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Rick Durham


HO-101

Care of Woody Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 17

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham

To prune or not to prune? This is a question that often faces gardeners. Most feel they ought to prune but are not sure why or how.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 2.73 mb
Pages: 14



HO-102

Annual and Perennial Flowers: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 18

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Rick Durham

Can you imagine a world without flowers? Their textures, colors, scents, and forms inspire gardeners, artists, and writers. The desire to grow flowers often motivates novices to take up gardening and moves experienced gardeners to become flower specialists. Annuals, biennials, and herbaceous perennials offer variety and interest to all styles of gardens.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 10



HO-103

Indoor Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 19

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Rick Durham

Cultivating plants inside the home is both a popular hobby and an interior decorating technique. More than 75 percent of all American families use living plants as part of their home decor or cultural expression.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.66 mb
Pages: 10



HO-105

Landscape Design: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 14

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham

Landscape designs differ depending on how the landscape will be used. Although the principles are the same, a homeowner who wants an aesthetically pleasing, low-maintenance landscape will create a design very different than that of an avid gardener whose main purpose in life is to spend time in the garden.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 2.46 mb
Pages: 16



HO-107

Selecting and Planting Woody Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 16

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

Woody ornamental plants are key components of a well-designed landscape. Landscape plantings divide and define areas, add aesthetic and psychological benefits, and increase a property's environmental and economic value.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 2.09 mb
Pages: 14



HO-96

Basic Botany: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 1

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham

Plants are essential to life on earth. Either directly or indirectly, they are the primary food source for humans and other animals. Additionally, they provide fuel, replenish the earth's oxygen supply, prevent soil erosion, slow down wind movement, cool the atmosphere, provide wildlife habitat, supply medicinal compounds, and beautify our surroundings.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 4.27 mb
Pages: 22



HO-97

Plant Identification: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 2

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham

Learning about new plants is an exciting venture. Sometimes you are looking for a plant to fill a certain spot in your garden. At other times, you want to complete a particular color scheme, or your attention is caught by a magnificent tree, shrub, or perennial in a public or private garden.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 351 kb
Pages: 4



HO-98

Plant Propagation: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 3

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham

Sexual propagation involves the union of the pollen (male) with the egg (female) to produce a seed. The seed is made up of three parts: the outer seed coat, which protects the seed; the endosperm, which is a food reserve; and the embryo, which is the young plant itself.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.38 mb
Pages: 12



ID-192

Composting: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 13

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Gardeners have long made and used compost to improve garden soil.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 908 kb
Pages: 6



ID-194

Diagnosing Plant Problems: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 6

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Jessica Bessin, Rick Durham, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Adam Leonberger, Kimberly Leonberger, Matthew Springer, Lee Townsend, Stacy White, Erica Wood

For those with a green thumb, growing plants may seem easy. However, when plant problems arise, determining the cause of these issues can be difficult. Developing the skills necessary to determine the cause of a plant problem takes experience and time.

Departments: Bell County, Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Franklin County, Hopkins County, Horticulture, Mercer County, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 15.53 mb
Pages: 24



ID-201

Your Yard and Water Quality: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 12

1/16/2024 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee

We generally view gardening as a wholesome activity that enhances our environment. But pesticides, fertilizers, and erosion from gardens and landscapes can contaminate lakes, streams, rivers, oceans, and groundwater. Since the quality of our water resources affects our quality of life, we must learn how gardening practices can contribute to water contamination and how to reduce the threat to water quality.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 749 kb
Pages: 6



NEP-233

Growing Your Own: Composting

11/16/2023 (new)
Authors: Daniel Bowen, Rick Durham, Erika Olsen, Rachel Rudolph

Composting is the controlled breakdown of materials such as leaves, grass clippings, and food scraps, also called organic matter. During composting, tiny microorganisms feed on these leftovers. Once the microorganisms are done eating, compost will be all that remains.

Departments: Extension Office, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 3.33 mb
Pages: 4



HENV-712

BMP Maintenance and Operation: Filter Strip

10/12/2023 (new)
Authors: Benjamin Currens, Andrea Drayer, Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Filter strips are planted and maintained strips of vegetation designed to provide pretreatment of stormwater runoff before it flows into adjacent best management practices (BMPs). Gently sloped, the dense vegetation within the strip reduces the speed of stormwater. This allows for the capture of sediment as stormwater from impervious surfaces passes through the filter strip.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 7.32 mb
Pages: 4



HENV-713

BMP Maintenance and Operation: Retention Basin

10/12/2023 (new)
Authors: Benjamin Currens, Andrea Drayer, Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Retention basins, or wet ponds, retain a deep, permanent pool of water that can collect stormwater and release it slowly to maintain a desired water level, after which the excess stormwater is released slowly via an outlet (drawdown orifice). Retention basins should always have a baseline level of water present and may be vegetated. Retention basins provide a higher level of pollutant retention (up to 80 percent) and a lower chance of sediment resuspension than detention basins (dry ponds).

