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Carrie Knott


AGR-253

Identifying Freeze Damage in Wheat

8/11/2020 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott

Wheat and other small grains can be damaged when air temperatures fall below certain thresholds for two or more continuous hours. These temperatures do not necessarily mean that damage will occur. Rather, these temperatures are general guidelines of when damage may occur. It is important that the crop be scouted to determine the extent of the damage, if any.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, small grains
Size: 4.50 mb
Pages: 4



AGR-18

Grain, Forage, and Cover Crop Guide

7/8/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Erin Haramoto, Jimmy Henning, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Ray Smith

A quick resource on agronomic management of grain, forage, and cover crops.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 506 kb
Pages: 12



AGR-18P

Grain, Forage, and Cover Crop Guide (poster)

7/7/2020 (major revision)
Authors: Erin Haramoto, Jimmy Henning, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Ray Smith

A quick resource on agronomic management of grain, forage, and cover crops. NOTE: This poster is 25 x 38 inches. AGR-18 is the booklet-sized version.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 277 kb
Pages: 1



PR-777

2019 Soybean Yield and Quality Contest

6/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Matt Adams, Danny Adams, Matt Futrell, Clint Hardy, Curt Judy, Carrie Knott, Leann Martin, Tyler Miller, Michelle Simon, Darrell Simpson, Mike Smith

In Kentucky, farmers grow soybeans in two common soybean production systems: full season and double crop. Farmers plant full season soybeans in the spring and harvest them that fall, so they have harvested one crop in one calendar year. Farmers plant double crop soybeans after wheat harvest in June. These soybeans are harvested later that fall, making them the second crop harvested in the same calendar year. Both systems are important to the overall production of soybean in Kentucky. Identifying management practices that maximize yield of each system is a vital step in identifying the most profitable management systems for Kentucky. Therefore, in 1980, an annual soybean yield contest was initiated in Kentucky to document the agronomic practices utilized by producers.

Departments: Boone County, Christian County, Daviess County, Hardin County, Henderson County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Muhlenberg County, Plant and Soil Sciences, Todd County, Wayne County
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, soybeans
Size: 985 kb
Pages: 12



ID-249

A Comprehensive Guide to Soybean Management in Kentucky

6/7/2018 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Carl Bradley, J.D. Green, John Grove, Greg Halich, Erin Haramoto, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Travis Legleiter, Josh McGrath, Sam McNeill, Javier Reyes, Edwin Ritchey, Montse Salmeron, Jordan Shockley, Claire Venard, Raul Villanueva, Ole Wendroth, Kiersten Wise, Xi Zhang

This publication provides information on soybean growth and development, principles of variety selection, and management practices to maximize soybean profitability in Kentucky.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, soybeans
Size: 38.99 mb
Pages: 84



AGR-130

Soybean Production in Kentucky

3/22/2017 (major revision)
Authors: Carrie Knott, Chad Lee

Soybean seed quality is very important for crop establishment. In general, seed quality is an indicator of a seed's ability to produce a seedling in field conditions and includes both seed germination and seed vigor. Most producers are familiar with seed germination since they have seen it on a seed tag. Fewer are familiar with seed vigor.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 6



AGR-227

Identifying Canola Growth Stages

2/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott

To effectively manage canola in Kentucky, the ability to identify key developmental growth stages is important. The most common canola growth stage system describes developmental stages. Several canola growth stages are important for Kentucky producers to recognize for optimal crop management and to maximize grain yield and profitability.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, oil crops
Size: 7.33 mb
Pages: 8



AGR-223

Identifying Soybean Growth Stages

9/30/2016 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott, Chad Lee

Accurate identification of soybean growth stages is important to maximize grain yield and profitability, because most management decisions are based upon the growth stage of soybean plants within the fields. Key features of soybean growth stages are highlighted within this guide.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, soybeans
Size: 4.82 mb
Pages: 8



AGR-224

Identifying Wheat Growth Stages

9/30/2016 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott

Identifying growth stages of any crop is important to enable timely crop management decisions that maximize yields and profitability. There are several wheat growth stages that are important for Kentucky producers to recognize for optimal crop management and to maximize grain yield and profitability.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, small grains
Size: 5.27 mb
Pages: 8



ID-234

Grain Sorghum (Milo) Production in Kentucky

2/8/2016 (new)
Authors: Carl Bradley, Doug Johnson, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Jim Martin, Sam McNeill, Edwin Ritchey

Grain sorghum can be used for a variety of purposes including animal feed, unleavened breads, cakes, wallboard, starch, dextrose, brooms, ethanol, high quality wax, and alcoholic beverages. Grain sorghum produced in Kentucky is most commonly used for animal feed and was first grown here in the 1920s. Although acreage in Kentucky has fluctuated considerably over the years, yields have generally exceeded the national average since the 1970s, indicating that grain sorghum is an option for producers interested in diversifying grain crop operations.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, small grains
Size: 1.80 mb
Pages: 8



PPFS-AG-R-1

Winter Decline Syndrome of Canola

9/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Don Hershman, Carrie Knott

Interest in producing canola in Kentucky has greatly increased in recent years. Many farming operations wish to diversify their production systems with different row crops that require little to no additional equipment or infrastructure costs; canola is such a crop. Additionally, newer canola cultivars have improved agronomic traits, including winter hardiness. Lastly, more stable markets in Kentucky have greatly increased the profitability of canola.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Canola Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-R series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 600 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-213

Soybean Nutrient Management in Kentucky

4/24/2014 (new)
Authors: John Grove, Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soybean grows best on fertile soils. For decades, the University of Kentucky has conducted field studies to establish the relationship between soil nutrient supplies and soybean yield. Adequate soil fertility must be present so that yields are not limited.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, nutrient management, production practices, soybeans
Size: 1.02 mb
Pages: 5



AGR-129

Soybean Variety Selection

3/20/2014 (major revision)
Authors: Carrie Knott, Chad Lee, Edwin Ritchey

Soybean variety selection is one of the most important and most difficult management decisions a producer must make each year. It takes careful identification of the problems and needs of the production system. When done properly it increases the chance the variety will reach its full yield potential while eliminating costs for unnecessary traits, resulting in highly profitable returns.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, soybeans
Size: 570 kb
Pages: 6



PR-533

2006 New Crop Opportunities Research Report

7/15/2006 (new)
Authors: Bob Anderson, Doug Archbold, Sharon Bale, Steve Berberich, Morris Bitzer, Bill Bruening, Ron Curd, Carl Dillon, Win Dunwell, Dennis Egli, Matthew Ernst, Cindy Finneseth, Amy Fulcher, Bob Geneve, Larry Grabau, John Grove, John Hartman, Ken Haynes, Bob Houtz, June Johnston, Terry Jones, Carrie Knott, Eugene Lacefield, Chad Lee, Joe Masabni, Bob McNeil, Sam McNeill, Michael Montross, Bill Pearce, Todd Pfeiffer, Amy Poston, Dan Potter, Brent Rowell, Amanda Sears, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang, Dave Van Sanford, Mark Williams, Dwight Wolfe, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology, Regulatory Services
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.36 mb
Pages: 72



PR-517

2005 Small Grain Variety Performance Tests

8/1/2005 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, John Connelly, Carrie Knott, Sandy Swanson, Charles Tutt, Dave Van Sanford

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, research, small grains, variety trials
Size: 1.06 mb
Pages: 20