. Take out, frozen foods, and home-delivered meals are habits characteristic of many Americans. Meals eaten away from home can potentially contribute excess calories, fat, and sodium while limiting the intake of calcium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A and C. Excess snacking from calorie-laden, low nutrient-dense foods can lead to consuming too much fat and sugar. The two trends of dining out more and an increased interest in health, fitness, and nutrition seem to be incompatible, but with careful planning, healthful eating can be achieved regardless of our busy lives.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 351 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-583

Home Canning Vegetables

2/2/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Annhall Norris

Home canning vegetables from your garden or local farmers market can help you save money and gain control over what's in your food while preserving the bounty of summer for your family's year-round enjoyment. To ensure safe, high quality home-canned products, always follow research-based recommendations when canning.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 444 kb
Pages: 13



FCS3-584

Home Canning Fruit

2/2/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Annhall Norris

Home canning fruit from your garden, orchard, or local farmers market can help save you money and gain control over what's in your food, while preserving the taste of summer for your family's year-round enjoyment. To ensure safe, high quality home-canned products, always follow research-based recommendations when canning.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 542 kb
Pages: 12



FCS3-585

Home Canning Meat, Poultry and Seafood

2/2/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Sandra Bastin, Annhall Norris

Home canning your own meat, poultry, wild game or fish can help you save money, gain control over what's in your food, and save time in meal preparation. To ensure safe, high quality home-canned products, always follow research-based recommendations when canning.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 412 kb
Pages: 9



CCD-MP-20

Marketing Fresh Produce to Food Retailers (Grocery Stores)

2/1/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

The food retail industry saw a renaissance of interest in local and regional sourcing of fresh fruits and vegetables during the 2000s. This interest came within an industry characterized by heavy investment in fewer and larger centralized distribution centers. Although the distribution center model remains prominent within the food retail industry, some retailers have created flexibility within their distribution models to answer consumer demand for local produce. Large retailers are also finding transportation and distribution cost savings by sourcing fresh produce items from new or expanding producers. Smaller chains and local grocers remain potential markets for fresh produce growers expanding to wholesale volumes. Producers of value-added produce products may also find local groceries a possible market for their product.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 3.00 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-AG-C-7

Physoderma Brown Spot

2/1/2018 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Brenda Kennedy, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Physoderma brown spot can be a striking foliar disease that is periodically observed in field corn in Kentucky. This publication describes the symptoms and cause of disease, conditions that favor disease development, and options for disease management.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 743 kb
Pages: 2



ENT-68

Insects: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 8

1/29/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Lee Townsend

Insects, spiders, mites, etc. are among the oldest and most numerous animals on Earth. Some species, like the house fly, occur in every county of the state, while others live in very specific areas, such as a western Kentucky wetland or an eastern Kentucky mountain meadow. Like it or not, insects have a major impact on our lives, health, and environment. Learning more about them can increase your enjoyment of nature and help you to manage problem species more effectively.

Departments: Entomology
Series: Entomology (ENT series)
Tags: insects
Size: 1.38 mb
Pages: 12



ASC-230

Factors to Consider Before Starting a Small-scale Egg Production Enterprise in Kentucky

1/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

There are several things to consider before starting an egg production operation. The most important is market availability. Before you start production you need to have a market that your production can supply, in terms of both quantity of product and the price you need to get in order to be profitable. You will need to make sure that local regulations allow for poultry production on the land available to you. Cash flow is also an important consideration. A flock will require a considerable investment before the hens start to lay eggs to produce an income. You also need to have a way to deal with the manure produced, and any dead birds. You also need to have a plan for the hens after they have finished laying (referred to as spent hens).

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: business and records, livestock, poultry
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-232

Raising Replacement Pullets for Small-Scale Egg Production

1/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Poultry producers who raise their own replacement pullets have better control over the growth, condition, and development of the flock. The quality of the pullet flock will have a direct effect on the subsequent level of egg production. The two most important quality factors for a replacement flock are proper body weight and uniformity. Pullet weight at 6 weeks of age has been shown to influence subsequent egg production. Once the pullets start to lay, it is too late to solve problems from poor nutrition or management during the pullet rearing period.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags:
Size: 2.48 mb
Pages: 9



ASC-233

Feeds and Feeding for Small-Scale Egg Production Enterprises

1/25/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Animals eat in order to get the energy and nutrients they need to live, grow and reproduce. Animals use energy to perform normal body functions such as breathing, walking, eating, digesting, and maintaining body temperature. Different types of nutrients provide energy as well as the building blocks needed for the development of bone, flesh, feathers, and eggs. These nutrients include: water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals, and vitamins. Each of these components is important and a deficit of even one can have serious health consequences for poultry.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, nutrition and health, poultry
Size: 2.54 mb
Pages: 12



CCD-MP-21

Marketing Fresh Produce to Restaurants

1/25/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Tim Woods

Sourcing and serving fresh produce from local farms remains a trend in the U.S. foodservice industry. The practice of sourcing locally grown fresh produce, first featured by niche and high-end restaurants, moved into mainstream foodservice distribution channels in the early 2000s. A focus on local food appears to be persisting into the 2020s. The National Restaurant Association's 2018 Culinary Forecast, based on surveys of nearly 700 chefs, identified hyper-local sourcing as the top restaurant concept trend, with local produce also among the Top 10 concept trends.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 5



HO-120

Off the Grid: Ultra-Low Pressure Drip Irrigation and Rainwater Catchment for Small Plots and High Tunnels

1/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Krista Jacobsen, Brent Rowell

All forms of irrigation need a push or pressure to move water from its source to its destination. Water sources include wells, springs, lakes, creeks, canals, rivers, cisterns, elevated tanks, or municipal water supplies. The amount of pressure or push required depends on many things including the height water must be lifted, length and size of the delivery pipe(s), crop and size of the area to be irrigated, and the distance water needs to be moved from the source to the field, greenhouse, or tunnel.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: equipment and structures, high tunnel, production practices
Size: 9.42 mb
Pages: 12



ID-248

Gardening in Small Spaces

1/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Ashley Osborne

Although most would agree that gardening is a worthwhile endeavor, traditional gardening with long neat rows spaced 3 or 4 feet apart to allow cultivation by a tractor or tiller may not be feasible for everyone. Individuals that live in urban areas, especially those living in townhomes, condominiums, and apartments may not have the outdoor space needed for this conventional style of gardening. In addition, those with limited mobility may not be able to establish and maintain this type of garden. For many, raised bed gardening and container gardening may be a more practical and manageable choice for those gardening in small spaces and those with limited mobility.

