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Ric Bessin



Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers, 2018-19
12/11/2017 (major revision)

Successful vegetable production generally requires the grower to make daily decisions regarding pest management, irrigation, and cultural practices. The most widely commercially-grown vegetables in Kentucky are included in this publication. | ID-36
3,000 printed copies | 140 pages | 109,401 words | 130 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


Economic Analysis of the University of Kentucky Community Supported Agriculture Organic Vegetable Production System
7/12/2017 (new)

Farms marketing through a vegetable CSA are complex businesses facing many operational and economic challenges. To be economically viable, CSA farms must achieve the appropriate match of crops, equipment, and labor with farm size and number of CSA members. A diverse array of vegetable crops are typically grown with unique requirements for crop production, pest management, harvest, and post-harvest handling. An extensive suite of skills, tools, and equipment are required to produce these crops efficiently, and mechanization becomes critical as the number of acres in production increases. | SR-111
200 printed copies | 28 pages | 8,907 words | 12 downloads | PDF: 6,500 kb


Manejo Integrado de Plagas
6/15/2017 (reprinted)

La sociedad moderna demanda alimentos variados y de buena calidad, esto implica un reto para los agricultores de frutas, hortalizas y granos, ya que deben producir lo suficiente para obtener ganancias y al mismo tiempo, evitar la contaminacion del producto requerido por la poblacion. El Manejo Integrado de Plagas, es una herramienta importante en el manejo de los cultivos, ya que propone alternativas de control que no se limitan unicamente al uso de pesticidas, sino tambien, a tomar ventaja de los recursos existentes en el campo, tales como, organismos beneficos, plantas florales, biologia de la plaga, rotacion de cultivos, labores culturales apropiadas y otros mas que permiten manejar con perspectiva ambiental los problemas encontrados. | ID-181
1,500 printed copies | 20 pages | 9,096 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 651 kb


Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky, 2016
12/21/2016 (reprinted)

A well-planned and properly kept garden should produce 600 to 700 pounds of produce per 1,000 square feet and may include many different crops. Consult "Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens" (ID-133) for the latest recommendations on home vegetable varieties. | ID-128
1 printed copies | 48 pages | 32,061 words | 443 downloads | PDF: 4,000 kb


2016 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/13/2016 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collection of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry. | PR-721
1,000 printed copies | 40 pages | 20,554 words | 51 downloads | PDF: 2,804 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Strawberry in Kentucky
11/17/2016 (new)

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky strawberry plantings. | ID-238
1,600 printed copies | 28 pages | 6,288 words | 28 downloads | PDF: 10,025 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky
7/8/2016 (new)

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance. | ID-235
2,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 5,187 words | 43 downloads | PDF: 5,436 kb


Backyard Berry Disease and Disease Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-25
web only | 4 pages | 1,260 words | 32 downloads | PDF: 1,037 kb


Backyard Grape Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 1,263 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,213 kb


Backyard Stone Fruit Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,234 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 890 kb


Backyard Apple Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-21
web only | 4 pages | 1,311 words | 27 downloads | PDF: 1,013 kb


Simplified Backyard Grape Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A simplified backyard grape spray guide (table). | PPFS-FR-S-23
web only | 1 pages | 323 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 351 kb


Simplified Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Peach, nectarine, apricot, plum, and cherry are all stone fruits. Production of these tree fruits requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. Disease resistant cultivars are the preferred method for reducing spray inputs. | PPFS-FR-T-20
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 672 kb


Simplified Backyard Apple Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Apple production requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. | PPFS-FR-T-18
web only | 4 pages | 1,284 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 626 kb


Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos Cucurbitaceos en Kentucky
7/15/2015 (new)

Esta guia cubre los problemas abioticos y bioticos mas comunes que ocurren en cucurbitaceas (Familia Curcubitaceae) en Kentucky. Este grupo de plantas, al que tambien se refiere como enredaderas trepadoras, incluye al pepino, melon (cantalope), sandia, melones especiales, calabazas (o zapallos), calabacines, y cogordas (conocidas tambien como calabazas de peregrino, ayotes, jicaras, o porongos [gourds en ingles]). | ID-91s
2,500 printed copies | 24 pages | 8,426 words | 26 downloads | PDF: 1,743 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Legume Vegetables in Kentucky
1/30/2015 (new)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" (but rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. Proper identification is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during bean and pea production in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter a problem that is not included here. Please contact your county Extension service for assistance. | ID-227
1,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 6,479 words | 42 downloads | PDF: 33,000 kb


Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos de Solanaceas on Kentucky
7/9/2014 (new)

La identificacion correcta de los patogenos y de insectos plagas, asi como los trastornos nutricionales y fisiologicos e incluso derivas de herbicidas es esencial para determinar el curso apropiado de accion. Las imagenes incluidas en esta guia representan algunas plagas o problemas comunes que los agricultores pueden encontrar cuando se producen cultivos de solanaceas (tomates, pimientos, berenjena y papas) en Kentucky. | ID-172s
1,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 7,500 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 5,600 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Sweet Corn in Kentucky
6/3/2014 (reprinted)

