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Jann Knappage


NEP-225

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Broccoli

9/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Broccoli is a cool-season plant in the same family as cabbage and cauliflower. It, and others in the same family, is known as a cole crop. Broccoli can be grown in both the fall and the spring and can be eaten many ways.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.38 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-226

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Kale

9/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

In recent years, kale has been a "super food" because of the ways it can benefit our health. Kale contains many vitamins like A, K and C. It promotes heart health and can help prevent cancer. Kale is a cool-season crop and may be among the first vegetables you harvest from your garden.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 1.97 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-222

Growing Your Own: Summer Squash

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Summer squash is a low-growing, bush-type squash. Examples are yellow (straight and crookneck), scalloped, and zucchini. They are fast growing and well-liked garden crops.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 1.96 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-223

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Collards

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Collards (or collard greens) are quick and easy to grow. They can be planted in early spring and can withstand frosty weather. They can also be planted later in the summer to mature in the fall after weather becomes cooler.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 3.21 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-224

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Tomatoes

8/19/2020 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Tomatoes are a popular summer crop that many consider to be a basic part of the home garden. However, growing tomatoes can require more labor compared to other vegetables, but the results can be very rewarding.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 3.53 mb
Pages: 6



NEP-219

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Preparing Your Garden

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

This publication provides easy to follow advice on how to start and maintain your garden. For specific fruit and vegetable guides, refer to the NEP "Grow your own" series.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 7



NEP-220

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Green Beans

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Green beans are easy to grow and fairly quick to produce when picked while still green or immature. They are even more nutritious when allowed to slightly mature to produce "shelly" beans. Pole beans in the garden are often popular with children since the bean vines on their supports create great hiding places.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: garden and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.20 mb
Pages: 4



NEP-221

Growing Your Own Vegetables: Peppers

8/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Rick Durham, Jann Knappage, Rachel Rudolph, Katie Shoultz

Peppers are generally easy to grow and provide good summer crops that you can eat raw or cooked to add flavor to many foods. There are many different types of peppers, which are set apart by their shape or spiciness (heat), and most will grow well in Kentucky. Many heirloom, or vintage, varieties exist as well.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Nutrition Education Program (NEP series)
Tags: nursery and landscape, vegetables
Size: 2.65 mb
Pages: 4