Departments: Ag Programs, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 1.14 mb
Pages: 8



ENT-70

Pesticides and Pesticide Safety: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 10

1/23/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Lee Townsend

"Pest" is not a biological term for an organism's environmental role as are the words plant, herbivore, predator, and scavenger. It is a term for an organism that is either causing damage or is somewhere where it's not wanted. Pests can include plants, insects and their relatives, and microorganisms that cause plant diseases. Often, pests are a problem because we use cultural practices or create conditions favoring organisms that they feed on, compete with, or infect the desirable species.

Departments: Entomology
Series: Entomology (ENT series)
Tags: garden and landscape, insect pests
Size: 310 kb
Pages: 10



FOR-121

Vertebrate Pest Management: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 19

1/23/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Tom Barnes, Matthew Springer

Most people enjoy watching wildlife around the home, whether it is birds at a feeder, butterflies on flowers, or the occasional deer or turkey wandering through the yard. In some instances, wildlife come into contact with humans and are in the wrong place at the wrong time. For the gardening enthusiast, this encounter can create conflict.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 750 kb
Pages: 10



AGR-205

Weed Management: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 20

1/22/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: J.D. Green

Every garden has weeds, and every gardener wonders what to do about them. Gardening involves lots of small decisions that can have a cumulative effect on those weed problems. This chapter will explore the origin of weeds, their adaptation and impact, and the techniques you can use to manage weeds in your landscape.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: garden and landscape, weeds
Size: 965 kb
Pages: 14



ASC-234

Use of Biosecurity and Natural Remedies for the Prvention of Poultry Disease in "Natural" and "Organic" Flocks

1/22/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

It is easier to prevent disease than it is to treat an outbreak. A biosecurity plan is essential to an effective health management plan. "Bio" refers to life and "Security" is protection. A biosecurity program for a poultry farm is a series of common-sense activities designed to keep disease (bacterial, viral, parasitic) out of the poultry flock.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags:
Size: 157 kb
Pages: 6



ASC-235

My Mare's in Heat: Predicting and Recognizing Signs of Estrus

1/22/2018 (new)
Authors: Amy Lawyer

You have heard the term frequently that a mare is in heat, but what does it mean exactly? Heat is the layman's term for showing signs of estrus. Whether you are planning to breed your mare or not her body will continue to prepare to be pregnant.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: horses, reproduction and genetics
Size: 85 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-CP-131

Eggplant

1/22/2018 (reviewed)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is a heat-loving member of the Solanaceous family. While it is generally grown as an annual in North America, eggplant is actually an herbaceous perennial. Long a popular vegetable in Asian, Middle Eastern, Greek and Italian cuisine, the eggplant is thought to have been introduced to America by Thomas Jefferson.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 3



ASC-229

Marketing Regulations Affecting Small-scale Egg Producers in Kentucky

1/12/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

It is important that you comply with all the laws and regulations with regards to the marketing of eggs. Eggs are capable of carrying bacteria such as Salmonella enteritidis. As a result, eggs are considered a hazardous food and their sale is regulated. With regard to small-scale producers, if you sell more than 60 dozen eggs in any one week, you will require an egg handler's license. You will also need an egg handler's license if you sell to someone who sells eggs to someone else. This would include grocery stores, restaurants, or wholesalers. The same will hold true if you sell to a bakery, confectionary or ice-cream manufacturer.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: business and records, livestock, poultry
Size: 267 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-231

Breed Selection for a Small-scale Egg Production Enterprise

1/12/2018 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Once you have decided you are going to go into egg production, you need to determine what breed of chicken will best suit your needs. A variety of different commercial breeds are available for use in small-scale commercial egg production operations. Most lay a brown-shelled egg, which is typically preferred by the people purchasing eggs produced in alterative production systems. Most of these commercial chickens are hybrids selected specifically for these systems.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, poultry
Size: 1.28 mb
Pages: 5



FCS3-596

Body Balance: The Connection between Pollution and Nutrition

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

Pollution increases compounds called free radicals in the body. Too many free radicals in the body cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can increase the risk for cancer and other chronic diseases because cells are damaged more easily and do not repair themselves as well. Pollution in the environment cannot always be avoided. However, eating for good health may help reduce the effects of pollution in the body. Choosing more nutritious foods, such as those high in phytonutrients, may reduce oxidative stress and protect the body from the negative health effects of pollution.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 214 kb
Pages: 2



FCS3-597

Body Balance: Cut Down on Environmental Pollutants in Your Food

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

Environmental pollutants in food are concerning. Foods like fish may be contaminated with mercury and Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Fruits and rice may contain arsenic. High-fat meat and dairy products may also contain chemicals from pollution that aren't healthy for your body. Read on to learn how to choose foods with less pollutants, which can help keep the body healthier and lessen the risk of chronic diseases.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.82 mb
Pages: 5



FCS3-598

Body Balance: Make Your Plate a Rainbow

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

A phytonutrient comes from plant-based foods. Think of a phytonutrient like a vitamin or mineral in that it can benefit health. Research shows they are good, but scientists have not determined them to be essential like vitamins or minerals, or determined how much needs to be consumed each day. In the future, there may be recommended levels of phytonutrients to consume, just like vitamins and minerals today. There are thousands of phytonutrients. They naturally occur in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and other plant foods. Like vitamins and minerals, there are diverse types of phytonutrients, and they have various positive health effects. Certain foods are higher in some types of phytonutrients than others, just like how vitamin C is high in oranges, and milk is high in calcium. Therefore, consuming a variety of plant foods means you will eat a variety of phytonutrients!