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 6.80 mb
Pages: 5



HENV-714

BMP Maintenance and Operation: Grass Swale

10/12/2023 (new)
Authors: Benjamin Currens, Andrea Drayer, Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Grass swales, or dry swales, are designed to transport stormwater, promote infiltration, and capture sediment during a storm event. Grass swales are turfgrass-planted channels constructed with wide bottoms to encourage infiltration of stormwater into the underlying soil. Vegetation in the channel functions to reduce the speed of stormwater and trap sediment as water is conveyed through the channel. When functioning properly, these swales hold water no longer than six hours after a storm and should remain dry until the next storm event.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 5.57 mb
Pages: 4



HENV-715

BMP Maintenance and Operation: Detention Basin

10/12/2023 (new)
Authors: Benjamin Currens, Andrea Drayer, Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Detention basins, or dry ponds, are designed to collect water during a storm event and hold it for a certain amount of time, usually 48 hours. This short impoundment of stormwater allows pollutants carried in the stormwater to settle to the bottom of the basin before collected stormwater is released through a slow-release outlet. When functioning properly, these basins should remain dry after the release of water until the next storm event.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 8.23 mb
Pages: 4



ID-1

The Kentucky Extension Master Gardener Program

8/24/2023 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Tom Barnes, Jessica Bessin, Kenneth Clayton, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, J.D. Green, Kelly Jackson, Krista Jacobsen, Jonathan Larson, Brad Lee, Kimberly Leonberger, Adam Leonberger, Gregg Munshaw, A.J. Powell, Edwin Ritchey, Rachel Rudolph, Robbie Smith, Matthew Springer, Lee Townsend, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Stacy White, Mark Williams, Erica Wood, Shawn Wright

Plants are essential to life on earth. Either directly or indirectly, they are the primary food source for humans and other animals. Additionally, they provide fuel, replenish the earth's oxygen supply, prevent soil erosion, slow down wind movement, cool the atmosphere, provide wildlife habitat, supply medicinal compounds, and beautify our surroundings.

Departments: Bell County, Christian County, County Extension, Entomology, Extension Office, Forestry and Natural Resources, Franklin County, Hopkins County, Horticulture, Mercer County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 63.04 mb
Pages: 336



NEP-231

Growing Your Own: Potatoes

7/6/2023 (new)
Authors: Daniel Bowen, Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Potatoes grow well in the spring or fall. They are not roots but tubers, which are a type of stem. Potatoes are a good source of vitamins B and C, potassium, and complex carbohydrates.

Departments: Extension Office, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.59 mb
Pages: 5



NEP-232

Growing Your Own: Sweet Potatoes

7/6/2023 (new)
Authors: Daniel Bowen, Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Add sweet potatoes to your garden this year if you have enough space. Despite what their name suggests, sweet potatoes (sometimes written as the single-word "sweetpotatoes") are not related to white potatoes. They like to grow in warm weather. They are healthy and a good source of vitamin A and vitamin C.

Departments: Extension Office, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 4.17 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-227

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Beets

3/9/2021 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Beets, planted in the spring, grow well in Kentucky. They are easy to grow and quick to mature. Both the roots and the leaves are edible.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-228

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Radishes

3/9/2021 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Radishes are easy and fast to grow and only take up a little space. Radish roots are low in calories and high in vitamins C, K, and B6. Because they require little time and space, radishes are great vegetables for children to grow. This publication will discuss only spring radishes.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 4



ID-128

Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky, 2021

3/1/2021 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Rachel Rudolph, Mark Williams, Shawn Wright

A well-planned and properly kept garden should produce 600 to 700 pounds of produce per 1,000 square feet and may include many different crops. Consult "Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens" (ID-133) for the latest recommendations on home vegetable varieties.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 4.80 mb
Pages: 56



NEP-225

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Broccoli

9/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Broccoli is a cool-season plant in the same family as cabbage and cauliflower. It, and others in the same family, is known as a cole crop. Broccoli can be grown in both the fall and the spring and can be eaten many ways.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.38 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-226

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Kale

9/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

In recent years, kale has been a "super food" because of the ways it can benefit our health. Kale contains many vitamins like A, K and C. It promotes heart health and can help prevent cancer. Kale is a cool-season crop and may be among the first vegetables you harvest from your garden.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 1.97 mb
Pages: 4



