University of Kentucky
 

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Spencer Guinn



ID-167
On-Farm Disposal of Animal Mortalities
5/6/2013 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Spencer Guinn, Amanda A. Gumbert,
 Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineer
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags: nutrition and health

Animal mortalities are an expected part of animal production. Depending on the scale of the animal enterprise, animal mortalities can overwhelm the producer with a large number and mass of dead animals. This publication provides guidance to the producer for handling animal mortalities in accordance with Kentucky law.

web only | 4 pages | 1,382 words | 73 downloads | PDF: 1,300 kb



ID-176
Using Soil Cement on Horse and Livestock Farms
8/3/2009 (new)

 UK Authors: Spencer Guinn, Steve Higgins,
 Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags: horses, soil and land

Most farmers in Kentucky can identify with a myriad of problems associated with mud forming around high traffic areas, including areas around horse and cattle waterers, feed bunks, round bale feeders, walk paths and gate entrances. Mud is usually a result of animals congregating in and around these areas, but increased traffic can enhance the problem. In many cases, finding solutions to mud problems on farms is not the issue--the issue is determining how to make solutions economical.

web only | 4 pages | - | 60 downloads | PDF: 329 kb



ID-174
Options for Controlling Canada Geese
1/15/2009 (new)

 UK Authors: Spencer Guinn, Amanda A. Gumbert,
 Departments: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineer
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags:

The average Canada goose produces more fecal waste than a dairy cow on a per-weight basis. In addition, gaggles of resident Canada geese have been associated with problems of over grazing. Having large amounts of fecal waste around a riparian area that has limited vegetation can lead to the runoff of nutrients, sediment, and pathogens, which can contaminate ponds, lakes, and streams in Kentucky.

200 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 25 downloads | PDF: 140 kb