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.18 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-599

Body Balance: Healthy Ways to Flavor Your Food

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

Using herbs and spices is a healthy way to add flavor to food and they may protect against the harmful effects of environmental pollution. We are exposed to pollution every day in our air, water, soil, and even our food. This exposure to pollution may have negative effects on health. Herbs and spices help protect the body by decreasing cell damage caused by the pollution that we are exposed to everyday. Reducing cell damage helps protect against the development or progression of various chronic diseases. Some herbs and spices are also anti-bacterial and anti-microbial, which helps keep the immune system strong to protect against diseases and pollution. Even though research shows that herbs and spices are beneficial to health, scientists have not determined exactly how much of each herb and spice should be consumed each day. In the future, there may be official recommendations, like for vitamins. Incorporating a variety of herbs and spices into meals is flavorful and may have health benefits.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.12 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-600

Body Balance: Fundamentals of Fermented Foods

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

Fermented foods are foods that have been aged in a way that allows good bacteria to develop in them. Consuming these good bacteria can benefit health. Common fermented foods are yogurt, soy sauce, sauerkraut, and some types of pickles. Although these foods may seem like an odd assortment, they are all fermented and contain good bacteria.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 847 kb
Pages: 4



FCS3-601

Body Balance: Picking out Produce: All About Organic and Conventional Food

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

When shopping at the grocery store, there are many choices to make about which foods to purchase. Currently, one of the most popular food trends is eating organic produce. Organic produce is marked with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Organic label and is usually separated from the rest. There are some differences between how organic foods and regular or conventionally foods are grown. Pesticides are found in almost all foods.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 1.24 mb
Pages: 3



FCS3-602

Body Balance: Safe Storage for Food and Drink

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Lisa Gaetke

How food and drink is stored plays a big part in how long it stays fresh. Some types of packaging can keep food fresher longer. There are many types of packaging and beverage containers, and some are safer than others, which may have negative health effects. People are exposed to pollution every day, in ways that cannot always be avoided. Even storage containers may contain potentially harmful chemicals. For example, heating plastic that is not microwave safe can cause chemical residue to come in contact with food. Certain plastics may have negative effects on health. Read on to find out more about the safest ways to store food and drinks.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 883 kb
Pages: 3



FCS3-603

Body Balance: Nutritious Nuts and Seeds

12/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Hannah Bellamy, Dawn Brewer, Megan Finnie, Lisa Gaetke, Carolyn Hofe, Beth Willett

Eating plant foods, such as nuts and seeds, makes a diet more nutritious and may help reduce the risk of chronic diseases. It is especially helpful if you encounter pollutants in the environment. Plant foods, including nuts and seeds contain nutritious compounds called phytonutrients. Unlike vitamins and minerals, there is no Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for phytonutrients.

Departments: Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Food and Nutrition (FCS3 series)
Tags:
Size: 4.58 mb
Pages: 4



PR-737

2017 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The major factor in selecting a variety of summer annual grass is yield, both total and seasonal. Growth after first cutting is strongly dependent on available moisture and nitrogen fertilization. Summer annual grasses generally have different characteristics and uses. The major factors in selecting cool season cereal grass varieties are yield, winter survival and regrowth.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 2.13 mb
Pages: 20



PR-738

2017 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 2.85 mb
Pages: 24



PR-735

2017 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/18/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 12



CCD-MP-11

MarketReady Producer Training Program

12/15/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Miranda Hileman

The MarketReady Producer Training Program instructs producers in the key business functions that small farmers and ranchers must manage as they seek to develop supplier relationships with restaurants, grocers, wholesalers, and foodservice buyers, including schools. While significant opportunity exists to build on the demand for local products in local markets, many farmers are hesitant or unprepared to meet the transactional requirements expected by these buyers to manage their own food safety, insurance, product quality, and traceability risks. MarketReady addresses these issues. After training, producers will be prepared for business transactions when selling a variety of products including dairy, fruits, meats and vegetables.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Marketing Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-MP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 3



LA-10

Walkability and Connectivity: Planning for Enhancing Walkability and Connectivity

12/13/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

Built environment patterns are essential for supporting the pedestrian experience in communities for health, wellness and safety. Since the mid-20th century, the intertwined relationship between sprawling development patterns and auto dependence has left many communities with built environments that discourage people from walking in the community. With shifting focus on people rather than cars, attention and interest in planning and design has brought about the need to bring back walkable communities for various goals and objectives including pursuing healthy lifestyles, engaging in more physical activities and investing in attractive pedestrian focused environments. Many communities have turned their efforts toward reintroducing and strengthening their pedestrian paths/networks and increasing connectivity in the community. Supportive built environment patterns can have other impacts on people's everyday lives and lifestyles such as providing for a safe and attractive environment for outdoor activities. Furthermore, sound and well-connected walkable environments can also directly influence a community's economic health, place identity, and sense of community.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 4.23 mb
Pages: 8



LA-11

Placemaking: Strengthening Your Public Spaces

12/13/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

Strong public spaces provide lasting impressions and shared community experiences. Public spaces refers to locations that are accessible to the public. This can include parks, streets, playgrounds or fair grounds. In addition to publicly owned spaces, public spaces can also include privately owned spaces with areas open to the public such as plazas or memorials. Although the size and scope of public spaces may differ, the goals and functions should be suitable and appropriate for the size and location, whether small or large, rural or urban. Successful public spaces connect with other parts of a community and are accessible and open to the public, residents and visitors alike.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 1.25 mb
Pages: 3



LA-12

Placemaking: Planning and Designing Meaningful Public Spaces

12/13/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

Public spaces are areas that are open to the public to access and use. Spaces that are used most frequently tend to be valued highly in the community. When these public spaces have personal meanings associated with them that transform them into memorable public places. Therefore, public places are not only locations in our society, but tend to have an additional special identity linked to the public spaces. Great public places in communities should strive to be destinations for both locals and visitors.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 3.39 mb
Pages: 6



PR-736

2017 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

12/13/2017 (new)
Authors: Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 725 kb
Pages: 8



PR-733

2017 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 413 kb
Pages: 4



PR-734

2017 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 4



PR-740

2017 Kentucky Soybean Performance Tests

12/7/2017 (new)
Authors: Brandon Roberts, Claire Venard

The Kentucky Soybean Variety Performance Tests are conducted to provide an unbiased and objective estimate of the relative performance of soybean varieties commercially available in Kentucky. This information may be used by growers and seed producers to aid in selecting varieties that will give the highest total production in a specific situation. Soybean cultivars in the 2017 tests were entered by soybean growers, commercial companies, state and federal institutions. Forty soybean tests were planted in 2017 in Kentucky, at the eight test locations.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, soybeans, variety trials
Size: 3.48 mb
Pages: 31