In terms of acreage, sweet corn is the largest commercial vegetable crop grown in Kentucky. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs have played an important role in its production and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" but not necessarily eliminated in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-184
4,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 5,437 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 1,054 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Apple in Kentucky
5/7/2014 (new)

The National Integrated Pest Management Network defines IPM as "a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks." One of the key components of IPM is to continually scout and monitor crops to identify problems before they result in significant economic losses. Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during apple production in Kentucky. | ID-219
3,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 5,056 words | 42 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Disease and Insect Control Program for Home Grown Fruit in Kentucky
4/29/2014 (reprinted)

Many homeowners in Kentucky grow a variety of fruits in their garden and are rewarded for their effort. One distinct advantage homeowners have over commercial orchardists is the diverse ecosystem of the home landscape (vegetable gardens, flower and fruit plantings intermixed with turf and landscape plants). Diversity often reduces the spread of insect and disease organisms and tends to keep their populations at lower, more manageable levels. | ID-21
1,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 10,516 words | 128 downloads | PDF: 1,000 kb


Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits
4/1/2014 (new)

Bacterial wilt is a common, often destructive, disease of cucurbits. This disease can cause nearly complete losses of a planting before the first harvest. Bacterial wilt primarily affects cucumber and muskmelon (cantaloupe). While squash and pumpkin are also susceptible, the damage to these hosts is usually less severe. | PPFS-VG-11
web only | 3 pages | 1,044 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 575 kb


Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits Quick Facts
4/1/2014 (new)

Highlights from the publication Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits, PPFS-VG-11. | PPFS-VG-11-QF
web only | 2 pages | 300 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 786 kb


2013 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/8/2014 (new)

Variety trials included in this year's publication include: cabbage, asparagus, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, apples, peaches, and grapes. Additional research trials include organic management of cucumber beetles, financial comparison of organic potato integrated pest management systems, and effect of organic fertilizer materials for production of kale. | PR-673
web only | 44 pages | 23,586 words | 76 downloads | PDF: 2,491 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cole Crops in Kentucky
7/22/2013 (new)

Cole crops are important as a group, particularly when all acreage of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts are combined. Spring planted crops may have very different problems associated with them compared to fall crops. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs fill an important role in production of these crops and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed," but not necessarily eliminated, in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-216
3,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 4,491 words | 39 downloads | PDF: 5,300 kb


Sweetpotato Production for Kentucky
2/21/2012 (new)

Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a member of the morningglory or Convolvulaceae family. Sweetpotatoes have their origins in tropical America, with early remains having been found in Panama, Peru and Mexico. A perennial plant in their native regions, they are typically killed by frost when grown in a temperate climate. Sweetpotatoes are true roots and not tubers as is the case with the Irish Potato (Solanum tuberosum). Because they are true roots they will continue to grow and enlarge as long as the plant continues to grow. | ID-195
500 printed copies | 16 pages | 6,240 words | 48 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2011 (new)

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-626
web only | 53 pages | 26,604 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,391 kb


Climate Change: A Brief Summary for Kentucky Extension Agents
9/20/2011 (new)

Nearly all climate science experts agree that global warming is occurring and that it is caused primarily by human activity. Regardless of what you may read on blogs or in the media, there is no meaningful scientific controversy on these points. The future impacts of global warming are difficult to predict, but the changes caused by greenhouse gases are expected to increasingly affect Kentucky agriculture. | ID-191
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,975 words | 53 downloads | PDF: 250 kb


Yellow Vine Decline of Cucurbits
8/1/2011 (new)

Symptoms of yellow vine decline begin to appear approximately 2 weeks before fruit maturity. The disease may appear initially as stunting of plants and/or intense yellowing of foliage, followed by a slow decline in plant health. In some cases, a sudden collapse of vines may occur with no other symptoms. Vascular tissue (phloem) from crowns of affected plants is often discolored, appearing light brown rather than a healthy translucent green. | PPFS-VG-12
web only | 3 pages | 824 words | 1 download | PDF: 454 kb


An IPM Identification Guide for Natural Enemies of Vegetable Pests
5/16/2011 (new)

Natural enemies play a crucial role in the management of insect and other arthropod pests of vegetable crops grown throughout Kentucky. The control they exert on pest populations is realized on every farm every day. Often the value of natural enemies may be overlooked or taken for granted, but as a group they slow the buildup of pest populations and keep some pests from reaching economic levels. | ENT-67
4,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 6,732 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 1,700 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Pests of Solanaceous Crops in Kentucky
4/29/2011 (minor revision)

Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter when producing solanaceous crops (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and potatoes) in Kentucky. | ID-172
3,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 7,500 words | 36 downloads | PDF: 2,000 kb


2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2010 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky. | PR-608
1,000 printed copies | 70 pages | - | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Nut Tree Growing in Kentucky
4/22/2010 (major revision)

Kentucky is generally well suited for growing nut trees. Northern pecans, black walnuts, heartnuts, hickory nuts, hardy Persian walnuts (Carpathian strain), American hazelnuts, and Chinese chestnuts all grow well in the state. Although most nut trees are grown by hobbyists and backyard gardeners, several varieties appear to have potential for commercial production, particularly some of the USDA pecan selections and some Chinese chestnut varieties. | ID-77
web only | 24 pages | - | 52 downloads | PDF: 680 kb


