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Joey Clark


PR-749

2018 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. Table 5 shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 18 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 350 kb
Pages: 4



PR-750

2018 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. Table 10 shows a summary of all white clover varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 15 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 504 kb
Pages: 6



PR-751

2018 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.45 mb
Pages: 14



PR-735

2017 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/18/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 12



PR-733

2017 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 413 kb
Pages: 4



PR-734

2017 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 4



PR-717

2016 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

11/18/2016 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.24 mb
Pages: 12



PR-715

2016 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/17/2016 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 397 kb
Pages: 4



PR-716

2016 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/17/2016 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 440 kb
Pages: 4



PR-700

2015 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/14/2015 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 525 kb
Pages: 6



PR-701

2015 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/14/2015 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 530 kb
Pages: 6



PR-702

2015 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/14/2015 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 12



PR-684

2014 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/4/2014 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue and orchardgrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and prairie brome can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 12



PR-682

2014 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/2/2014 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 550 kb
Pages: 4



PR-683

2014 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/2/2014 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of red and white clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 660 kb
Pages: 6



PR-667

2013 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/25/2013 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of red and white clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 700 kb
Pages: 6



PR-666

2013 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/22/2013 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 680 kb
Pages: 4



PR-651

2012 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/14/2012 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue and orchardgrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and prairie brome can be used in pasture systems. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 475 kb
Pages: 12



PR-649

2012 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2012 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 670 kb
Pages: 8



PR-650

2012 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2012 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two and a half to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield, and animal acceptance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 650 kb
Pages: 6



PR-633

2011 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/23/2011 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 402 kb
Pages: 4



PR-634

2011 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/23/2011 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Garry Lacefield, Gene Olson, Ray Smith

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 322 kb
Pages: 4



PR-635

2011 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/23/2011 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue and orchardgrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and prairie brome can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 387 kb
Pages: 10