PR-732

2017 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

12/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on annual and perennial ryegrass varieties in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting varieties. Tables 14, 15, and 16 show summaries of all annual and perennial ryegrass and festulolium varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 17 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety test-ing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.35 mb
Pages: 16



CLD2-13

Aligning Leadership Programs with Community Development

12/5/2017 (new)
Authors: Daniel Kahl

Aligning the content and activities of a leadership program with the intended outcomes for the participants, stakeholders, and broader community is important for several reasons. This publication will help community leaders who oversee a community-based leadership development program to align their leadership development with community development. For community leaders thinking of starting a leadership program, this publication will be a valuable resource for providing focus and identifying desired program content.

Departments: Community and Leadership Development
Series: Developing Organizational Leadership (CLD2 series)
Tags:
Size: 195 kb
Pages: 4



PR-739

2017 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/5/2017 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Ty Cato, Steve Diver, Bob Geneve, June Johnston, Dave Lowry, Emily Pfeufer, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Joseph Tucker, Dwight Wolfe

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collec-tion of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry. The 2017 Fruit and Vegetable Crops re-search report includes results for 16 projects.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, vegetables
Size: 7.21 mb
Pages: 46



PPFS-FR-S-3

Blackberry Rosette (Double Blossom)

12/1/2017 (major revision)
Authors: Michele Stanton, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Rosette disease, caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi, is a serious and destructive disease of blackberries in most parts of Kentucky. In some locations, growers have been forced out of growing blackberries because of rosette disease.

Departments: Horticulture, Kenton County, Plant Pathology
Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
Tags:
Size: 637 kb
Pages: 3



PR-729

2017 Orchardgrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties. Table 11 shows a summary of all orchardgrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and from a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 833 kb
Pages: 8



PR-730

2017 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on tall fescue varieties and similar grass species in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting tall fescue varieties. Tables 15 and 16 show a summary of all tall fescue and bromegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 17 years. The UK Forage Extension Web site at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 12



PR-731

2017 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides maturity and yield data on timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky. Tables 10 and 11 show summaries of all timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 542 kb
Pages: 6



FCS5-466

Don't Become a Victim of Educational Fraud and Student Debt

11/29/2017 (new)
Authors: Bob Flashman

Education is a stepping stone to greater opportunity in life. The more education and career training you have, the more you are likely to earn in your career. But education beyond high school is becoming increasingly expensive for students and families, and those who need it must find ways to pay. Each year, many students take out student loans in order to continue their education and prepare for good careers. They may, however, end up with overwhelming debt. This brings great financial strain, possibly for decades to come.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 458 kb
Pages: 4



FCS5-467

Selecting a Major and Career for a Sound Financial Future

11/29/2017 (new)
Authors: Bob Flashman

Many students enter college not knowing what they want to study or what their career interests are. It is common for college freshmen and sophomores to have undeclared majors. Many students change their majors throughout their college career, and for a variety of reasons. It is not surprising that they might decide on a different career than they had in mind originally. Selecting your major is something to be passionate about. You also have to have the aptitude. When making your final decision, consider the economic value of your major. How much can you earn? Will you be able to live where you want? Will your education and internship opportunities lead where you want?

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 528 kb
Pages: 5



PR-727

2017 Alfalfa Report

11/29/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.53 mb
Pages: 12



PR-726

Kentucky Corn Silage Hybrid Performance Report, 2017

11/28/2017 (new)
Authors: Ricky Arnett, Matthew Campbell, Chad Lee, Linda McClanahan, Nick Roy, Will Stallard

The objective of the Silage Corn Hybrid Performance Test is to provide unbiased forage yield and quality data for corn hybrids commonly grown for silage in Kentucky.

Departments: Adair County, Green County, Lincoln County, Mason County, Mercer County, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 341 kb
Pages: 4



PR-728

2017 Red and White Clover Report

11/27/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 757 kb
Pages: 6



CCD-BG-10

2017 Vegetable and Melon Budgets (Large-scale)

11/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

These commercial vegetable and melon budgets compare and analyze profitability between crops using assumptions developed during the 2017 season. These budgets should not be considered as production recommendations or profitability projections. Production practices vary widely between farms and regions. Producers may request details for each budget from the Center for Crop Diversification. Budget details will allow greater comparison of budget assumptions with a user's actual field situation. All values may be changed within each budget worksheet.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture
Series: Budgets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-BG series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 1



CCD-BG-11

2017 Vegetable and Melon Budgets (Small-scale)

11/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

These commercial vegetable and melon budgets compare and analyze profitability between crops using assumptions developed during the 2017 season. These budgets should not be considered as production recommendations or profitability projections. Production practices vary widely between farms and regions. Producers may request details for each budget from the Center for Crop Diversification. Budget details will allow greater comparison of budget assumptions with a user's actual field situation. All values may be changed within each budget worksheet. Most of the worksheets assume all production is sold at the same price, but there is also a blank line for a second quantity/cost for users to add if desired, such as already done in sweet potatoes.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Budgets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-BG series)
Tags:
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages:



LA-8

Streetscapes: Planning and Designing Vibrant Streets

11/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

Streetscapes can provide and support community visions for social interaction and achieve common goals such as safety, economic health, or social destinations. Streetscapes also contribute to lasting impressions of communities and places. The streetscape development process requires community members to work together with local governments and other state and federal agencies that are responsible for creating and managing public right-of-ways, the property located edge to edge on either side of a street. The planning process provides opportunities for collaboration among organizations, meaningful interaction and strengthens community capacity.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 3.59 mb
Pages: 6



LA-9

Walkability and Connectivity: Enhancing the Pedestrian Travel Environment for Healthier Communities

