University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Julie Beale



Dothistroma Needle Blight of Pine
7/1/2017 (new)

Dothistroma needle blight disease afflicts some of the pine species commonly planted in Kentucky landscapes, resulting in needle browning and unattractive trees. Austrian pine and Mugo pine are most commonly affected. Dothistroma needle blight is infrequently observed on spruce. A closely related fungal disease called brown spot needle blight occasionally affects Scots pine or white pine, although this disease is less common in Kentucky. | PPFS-OR-W-25
web only | 3 pages | 256 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,053 kb


Common Diseases of Spruce in Kentucky
6/1/2016 (new)

Spruce trees, particularly blue spruce (Picea pungens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies), are popular specimen trees and screening conifers in Kentucky landscapes. Unfortunately, they can present problems for homeowners as a result of poor vigor, dieback, or needle drop. A combination of infectious disease and environmental stress is often to blame. | PPFS-OR-W-24
web only | 5 pages | 1,627 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 2,118 kb


When White Pines Turn Brown: Common Problems of White Pines in Kentucky
4/1/2015 (new)

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is a popular conifer in many Kentucky landscapes, although its use may be limited to loose, well-drained, pathogen-free soil. Often, needle browning is the primary symptom that alerts homeowners and nursery growers of health problems. In Kentucky, brown needles on white pine are often caused by one of the following three conditions: white pine decline, white pine root decline (Procerum root rot), or Phytophthora root rot. | PPFS-OR-W-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,497 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,170 kb


2014 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/7/2015 (new)

The 2014 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in three counties in Kentucky, including: Mason, Shelby, and Spencer. | PR-688
web only | 42 pages | 29,201 words | 68 downloads | PDF: 950 kb


Diplodia Tip Blight of Pine
1/1/2015 (new)

Tip blight is a serious disease of landscape pines in Kentucky. Pines such as Austrian (Pinus nigra), Scots (P. sylvestris), and Mugo (P. mugo) are most commonly affected. Other landscape conifers occasionally may be affected by tip blight as well. Tip blight disease has not been found on eastern white pine (P. strobus). | PPFS-OR-W-21
web only | 3 pages | 922 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,268 kb


Diagnosis of "No Disease"
3/1/2014 (new)

Extension Agents and growers may occasionally receive diagnostic reports from the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory that indicate "no disease was found." One or both of the following explanations may account for the diagnosis of "No Disease." | PPFS-GEN-11
web only | 3 pages | 916 words | 1 download | PDF: 867 kb


Submitting Plant Specimens for Disease Diagnosis
3/1/2014 (new)

Diagnosis of plant diseases is one of the many ways that the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and UK Cooperative Extension serve the citizens of Kentucky. This publication is designed to help growers collect and submit the best plant samples for an accurate diagnosis. | PPFS-GEN-9
web only | 7 pages | 872 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 2,312 kb


2012 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/6/2012 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2012 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and several demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in more than 15 counties in Kentucky. Research was conducted by faculty and staff from several departments within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture including: Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Agricultural Economics. This report also includes collaborative research projects conducted with faculty and staff at Kentucky State University. | PR-656
web only | 47 pages | 21,679 words | 54 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Black Root Rot of Ornamentals
5/1/2012 (minor revision)

Black root rot can affect a wide range of ornamentals in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and greenhouses. In Kentucky, this disease is commonly observed on Japanese and blue hollies, inkberry, pansy, petunia, and vinca. In addition to ornamentals, numerous vegetable and agronomic crops are susceptible. | PPFS-OR-W-3
web only | 3 pages | 873 words | 1 download | PDF: 585 kb


Sample Submission Protocol for Diagnosis of Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut
2/1/2012 (new)

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a fatal disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra), and most recently, butternut (Juglans cinerea). The disease complex involves a fungus that is carried to trees by the walnut twig beetle, causing numerous cankers on branches and killing trees 5 to 6 years after infection. The disease complex is widespread in the western U.S., and has recently been identified in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. | PPFS-OR-W-15
web only | 2 pages | 557 words | 1 download | PDF: 361 kb


2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2011 (new)

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-626
web only | 53 pages | 26,604 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,391 kb


2010 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
1/28/2011 (new)

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry. | PR-621
web only | 29 pages | 15,271 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 629 kb


2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2010 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky. | PR-608
1,000 printed copies | 70 pages | - | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


2009 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/11/2009 (new)

The 2009 Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report includes results for more than 45 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 19 counties in Kentucky. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools that they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-603
1,000 printed copies | 56 pages | - | 15 downloads | PDF: 850 kb


Downy Mildew of Grape
9/1/2008 (new)

Downy mildew is an important disease of commercial and backyard grapes in Kentucky. This disease causes direct losses when flowers, clusters, and shoots decay and yields are reduced. Indirect losses result when premature defoliation predisposes grapevines to winter injury. It may take a vineyard several years to fully recover after severe winter injury. | PPFS-FR-S-13
web only | 3 pages | 987 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 282 kb


Black Rot of Crucifers
2/1/2008 (minor revision)

Black rot, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), can be a very destructive disease of cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli. Other susceptible crucifers include: collards, kale, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, turnip, mustard, radish, and rutabaga. | PPFS-VG-1
web only | 3 pages | 792 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 227 kb


Blueberry Diseases
1/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky blueberry growers sometimes experience plant and crop losses due to diseases. While most losses are due to root rot, or to stem and twig canker diseases, fruit rots and nutritional problems can also reduce yields. With good crop management, most blueberry diseases can be avoided. | PPFS-FR-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,107 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 292 kb


Blossom End Rot
1/1/2008 (minor revision)

Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder (non-parasitic disease) caused by a lack of calcium (Ca) in the distal ends of developing fruit. Calcium is an essential part of the chemical "glue" that binds cells together within the fruit. When fruits are enlarging rapidly, sufficient amounts of Ca fail to reach the end of the fruit and cells then come apart. This is because Ca is not a very mobile element, so any disruption in uptake of Ca can result in a deficiency of Ca in developing fruit. | PPFS-VG-2
web only | 2 pages | 518 words | 1 download | PDF: 165 kb