HO-126

Consumer Horticulture Benefits for Businesses, Workplaces, and Employees

9/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham

Consumer Horticulture is the cultivation, use, and enjoyment of plants, gardens, landscapes and related horticultural items to the bene?t of individuals, communities, and the environment. These activities rely on the understanding and application of the art and science of horticulture. Consumer horticulture doesn't just impact our lives in terms of our homes, families, and communities. It also intersects with business and industry both in terms of the overall economy as well as the workplace environment that can improve the economic bottom line as well as the health and well-being of employees. In this publication we will focus on ways plants enhance the attractiveness of businesses and how their placement in the workplace may increase the productivity and wellbeing of employees.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 2.36 mb
Pages: 5



NEP-222

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Summer Squash

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Summer squash is a low-growing, bush-type squash. Examples are yellow (straight and crookneck), scalloped, and zucchini. They are fast growing and well-liked garden crops.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 1.96 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-223

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Collards

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Collards (or collard greens) are quick and easy to grow. They can be planted in early spring and can withstand frosty weather. They can also be planted later in the summer to mature in the fall after weather becomes cooler.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 3.21 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-224

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Tomatoes

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Tomatoes are a popular summer crop that many consider to be a basic part of the home garden. However, growing tomatoes can require more labor compared to other vegetables, but the results can be very rewarding.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 3.53 mb
Pages: 6



NEP-219s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Preparando Su Huerto

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Una buena tierra es la base para un huerto saludable. La tierra suministra nutrientes a las plantas para el crecimiento y el apoyo para las raices. Una buena tierra ayuda a producir verduras saludables.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.50 mb
Pages: 8



NEP-220s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Los Ejotes

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Los ejotes son faciles de sembrar y rapidos de producir cuando se recogen mientras todavia estan verdes o inmaduro. Ellos son aun mas nutritivos cuando se les permite madurar ligeramente para producir frijoles verdes "shelly beans".

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.25 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-221s

Cosechando Lo Suyo: Un Manual para Principiantes de Huertos Urbanos: Los Pimientos

6/25/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Rachel Rudolph

Los pimientos son relativamente faciles de cultivar y pueden proporcionar una cosecha consistente durante todo el verano. Puede comerlos crudos o cocidos para agregar sabor a muchos alimentos.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.62 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-219

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Preparing Your Garden

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

This publication provides easy to follow advice on how to start and maintain your garden. For specific fruit and vegetable guides, refer to the NEP "Grow your own" series.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 7



NEP-220

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Green Beans

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Green beans are easy to grow and fairly quick to produce when picked while still green or immature. They are even more nutritious when allowed to slightly mature to produce "shelly" beans. Pole beans in the garden are often popular with children since the bean vines on their supports create great hiding places.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-221

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Peppers

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Peppers are generally easy to grow and provide good summer crops that you can eat raw or cooked to add flavor to many foods. There are many different types of peppers, which are set apart by their shape or spiciness (heat), and most will grow well in Kentucky. Many heirloom, or vintage, varieties exist as well.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Size: 2.65 mb
Pages: 4



HENV-402

Water Quality and Nutrient Management at Home

7/2/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Gregg Munshaw, Suzette Walling

Fertilizers and other lawn amendments benefit the residential landscape by providing or supplementing the essential nutrients for plant growth and maintenance. Commercial fertilizers are commonly formulated based on three major nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and each plays an important role in plant development. However, improper application of fertilizers and amendments may increase the risk of non-point source pollution of surface and ground waters.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 381 kb
Pages: 4



ID-248

Gardening in Small Spaces

1/24/2018 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Ashley Osborne

Although most would agree that gardening is a worthwhile endeavor, traditional gardening with long neat rows spaced 3 or 4 feet apart to allow cultivation by a tractor or tiller may not be feasible for everyone. Individuals that live in urban areas, especially those living in townhomes, condominiums, and apartments may not have the outdoor space needed for this conventional style of gardening. In addition, those with limited mobility may not be able to establish and maintain this type of garden. For many, raised bed gardening and container gardening may be a more practical and manageable choice for those gardening in small spaces and those with limited mobility.

Departments: Ag Programs, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 1.14 mb
Pages: 8



HO-118

A Beginners Guide to Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky: Plans and Preparations

10/2/2017 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Ken Hunter, Bethany Pratt, John Strang

Begin by thinking about vegetables you and your family like to eat. Then think about what you want to grow. Some vegetables will grow better in Kentucky than others because of the average daily temperatures and amount of rainfall. It is also important to learn about the needs of each vegetable variety you are thinking about planting in your garden. Does it grow better in sun or shade? How much water does it need? What type of soil does it grow best in? Is it a cool season crop or a warm season crop?