11/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

Our built environment patterns can be more supportive of pedestrian experiences rather than that of vehicle travel. Since the mid-20th century, housing developments have sprawled beyond city limits with convenient and connected infrastructure such as road networks. However, such built environment patterns have influenced personal lifestyles. Partly, this results from the lack of appropriate environmental settings for safe and engaging outdoor activities within close distances to and connections to where we live and work. Attention and interest in planning and design of our built environment has brought about the need to return to walkable communities for a variety of goals and objectives, including investing in attractive pedestrian focused environments, engaging in more physical activities and pursuing healthy lifestyles. In addition to the physical health of communities, walkability characteristics of communities also have indirect influences on a community's economic performance, sense of community and place identity.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 3



HO-119

Reducing Heat Stress to Container-Grown Plants

11/14/2017 (new)
Authors: Dewayne Ingram

Production of plants in containers offer many advantages over field production. Shorter production cycles, larger numbers of plants per acre, and the ability to continuously market and ship plants are among those advantages. However, there are some disadvantages including more intense cultural practices, a relatively short window of optimum marketability due to container size restrictions, and rapid daily temperature fluctuations within the container substrate (growing medium). This publication will provide information about plant response to high root-zone temperatures, identify critical temperatures, describe the factors that influence temperature fluctuations, and suggest cultural practices to reduce heat stress in container-grown plants.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants
Size: 1.24 mb
Pages: 6



IP-73

Living Along a Kentucky Stream

11/8/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Tom Barnes, Amanda A. Gumbert, Lee Townsend

Guidelines for maintaining a healthy stream and understanding stream stewardship.

Departments: Ag Programs, Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Interprogram (IP series)
Tags:
Size: 6.83 mb
Pages: 12



AEN-135

Rainwater Harvesting for Livestock Production Systems

11/7/2017 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

Abundant, clean drinking water is an essential nutrient for livestock. The obvious water source that is recommended by veterinarians is city water. However, city water has its drawbacks. City water distribution systems are often expensive to install and have a recurring usage charge. In some instances, city water is unavailable, may have inadequate pressure, or producers consider it too expensive to operate, forcing them to use streams and ponds to water livestock. Collecting rainwater from a catchment area, is a low cost, high quality alternative water source that can supplement traditional water distribution systems and improve the environmental quality of farming operations. Rainwater harvesting involves the collection of rainfall from rooftops or land based catchments systems for storage and distribution as needed. Capturing rainfall has the added benefit of improving water quality by reducing soil erosion and runoff. Strategically installed rainwater harvesting systems can be used to direct stormwater around sensitive areas of the farm where animal waste is present, thus reducing the potential for nutrient and pathogen delivery to nearby waterways. Rainwater harvesting and stormwater management techniques can also reduce the volume of water that must be managed in liquid manure management systems by diverting clean water away from manure pits and lagoons.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags:
Size: 807 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-PFS-1

Produce Food Safety: Packing and Storing

11/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Paul Vijayakumar

: If you intend to sell your produce, you'll need to package it. Some growers immediately assume that they'll need a large, complicated packing shed with state-of-the art technology. Typically this is not the case, and for some situations you might not need a packing facility at all. Before we go into some of the best practices for managing a packing shed, you should first consider whether you need one at all. Many of the practices discussed in this publication will depend on the requirements of your buyer. The first step before making upgrades to your food safety infrastructure is to talk to your buyer--ask them how they expect products packaged, box sizes, and whether they expect the product to be washed. Do they currently expect a third-party Good Agriculture Practice (GAP) audit? Do they anticipate requiring one in the near future? As long as you are meeting all regulatory requirements and taking common sense steps to keep your produce safe, there is no need to exceed the expectations of your buyer. In the case of Farmers Markets and CSAs, the expectations for washing can be highly variable.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-PFS series)
Tags:
Size: 3.00 mb
Pages: 7



PR-725

2017 Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test

11/2/2017 (new)
Authors: Cam Kenimer, Chad Lee, Brandon Roberts

The objective of the Kentucky Hybrid Corn Performance Test is to provide relative performance estimates of hybrid seed corn sold in Kentucky. The test attempts to treat every hybrid similarly in an unbiased manner. Agronomic practices that meet or exceed university guidelines are implemented at each location.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, research, variety trials
Size: 2.92 mb
Pages: 24



CCD-CP-118

Snap Beans

10/24/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The snap bean or green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is a warm-season crop harvested for its immature seed pods. Prior to the development of the stringless bean in the 1890s, snap beans were referred to as "string beans" because of the fiber or "string" running along the pod seam. While stringless beans are more common today, many consumers still prefer the flavor of the stringed types.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 668 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-FS-7

Risk Management in Specialty Crops: Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP)

10/24/2017 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) is a financial assistance program provided through the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA). The program provides producers of crops not eligible for crop insurance with some level of risk management when natural disasters cause crop low yields, crop losses or prevent crop planting.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags:
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 2



LA-7

Streetscapes: Visioning Vibrant Relationships

10/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Jayoung Koo

A streetscape is the sphere that includes the public right-of-way from the edge of properties on both sides of the street. The streetscape typically includes a mix of features including but not limited to the following: vehicular lanes, sidewalks, bike lanes, parking spaces, planting strips, storm water management elements, signage, street lights, utility lines, amenities such as bus stops, and facades of built structures. The nature of a successful streetscape design is to convey a safe, environmentally friendly, aesthetically appealing, inclusive, and context sensitive atmosphere to the area, neighborhood, or district. Additionally, established streetscapes enhance the functionality, accessibility, and vitality of the built environment.

