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Jeff Lehmkuhler


ASC-244

Feeding Distillery Stillage to Beef Cattle

6/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler

The growth of the bourbon industry has provided an increase in distillery byproduct feedstuffs that can be utilized by cattle as a source of energy and protein. Learning the nutritional characteristics of these feedstuffs will facilitate proper feeding, allowing for improved cattle performance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 130 kb
Pages: 3



ID-258

Weaning Beef Calves

9/17/2019 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Michelle Arnold, Darrh Bullock, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Weaning is the process of separating suckling offspring from their dam. Weaning is a management procedure applied by the herd manager. Cattle are herd animals and their gregarious nature can lead to stress as a result of this separation. Managing the weaning process can aid in reducing stress for the animals and livestock managers.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 821 kb
Pages: 4



ID-188

Strategic Winter Feeding of Cattle using a Rotational Grazing Structure

7/30/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Winter feeding of cattle is a necessary part of nearly all cow-calf operations. In winter months, livestock producers often confine animals to smaller "sacrifice" pastures to reduce the area damaged from winter feeding. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have significant negative impacts on soil and water quality. Such areas include locations in floodplains, such as those along creek bottoms or around barns near streams. These locations are convenient, flat areas for setting hay ring feeders; however, their negative effects on water quality outweigh the convenience.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 737 kb
Pages: 4



ID-143

Rotational Grazing

11/21/2016 (reprinted)
Authors: Roy Burris, Bob Coleman, Jimmy Henning, Garry Lacefield, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Ray Smith

A rotational grazing program can generally be defined as use of several pastures, one of which is grazed while the others are rested before being regrazed. Continuous grazing is the use of one pasture for the entire grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 887 kb
Pages: 16



ID-224

Producer's Guide to Pasture-Based Beef Finishing

10/6/2016 (reprinted)
Authors: Greg Halich, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Lee Meyer, Gregg Rentfrow, Ray Smith

Will pasture-finished beef eventually become a commodity with lowered product prices? These and other questions must be evaluated by those considering pasture-based beef finishing. As with any new enterprise, however, the learning curve is steep, and success requires a commitment to working through the many production, marketing, and processing details. This reference guide provides a foundation for this process.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 1.51 mb
Pages: 48



ID-231

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Acute or Atypical Interstitial Pneumonia (AIP)

7/17/2015 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

In the Southeastern United States, acute interstitial pneumonia has been produced by ingestion of the leaves and seeds of perilla mint (Perilla frutescens). Perilla ketone is the toxin absorbed from the rumen into the bloodstream and carried to the lungs where it damages the lung tissue in cattle.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 507 kb
Pages: 3



ASC-215

Mineral and Protein Blocks and Tubs for Cattle

11/3/2014 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Roy Burris, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Nutritional supplement blocks and tubs are convenient for beef producers, require no investment in feeding troughs and require a limited area for storing. One of the most attractive features is that they lower the labor needed to supplement livestock. Many producers use these products to provide supplemental nutrients to cattle consuming low-quality forages or as a mechanism to promote a more consistent intake of minerals. These products are also attractive to producers who have off-farm employment as they eliminate the need for daily feeding. Yet, they often come at a greater cost per unit of nutrient than more conventional feedstuffs. Since there are differences in the blocks and tubs being marketed today, familiarity with how to compare products and determine their differences will enable producers to decide which product best fits their needs.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 159 kb
Pages: 4



ID-226

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Hypomagnesemic Tetany or "Grass Tetany"

9/18/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Magnesium is a vital component of normal nerve conduction, muscle function, and bone mineral formation. Hypomagnesemic tetany or "grass tetany" is a disorder caused by an abnormally low blood concentration of the essential mineral magnesium (Mg). Synonyms for this disorder include spring tetany, grass staggers, wheat pasture poisoning, or lactation tetany.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 121 kb
Pages: 3



