University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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John Grove



A Comprehensive Guide to Soybean Management in Kentucky
6/7/2018 (new)

This publication provides information on soybean growth and development, principles of variety selection, and management practices to maximize soybean profitability in Kentucky. | ID-249
2,500 printed copies | 84 pages | 44,074 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 38,987 kb


A Comprehensive Guide to Wheat Management in Kentucky
2/23/2016 (reprinted)

The soft red winter wheat grown in Kentucky is the fourth most valuable cash crop in the state. Winter wheat has been an integral part of crop rotation for Kentucky farmers. Wheat is normally harvested in June in Kentucky and provides an important source of cash flow during the summer months. | ID-125
1,500 printed copies | 72 pages | 36,662 words | 22 downloads | PDF: 6,500 kb


Soybean Nutrient Management in Kentucky
4/24/2014 (new)

Soybean grows best on fertile soils. For decades, the University of Kentucky has conducted field studies to establish the relationship between soil nutrient supplies and soybean yield. Adequate soil fertility must be present so that yields are not limited. | AGR-213
web only | 5 pages | 2,814 words | 62 downloads | PDF: 1,015 kb


Tillage and Subsoiling Effects on Soil Compaction and Yield of Burley Tobacco: Plant and Soil Sciences Research Report (vol. 1, no. 2, 2012)
1/31/2013 (new)

Historically, tobacco producers have relied heavily on surface tillage to prepare fields for transplanting. This study was established to determine how soil penetrometer resistance and burley tobacco yields were influenced by surface and subsurface tillage (subsoiling) on soils with no known compaction present. |
web only | 4 pages | - | 29 downloads | PDF: 350 kb


Comparing No-Till and Tilled Wheat in Kentucky
8/26/2009 (new)

Historically, wheat planting in Kentucky has involved tillage. With conventional tillage practices, most residues from the previous crop are cut and buried prior to seeding wheat. No-till wheat planting eliminates tillage and reduces soil erosion, particularly on sloping soils, as well as reducing labor, machinery, and energy costs. | ID-177
1,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 9 downloads | PDF: 233 kb


2006 New Crop Opportunities Research Report
7/15/2006 (new)

| PR-533
web only | 72 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,359 kb


Agronomy Research Report, 2002
6/30/2002 (new)

| PR-464
1,000 printed copies | 39 pages | - | - | PDF: 322 kb


Agronomy Research Report 2000
7/10/2000 (new)

| PR-432
2,500 printed copies | 55 pages | - | 3 downloads | PDF: 550 kb


No-Till Small Grain Production in Kentucky
5/1/2000 (new)

| ID-136
5,000 printed copies | 11 pages | - | 20 downloads | PDF: 467 kb


1998 Agronomy Research Report
7/1/1998 (new)

| PR-402
1,500 printed copies | 56 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 403 kb


Kentucky Winter Wheat Calendar
9/1/1997 (reprinted)

| ID-125A
2,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 13 downloads | PDF: 117 kb