Departments: Landscape Architecture
Series: Landscape Architecture (LA series)
Tags:
Size: 720 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-115

Appropriate All-Weather Surfaces for Livestock

10/16/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Stephanie Mehlhope, Lee Moser, Sarah Wightman

Many livestock producers would say that mud is a natural part of livestock production. But the creation of mud costs producers money and makes them less competitive. Livestock that walk through mud require more feed for energy but actually eat less because walking in mud requires more effort to get to feed and water. Therefore, mud decreases average daily gains. Mud accumulation on the coat increases the amount of energy needed to generate heat in the winter or to keep cool in the summer. Also, it can lower sale prices due to hanging tags. The creation of mud also increases animal stress and leads to a variety of health problems, including protozoan and bacterial infections. It is essential that livestock producers understand that mud hinders cost-efficient livestock production and efforts should be made to limit the creation of mud. This publication explains how mud is created and describes different types of hardened surfaces and pads that agricultural producers should use to reduce mud creation and ultimately increase production efficiency and protect natural resources.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 2.73 mb
Pages: 8



ID-149

2017 Kentucky Blackberry Cost and Return Estimates

10/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, John Strang, Tim Woods, Shawn Wright

Potential producers should realize that while thornless semi-erect varieties produce superior economic returns, thorny and thornless erect varieties may hold some marketing advantages that can command superior prices and result in better returns than those estimated using these standard assumptions.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: business and records, farm crops, fruits and nuts, production practices
Size: 265 kb
Pages: 20



PPFS-AG-C-5

Diplodia Ear Rot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Diplodia ear rot can reduce yield and grain quality by damaging kernels, lowering grain test weight, and reducing grain fill. Incidence of affected ears in the field can vary from 1% or 2% to as high as 80%. Although mycotoxins have been associated with Diplodia ear rot in South America and South Africa, there have been no reports of livestock feeding issues due to mycotoxins linked to Diplodia ear rot in the United States.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 990 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-C-6

Holcus Leaf Spot

10/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kelsey Mehl, Kiersten Wise

Holcus leaf spot, a bacterial disease, can be seen sporadically in Kentucky cornfields, and it is challenging to diagnose. This publication describes the disease symptoms, conditions that favor disease, and how to distinguish holcus spot from herbicide injury that can mimic this disease.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Corn Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-C series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, production practices
Size: 889 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-116

Romaine Lettuce

10/10/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Romaine (Lactuca sativa), also known as cos, is a lettuce that produces elongated heads. Romaine is considered more nutritious and has more volume than iceberg. Because it is slower to bolt than other head lettuces, romaine can be grown commercially in Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 692 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-117

Root Crops

10/4/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Root crops include a number of vegetables grown for their enlarged, edible storage roots. The root crops discussed here are all hardy, cool-season crops with a long storage life. While they belong to several unrelated plant families, these crops have similar cultural requirements. This profile will overview several root crops grown in Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.70 mb
Pages: 4



HO-118

A Beginners Guide to Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky: Plans and Preparations

10/2/2017 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Ken Hunter, Bethany Pratt, John Strang

Begin by thinking about vegetables you and your family like to eat. Then think about what you want to grow. Some vegetables will grow better in Kentucky than others because of the average daily temperatures and amount of rainfall. It is also important to learn about the needs of each vegetable variety you are thinking about planting in your garden. Does it grow better in sun or shade? How much water does it need? What type of soil does it grow best in? Is it a cool season crop or a warm season crop?

Departments: County Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 7



PPA-48

Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Wheat Diseases

9/28/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kiersten Wise

The North Central Regional Committee on Management of Small Grain Diseases (NCERA-184) has developed the following information about fungicide efficacy for the control of certain foliar diseases of wheat for use by the grain production industry in the United States. The efficacy ratings for each fungicide listed in this table were determined by field testing the materials over multiple years and locations by the members of the committee.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Plant Pathology (PPA series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases, small grains
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 2



PPA-49

Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Corn Diseases

9/28/2017 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Kiersten Wise

The Corn Disease Working Group (CDWG) developed ratings for how well fungicides control major corn diseases in the United States. The CDWG determined efficacy ratings for each fungicide listed in the table by field testing the materials over multiple years and locations. Ratings are based on the product's level of disease control and does not necessarily reflect yield increases obtained from product application. A product's efficacy depends upon proper application timing, rate, and application method as determined by the product label and overall disease level in the field at the time of application.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Plant Pathology (PPA series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops, plant diseases
Size: 1.12 mb
Pages: 2



ID-247

Pastured Poultry

9/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore, Ray Smith

There has been an increased interest in pasture-raising poultry for both meat and egg production in the last decade. Raising poultry on pasture was a common occurrence until the latter half of the 20th century. Fresh forage provided an important ration balancing factor during the years before poultry nutritionists fully understood the required essential vitamins and minerals for growth and optimum meat and egg production. With the development of balanced rations, poultry no longer require access to pasture and year-round production of meat and eggs is possible. However, there are still some benefits from the lush forage, invertebrates, and exercise that pasture provides. In addition, we continue to learn more and more about the positive influence that fresh grasses and legumes have on fatty acid profiles and general bird health. As a result, there is an increased interest in pasture-raised poultry for both meat and eggs.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: livestock, nutrition and health, poultry
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 7



CCD-CP-120

Specialty Melons

9/20/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Specialty melons (Cucumis melo) have cultural requirements similar to the more familiar muskmelon (cantaloupe). These melons offer consumers outstanding eating quality and a range of flesh colors, textures, and flavors. With one exception, cultivars of the specialty types listed below have performed well in University of Kentucky research trials. Consult the Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers (ID-36) for the latest variety recommendations.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 950 kb
Pages: 3



ASC-206

Common External Parasites of Poultry

9/8/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore

Periodic examination of your flock is recommended so that infestations can be detected early and a larger flock outbreak contained. It is especially important to detect infestations early in food-producing poultry because there are restrictions on the treatments available.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 839 kb
Pages: 4



ID-244

Landscape Site Assessment

9/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

The most common reason trees and shrubs fail to perform as anticipated is that their cultural requirements differ from the site characteristics. People often plant things they know and love from a distant state, purchase because they are on sale, or find attractive but don't understand the environmental requirements. In some cases, a site can be easily modified to make it more suitable for a desired species. Most of the time, it is difficult or impossible to change the site characteristics enough for the plant to thrive. Appropriate watering is essential for establishment of recently transplanted trees and shrubs. This becomes even more important (and challenging) for plants poorly matched to their sites. Selecting plant species that will thrive under particular site conditions is an easier and less expensive option. The first step in doing this is to understand the site where you plan to plant.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 125 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-55

Stevia

9/5/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) is a small, herbaceous plant in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It is a perennial in its native South America, but is grown as an annual in all but the warmest areas of the United States. Stevia is commonly called "sweetleaf" or "sugarleaf."