Departments: County Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Jefferson County
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 7



ID-244

Landscape Site Assessment

9/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

The most common reason trees and shrubs fail to perform as anticipated is that their cultural requirements differ from the site characteristics. People often plant things they know and love from a distant state, purchase because they are on sale, or find attractive but don't understand the environmental requirements. In some cases, a site can be easily modified to make it more suitable for a desired species. Most of the time, it is difficult or impossible to change the site characteristics enough for the plant to thrive. Appropriate watering is essential for establishment of recently transplanted trees and shrubs. This becomes even more important (and challenging) for plants poorly matched to their sites. Selecting plant species that will thrive under particular site conditions is an easier and less expensive option. The first step in doing this is to understand the site where you plan to plant.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 125 kb
Pages: 4



HO-113

Planting Bareroot Trees and Shrubs in Your Landscape

9/14/2016 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

Many landscape plants can be installed as bareroot specimens. This method, along with balled and burlapped (B&B) and container grown plants, one of the three major ways we transplant trees and shrubs from nurseries to our landscapes. The keys to quick establishment and decades of satisfaction are following proven techniques in installation and providing proper care after transplanting.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.44 mb
Pages: 4



HO-114

Planting Container-Grown Trees and Shrubs in Your Landscape

9/14/2016 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Dewayne Ingram

Many landscape plants are installed as container-grown (containerized) specimens. These, along with balled and burlapped (B&B) and bareroot, are the three major ways we transplant trees and shrubs from nurseries to our landscapes. The keys to quick establishment and decades of satisfaction are following proven techniques in installation and providing proper care after transplanting.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 1.55 mb
Pages: 4



ID-237

Soil Percolation: A Key to Survival of Landscape Plants

9/14/2016 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

Eighty to 90 percent of disease and insect problems on landscape plants can be traced back to soil problems. Plants must be adapted to the site if they are to meet our expectations of growing, remain healthy, and attractive.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 3.29 mb
Pages: 4



PR-641

2011 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

8/30/2016 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, John Obrycki, Dan Potter, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Richard Warner, Tim Woods

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 7.64 mb
Pages: 32



HENV-205

Residential Rain Garden: Design, Construction, Maintenance

5/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee, Brad Lee, Ashley Osborne

This publication covers the design, construction, and maintenance of residential ran gardens. Rain gardens are one of several stormwater management practices that homeowners can use to reduce their property's negative impact on water quality and flooding.

Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 6.00 mb
Pages: 15



ID-21

Disease and Insect Control Program for Home Grown Fruit in Kentucky

4/29/2014 (reprinted)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Rick Durham, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Many homeowners in Kentucky grow a variety of fruits in their garden and are rewarded for their effort. One distinct advantage homeowners have over commercial orchardists is the diverse ecosystem of the home landscape (vegetable gardens, flower and fruit plantings intermixed with turf and landscape plants). Diversity often reduces the spread of insect and disease organisms and tends to keep their populations at lower, more manageable levels.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 20



ID-52

What's Wrong with My Taxus?

6/5/2013 (major revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Cheryl Kaiser, Lee Townsend, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Taxus (yew) is an evergreen shrub commonly found in Kentucky landscapes. Numerous conditions can cause these shrubs to exhibit yellowing and browning symptoms. While diseases and insect pests can result in damage, Taxus troubles are often the result of adverse growing conditions. Pinpointing the specific cause requires a thorough examination of the affected shrub, an investigation of the surrounding area, and knowledge of possible stress factors.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 2.30 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-OR-W-17

Leaf Scorch and Winter Drying of Woody Plants

6/1/2013 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Cheryl Kaiser, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Leaf scorch symptoms can develop whenever water needed for growth and health of plant foliage is insufficient. While symptoms are often due to unfavorable environmental conditions, leaf scorch can also result from an infectious disease. Symptoms, possible causes, and management of leaf scorch are discussed below.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Size: 681 kb
Pages: 4



ID-133

Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens, 2013

5/6/2013 (major revision)
Authors: Tim Coolong, Rick Durham, Terry Jones, Kenny Seebold, John Strang, Shawn Wright

Gardening makes sense! Growing your own vegetables makes you feel self-sufficient and provides fresh, healthful food. Your surplus crop can be frozen, canned, or stored in cool, dry locations. To assure gardening success, start by selecting suitable vegetable cultivars. Planting resistant or tolerant varieties is one of the most effective ways for the home gardener to avoid destructive vegetable diseases.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 425 kb
Pages: 8