Corn and Soybean Production Calendar
12/16/2009 (reprinted)

The Corn and Soybean Production Calendar was developed to help producers prioritize and schedule work events in a timely fashion on the farm. Weather events and equipment breakdowns rarely follow an organized schedule. However, if other practices within the farming operation are prioritized, perhaps a producer can better address the emergencies that will occur. | ID-159
2,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 23 downloads | PDF: 650 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cucurbit Crops in Kentucky
7/27/2009 (minor revision)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed to reduce their negative impact on the crop, although pests are rarely eliminated. | ID-91
5,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 6,729 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 1,863 kb


Ornamental Corn Production
7/10/2008 (minor revision)

| HO-81
1,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 1,234 kb


Growing Peaches in Kentucky
3/30/2007 (minor revision)

| HO-57
1,500 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 73 downloads | PDF: 978 kb


Ornamental Gourd Production in Kentucky
1/3/2007 (minor revision)

| ID-119
2,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 21 downloads | PDF: 281 kb


2006 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-538
1,100 printed copies | 82 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,337 kb


2005 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/30/2005 (new)

| PR-521
1,100 printed copies | 98 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,555 kb


Bt Basics for Vegetable Integrated Pest Management
8/1/2005 (new)

| ID-156
2,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 18 downloads | PDF: 655 kb


Growers' Guide to Bt
8/1/2005 (new)

| ID-156A
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 21 downloads | PDF: 478 kb


2004 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2004 (new)

| PR-504
1,100 printed copies | 74 pages | - | 11 downloads | PDF: 1,899 kb


2003 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2003 (new)

| PR-488
1,100 printed copies | - | - | 1 download | HTML: 1 kb


2002 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/3/2003 (new)

| PR-470
1,000 printed copies | 65 pages | - | - | PDF: 2,400 kb


2001 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/4/2002 (new)

| PR-452
1,100 printed copies | 60 pages | - | - | PDF: 437 kb


A Comprehensive Guide to Corn Management in Kentucky
9/30/2001 (new)

The corn grown in Kentucky is used mainly for livestock feed and as a cash crop. As a cash crop sold from the farm, corn ranks third behind tobacco and soybeans but is the number one row crop in terms of acreage. Because the cost of producing an acre of corn is high and the value per bushel has declined in recent years, producers must manage and market their corn crop more carefully for adequate profits. The goal of this publication is to serve as a guide for corn production strategies that focus on efficient use of resources and provide the principles and practices for obtaining maximum, profitable corn yields. | ID-139
7,500 printed copies | 64 pages | 37,214 words | 52 downloads | PDF: 639 kb


Agricultural Biotechnology and the Environment
9/15/2001 (reprinted)

| BREI-2
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 228 kb


Food Biotechnology
9/1/2001 (reprinted)

| BREI-3
5,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 29 downloads | PDF: 323 kb


Total Quality Assurance Apple Production: Best Management Practices
5/1/2001 (new)

| ID-137
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 32 downloads | PDF: 271 kb


Asian Lady Beetle Infestation of Structures
3/20/2001 (reprinted)

| ENT-64
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 14 downloads | PDF: 247 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report 2000
12/3/2000 (new)

| PR-436
1,100 printed copies | 57 pages | - | - | PDF: 768 kb


Beginning Beekeeping for Kentuckians
11/17/2000 (reprinted)

| ENT-41
3,500 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 35 downloads | PDF: 718 kb


Food Biotechnology Teaching Guide
9/1/2000 (new)

| BREI-3TG
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 24 downloads | PDF: 298 kb


Growing Grapes in Kentucky
4/30/2000 (reprinted)

Kentucky has a long record of good grape production. As a home fruit crop or commercial crop, grapes have many benefits. Grapevines are relatively inexpensive and easy to propagate. They reach full bearing potential in four years and bear annually. The many varieties of grapes can be consumed fresh or used to make grape juice, jams, jellies, and wine. Grapes are also easy to manage. Vines are trained on trellises or arbors and easily can be sprayed using small equipment for control of insects and diseases. | ID-126
3,000 printed copies | 24 pages | - | 70 downloads | PDF: 238 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crop Research Report 1999
12/31/1999 (new)

| PR-423
750 printed copies | 43 pages | - | - | PDF: 712 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Program: 1998 Research Report
12/1/1998 (new)

The emphases in our research program reflect industry-defined needs, expertise available at UK, and the nature of research projects around the world generating information applicable to Kentucky. Although the purpose of this publication is to report research results, the report also highlights our Extension program and Undergraduate and Graduate degree programs that address the needs of the horticultural industries. | PR-410
web only | 46 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 335 kb


Midwest Tree Fruit Pest Management Handbook
11/1/1998 (new)

| ID-93
5,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 3 kb


Greenhouse Insect Management
6/15/1995 (reprinted)

| ENT-60
1,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 19 downloads | PDF: 123 kb


Cutworm Management in Corn
3/1/1994 (reprinted)

| ENT-59
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 175 kb