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, specialty crops
Size: 791 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-62

High Tunnel Tomatoes

9/5/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels, also known as hoop houses, are simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures that typically do not use fans for ventilation. Tunnels can be covered with one or two sheets of plastic; those covered with two have an air layer in between, thus offering better insulation and, consequently, more cold protection (and wind protection). High tunnels are used to extend the growing season earlier into spring and later into fall. Determinate and indeterminate tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) can be successfully grown in this production system, yielding a potentially profitable "out of season."

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



AEC-ES-2017-12

The Unique Qualities of the Southern Milk Marketing Orders

9/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Kenny Burdine, Owen Townsend, Mark Tyler

Milk is a heavily regulated commodity, and therefore there are a large number of rules that pertain to its production and processing. These regulations are enforced within regional boundaries called federal milk marketing orders. Most milk marketing orders have similar regulations, but the Appalachian, Florida, and Southeast Orders are somewhat unique when it comes to diversion limits, transportation credits, and delivery day requirements. This publication will highlight these distinctive qualities of Southern milk marketing orders and how those qualities can influence production and processing in those orders.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Ag Economics Extension Series (AEC-ES series)
Tags:
Size: 551 kb
Pages: 10



AEC-ES-2017-13

The History and Class Pricing of the Federal Milk Marketing Orders

9/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Kenny Burdine, Owen Townsend, Mark Tyler

The regulation of milk is an important part of the development of the milk industry and an understanding of the history of milk regulation is critical to understanding the pros and cons of the current industry. Additionally, to understand milk pricing it is important to understand the history of the federal milk marketing orders. This publication will provide information on how milk became regulated and how the class pricing system works.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Ag Economics Extension Series (AEC-ES series)
Tags:
Size: 283 kb
Pages: 11



ASC-228

Body Condition Scoring Ewes

8/25/2017 (new)
Authors: Debra Aaron, Don Ely

Body condition scoring is a system of classifying breeding ewes on the basis of differences in body fat. While it is subjective, with practice it can be accurate enough to indicate the nutritional status of individual ewes as well as the entire flock. Thus, it allows the shepherd to identify, record, and adjust the feed intake of ewes determined to be thin, in average flesh, or fat. In the long run, this can save money for producers and/or prevent problems attributable to ewe condition.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: livestock, nutrition and health, sheep
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-130

Malabar Spinach

8/25/2017 (new)
Authors: Matthew Ernst

Malabar spinach is a leafy vine native to tropical Asia and is a commonly cultivated vegetable in Asia and Africa. Malabar spinach--also called Indian spinach, Ceylon spinach, climbing spinach and vine spinach--is a member of the Basellacea family. (Spinach commonly grown for market in North America is a member of the family Chenopodiaceae.) According to the University of Florida, Malabar spinach is also known as basella, gui, acelga trepadora, bretana, libato and Malabar nightshade.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-90

Cabbage

8/25/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Cabbage is a cool-season crop with a high cold tolerance; however, heads may bolt (flower prematurely) in warm temperatures.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 725 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-CP-76

Woody Cuts

8/22/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Woody cuts are portions of woody ornamentals used for floral or decorative purposes. These include foliage, flowering branches, fruit and seeds, as well as bare stems and branches. Numerous shrubs, trees, and woody vines can be grown commercially for these purposes. Cut flower growers may want to add woody cuts to their production line to diversify their products, expand their markets, and extend the floral season. Growers will need to be familiar with the different production and harvest requirements of a diverse group of plant material.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, specialty items
Size: 909 kb
Pages: 3



HO-116

Wine Distribution for Small Farm Wineries in Kentucky

8/22/2017 (new)
Authors: Ryan Baumgardner, Seth DeBolt

Small farm wineries in the state of Kentucky face a major issue when they look to expand, through wholesale distribution, into retail outlets. Like many states, Kentucky uses a "three-tier system" of distribution, where wineries must sell their product to a distributor, who then can legally sell the product to retailers. But because small- to medium-sized wineries rarely produce a volume that is attractive to major brand distributors, their products either don't make it to the retail shelves, or are placed suboptimally for their target market. Here, we look at ways to address this issue in order to help promote the wine industry from the wholesale point-of-view.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts
Size: 173 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-95

English and Edible Pod Peas

8/16/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Peas (Pisum sativum) are a cool-season vegetable that must be planted in early spring to ensure good yields in Kentucky. Fall planting of peas is also possible on a small scale, but they are very sensitive to warm temperatures and may not produce well. Types include the English pea (shelled for the fresh green seeds within non-edible pods), sugar snap types (round, fleshy edible pods), and Asian pod types (thin, flat edible pods) also referred to as snow peas.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 647 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-CP-93

Cucumber

8/15/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The cucumber (Cucumus sativus) is a warm-season vining crop in the Cucurbit family. Cucumbers suitable for immediate consumption are referred to as "slicers," while those for processing are "picklers." Although there once was a large pickling cucumber industry in Kentucky, nearly all cucumbers grown commercially in the state are now for fresh market consumption.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 729 kb
Pages: 3



CCD-FS-6

Three-Year Average Prices and Quantities at Kentucky Produce Auctions: 2014-2016

8/15/2017 (new)
Authors: Martin Bechu, Alex Butler, Brett Wolff, Tim Woods

This report compares average volumes and prices for 18 crops from two major Kentucky produce auctions for the 2014, 2015, and 2016 seasons.

Departments: Agricultural Economics
Series: Factsheets: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-FS series)
Tags: business and records, farm crops, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 22



CCD-CP-50

Catnip

8/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Catnip (Nepeta cataria), best known as a stimulant for cats, is a perennial herb in the mint family (Labiatae). Cats, both domestic and wild, are attracted to catnip mainly due to a compound known as nepatalactone present in plant tissues. In addition, catnip has several properties beneficial to humans. Once used as a folk remedy for a wide variety of medical problems, today catnip's essential oils are used in a number of pharmaceutical products and dietary supplements. For example, catnip contains thymol, a compound that can be used as antiseptic. Additionally, catnip extract has a mild anti-spasmodic effect that reduces muscle cramps. Leaves and stems are used in herbal tea mixtures and as flavorings in foods. Researchers have also found that catnip contains several chemicals (citronella, citral, carvacrol, and pulegone) that repel insects; thymol has fungicidal properties.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 451.73 mb
Pages: 3



