University of Kentucky
 

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Brian Eshenaur



PPFS-OR-W-11
Twig Blights of Juniper
6/1/2014 (new)

 UK Authors: Brian Eshenaur, John Hartman,
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Twig and branch dieback is a common sight in many juniper plantings in Kentucky. While other factors can cause these general symptoms, two fungal diseases are frequently responsible for the dieback.

web only | 2 pages | 720 words | 1 download | PDF: 600 kb



PPFS-GEN-6
Slime Mold, Lichens, and Sooty Mold Problems on Plants
8/1/2006 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Brian Eshenaur, John Hartman
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Slime molds are amoeba-like organisms which feed on bacteria and yeasts in the soil. During cloudy, humid weather these molds grow out of the soil and creep onto whatever is available. Turfgrass, weeds, strawberries, bedded flowers, and ground covers, as well as mulches, sidewalks and driveways may become covered with masses of gray, yellowish or black dusty spores.

web only | 2 pages | 583 words | 1 download | PDF: 208 kb



PPFS-GEN-2
Powdery Mildew
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Brian Eshenaur, John Hartman
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Powdery mildew may affect numerous ornamentals, fruits, vegetables, and agronomic crops. In Kentucky, mildew diseases are most commonly observed on apple, begonia, crabapple, cherry, dogwood, lilac, phlox, pin oak, rose, sycamore, tuliptree, turfgrass, zinnia, squash, pumpkin, cantaloupe, wheat and barley.

web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 240 kb



PPFS-OR-H-5
Oedema
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Brian Eshenaur, John Hartman
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Ornamental Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-H series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Odema is a non-parasitic disorder which, under the right environmental conditions, can affect a wide variety of herbaceous plants. We most frequently observe this problem on indoor plants, such as dracaena, geranium and schefflera. Oedema tends to be more of a problem in greenhouses, but it may also occur on plants grown in homes and offices. Field and garden grown crops, such as cabbage, may also be affected.

web only | 1 pages | 318 words | 1 download | PDF: 150 kb