HENV-508

Landscaping Septic Systems with Native Plants

2/15/2013 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Brad Lee

Septic system components sometimes have unsightly aboveground pipes, risers, ventilation systems, or large mounds. Homeowners can improve the appearance of these functional features through site design and, in particular, plant material selection.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Home and Environment (HENV series)
Size: 1.38 mb
Pages: 6



ID-118

Roses

3/27/2012 (major revision)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Rick Durham, Tim Phillips, Lee Townsend, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Roses have many landscape uses. They can be placed as accent plants or used to form hedges or ground covers. They offer a rainbow of colors and a variety of forms and fragrances, and their sizes range from miniatures to tall climbing plants. Roses may be grown under many climatic and soil conditions and, with care, thrive and produce flowers for many years.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 3.33 mb
Pages: 16



PR-602

2009 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

1/7/2010 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, John Obrycki, Dan Potter, Richard Warner, Tim Woods

The 2009 report has been organized according to our primary areas of emphasis: production and economics, pest management, and plant evaluation. These areas reflect stated industry needs, expertise available at UK, and the nature of research projects around the world that generate information applicable to Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.26 mb
Pages: 24



PR-571

2008 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

12/1/2008 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Dewayne Ingram, Dan Potter, Richard Warner, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.48 mb
Pages: 30



PR-572

2008 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/1/2008 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Tim Coolong, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, Vaden Fenton, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Wuyang Hu, Dewayne Ingram, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Paul Vincelli, Richard Warner, John Wilhoit, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 800 kb
Pages: 72



PR-554

2007 Nursery and Landscape Research Report

11/26/2007 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Chris Barton, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Dan Potter, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 48



PR-537

2006 Nursery and Landscape Report

12/15/2006 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 2.12 mb
Pages: 46



PR-538

2006 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/15/2006 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Dan Potter, Brent Rowell, Amanda Sears, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.34 mb
Pages: 82



PR-520

2005 Nursery and Landscape Report

12/30/2005 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 5.17 mb
Pages: 46



PR-521

2005 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/30/2005 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Brent Rowell, Christopher Schardl, Amanda Sears, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Paul Vincelli, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.56 mb
Pages: 98



PR-502

2004 Nursery and Landscape Report

12/20/2004 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 2.38 mb
Pages: 46



HO-65

Annual Flowers

9/15/2004 (reprinted)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Rick Durham

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Size: 67 kb
Pages: 10



PR-488

2003 Fruit and Vegetable Report

12/15/2003 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Gerald Brown, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Bob Houtz, Terry Jones, Joe Masabni, Bill Nesmith, Brent Rowell, John Snyder, John Strang, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, County Extension, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1 kb
Pages:



PR-486

2003 Nursery and Landscape Report

12/5/2003 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Paul Cappiello, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 474 kb
Pages: 42



PR-468

2002 Nursery and Landscape Report

1/3/2003 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Paul Cappiello, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, Terry Jones, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 1.90 mb
Pages: 42



PR-452

2001 Fruit and Vegetable Report

1/4/2002 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Ric Bessin, Gerald Brown, David Ditsch, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Terry Jones, Bill Nesmith, Brent Rowell, John Snyder, John Strang

Departments: Agricultural Economics, County Extension, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 437 kb
Pages: 60



PR-450

2001 UK Nursery and Landscape Program

12/1/2001 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Sharon Bale, Jack Buxton, Paul Cappiello, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 369 kb
Pages: 40



ID-72

Principles of Home Landscape Fertilizing

3/1/2001 (minor revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, John Hartman, A.J. Powell, Bill Thom

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 183 kb
Pages: 6



PR-437

2000 UK Nursery and Landscape Program

1/1/2001 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Paul Cappiello, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Richard Gates, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, Monte Johnson, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, Mike Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 574 kb
Pages: 38



PR-422

Nursery and Landscape Program: 1999 Research Report

12/31/1999 (new)
Authors: Sharon Bale, Paul Cappiello, Win Dunwell, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, Bob Geneve, John Hartman, Dewayne Ingram, Monte Johnson, Bob McNeil, Tim Phillips, Dan Potter, Mike Potter, A.J. Powell, Lisa Vaillancourt, Richard Warner, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Size: 689 kb
Pages: 33



ID-68

The Flowering Crabapple

10/1/1999 (minor revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, John Hartman, Bob McNeil, Dan Potter

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Size: 331 kb
Pages: 6