CCD-CP-1

American Persimmon

8/10/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The American or common persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, is a slow-growing, moderately sized tree native to Kentucky. Fruit are about 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Unripe fruit, which are high in tannins, have an undesirable astringent taste. Fully ripened fruit, which are golden orange to reddish and occasionally blue in color, are very sweet. Cultivated varieties may have improved quality and lose their astringency earlier in the fall.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 676 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-133

Tire Tanks for Watering Livestock

8/8/2017 (new)
Authors: Carmen Agouridis, Steve Higgins, Joshua Jackson, Lee Moser

Kentucky's abundant forage and extensive stream system have helped the Commonwealth become the largest beef producing state east of the Mississippi River. While streams and ponds serve as a water source for many operations, livestock can quickly degrade soil and water quality by trampling streambanks and defecating and urinating in and around waterbodies. These actions increase sediment, pathogen, and nutrient loads to streams, rivers, and lakes which in turn can causes eutrophication. To help protect the health of Kentucky's soil and water, producers can implement best management practices (BMPs). These practices help reduce the sources of pollutants and/or the transport of pollutants to waterways. One such practice or BMP is limiting cattle access to streams and ponds. When producers exclude livestock access to stream and ponds and their associated riparian buffers, an alternative source of water is required. Automatic water fountains are one commonly used means of providing cattle with water from an alternate source. A water tank constructed using a heavy equipment tire may serve as a viable option for supplying livestock with an alternate source of water.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 4.65 mb
Pages: 8



FCS5-465

Planning Your Digital Estate

8/8/2017 (new)
Authors: Alex Elswick, Jennifer Hunter

With so much vital information stored online, the nature of estate planning has changed. Although you may still have many important documents in paper format, it is likely that much of your financial documents are digitized. It may seem obvious that important digital information such as online bank accounts should be addressed in estate planning, but other kinds of digital assets such as social media accounts, text messages, or even pictures stored in the cloud may have sentimental value for your loved ones. Email accounts and online retail accounts may house critical personal information that you may wish securely kept. Unfortunately, planning for these kinds of assets is typically neglected by individuals and their advisors. In order to ensure the safety and security of this kind of digital information, you will want to create a digital estate plan.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, HES Family Sciences
Series: Family Resource Management (FCS5 series)
Tags:
Size: 350 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-OR-W-26

Volutella Blight of Boxwood

8/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Adam Leonberger, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Volutella blight (also called Pseudonectria canker) is the most common disease of boxwood in Kentucky landscapes and nurseries. This disease is caused by an opportunistic fungal pathogen that attacks leaves and stems of damaged or stressed plants. Winter injury, poor vigor, and stem wounds increase risk for Volutella blight. All species and cultivars of boxwood are susceptible.

Departments: County Extension, Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Tags: garden and landscape, plant diseases, shrubs and grasses
Size: 1.57 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-OR-W-6

Flowering Dogwood Diseases

8/1/2017 (major revision)
Authors: Sarah Stolz, Nicole Ward Gauthier

The flowering dogwood is one of the most popular ornamental trees in Kentucky landscapes. Different cultivars, as well as different species and hybrids, offer a variety of flower and plant characteristics. Unfortunately, some common diseases can threaten the health of dogwood in both residential and commercial settings.

Departments: County Extension, Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 500 kb
Pages: 6



ID-246

Measuring the Ph of Different Food Products

7/21/2017 (new)
Authors: Akinbode Adedeji, Paul Vijayakumar

The scientific scale for measuring how acidic or basic a substance is when it is dissolved in water is called pH. The pH scale runs from 0 - 14. 0 means it is very acidic, 7 means it is neither acidic nor basic, but just right in the middle like plain water (neutral), and 14 means it is very basic. If you are producing a food product that depends on the acidic components or ingredients of the product to extend its shelf life and ensure the safety of the product, monitoring the pH of food products is very important. Food safety is the biggest reason for monitoring pH, but pH also influences the quality of food products.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 365 kb
Pages: 2



CCD-CP-100

Heirloom Vegetables

7/17/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Heirloom vegetables are vintage varieties that have been preserved by passing seed down from generation to generation. These varieties are generally 50 to 100 years old, although many are much older. All heirlooms are open-pollinated and usually breed true-to-type. Heirlooms were often selected for flavor potential and eating quality before vegetable breeding emphasized hybrid varieties bred for uniformity in size, shape and ripening, as well as for durability in shipping

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 652 kb
Pages: 4



CCD-CP-71

Garden Mums

7/13/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

The garden mum (Chrysanthemum spp.) is a popular herbaceous perennial flowering plant that is commonly grown for fall sales. While also referred to as 'hardy mums,' their actual hardiness outdoors (that is, their ability to survive the winter) can vary by cultivar, time of planting, and environmental conditions. Garden mums are generally container-grown in Kentucky, either in a greenhouse or outdoors in connection with a greenhouse business; there is also some field production in the state.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: flowers, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 3



SR-111

Economic Analysis of the University of Kentucky Community Supported Agriculture Organic Vegetable Production System

7/12/2017 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Carl Dillon, Tiffany Thompson, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Farms marketing through a vegetable CSA are complex businesses facing many operational and economic challenges. To be economically viable, CSA farms must achieve the appropriate match of crops, equipment, and labor with farm size and number of CSA members. A diverse array of vegetable crops are typically grown with unique requirements for crop production, pest management, harvest, and post-harvest handling. An extensive suite of skills, tools, and equipment are required to produce these crops efficiently, and mechanization becomes critical as the number of acres in production increases.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags: farm crops, organic production, production practices, research, vegetables
Size: 6.50 mb
Pages: 28



CCD-CP-60

High Tunnel Leafy Greens and Herbs

7/11/2017 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

High tunnels and other season extension techniques allow producers to extend the time period over which cash flows are generated from produce crops. High tunnel production is expanding to supply the increasing demand for locally grown produce, as well as policy and grant programs favoring high tunnel production. High tunnel production of leafy greens and herbs can also enable producers to market products at higher prices, before the start of a traditional local season. High tunnel leafy greens and herbs are typically added by producers already selling through direct markets: farmers markets, CSAs (community supported agriculture programs), and direct to local restaurants and groceries.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, production practices, vegetables
Size: 893 kb
Pages: 5