ID-223

Forage-Related Cattle Disorders: Brassicas--Be Aware of the Animal Health Risks

8/12/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Although infrequent, brassica crops can cause animal health disorders if grazing is managed improperly. Most brassica-related disorders in cattle tend to occur during the first two weeks of grazing while adjusting to the forage. The primary potential disorders are polioencephalomalcia or PEM, hemolytic anemia (mainly with kale), nitrate poisoning, and pulmonary emphysema. Other possible clinical disorders include bloat and rumen acidosis, and metabolic problems such as hypomagnesemia and hypothyroidism with goiter. Glucosinates present in brassicas are precursors of irritants that can cause colic and diarrhea. Large bulbs may lodge in the esophagus and lead to choking. Certain brassicas (specifically rape) can cause sunburn or "scald" on light-skinned animals, especially when grazed while the plants are immature. Other potential problems include oxalate poisoning and off-flavoring of meat and milk.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 913 kb
Pages: 3



ID-217

Forage-Related Disorders in Cattle: Nitrate Poisoning

3/10/2014 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Cynthia Gaskill, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Ray Smith

Few plants normally contain high nitrate levels, since under normal growing conditions the nitrates are converted to protein as quickly as they are absorbed from the roots. However, under certain conditions plants can develop dangerously high nitrate levels which can cause nitrate intoxication. Death or abortion may result. Care must be taken to recognize possible toxic forages and manage them appropriately to avoid animal loss.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 314 kb
Pages: 3



SR-105

2012 Beef Research and Extension Report

1/7/2014 (new)
Authors: Glen Aiken, Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Roy Burris, Lowell Bush, J.R. Bussard, Andrew Foote, Ben Goff, David Harmon, V.B. Holder, Isabelle Kagan, Nicole Kenney, D.H. Kim, S.E. Kitts, Jim Klotz, Anne Koontz, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Kyle McLeod, Jim Strickland, Eric Vanzant, Bill Witt

The intent of this report is to provide highlights of our research and extension activities. We have a vested interest in the beef industry in the state and nation, and hope this report provides a window into our programs. We believe that after viewing this report, a greater appreciation will be garnered with respect to our involvement in the multiple fields of study related to beef production. The faculty, staff and student activities are advancing our understanding of basic science principles of livestock production as well as applied research that producers and the industry can benefit from immediately, as well as in the future. Extension educational programs, on-farm demonstrations, and other activities aid in transferring this knowledge to producers, allowing for increased awareness and adoption of management change.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, USDA-ARS
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags:
Size: 975 kb
Pages: 40



ID-202

Feedlot Design and Environmental Management for Backgrounding and Stocker Operations

3/21/2013 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Kentucky's cattle industry represents the largest beef cattle herd east of the Mississippi, ranking eighth in the nation for number of beef cows. This industry is extremely important to Kentucky's economy. This publication discusses site evaluation strategies, production area management techniques, and a variety of facility types for intensive cattle production that preserve natural resources and improve production.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 3.80 mb
Pages: 12



ID-205

Drought-Stressed Corn Silage Valuation, 2012

2/6/2013 (new)
Authors: Kenny Burdine, Greg Halich, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Cory Walters

Extended dry conditions have impacted the corn crop severely in many areas of the state this year. As the condition of the corn crop deteriorates, many have been forced to look at salvage options such as cutting corn for silage and possibly hay for some fields. Due to the extreme weather conditions this year, this publication will focus on valuing drought-stressed corn silage.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops
Size: 445 kb
Pages: 6



ID-135

Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis ("Pinkeye") in Cattle

9/24/2012 (major revision)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, John Johns, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Patty Scharko

Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK), also known as pinkeye, is a costly disease for the beef producer. Tremendous losses stem from poor weight gain and loss of appetite in affected animals suffering from visual impairment and ocular pain.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 325 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-186

Distillers Grain Coproducts for Beef Cattle

12/5/2011 (new)
Authors: Roy Burris, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Feeding distillers grains derived from the production of spirits or ethanol for fuel is an acceptable practice for beef cattle production. The use of these products as both an energy and a protein supplement has been beneficial as the cereal grain prices have increased making these coproducts more cost competitive.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, nutrition and health, small grains
Size: 231 kb
Pages: 4



SR-104

2010 Research and Extension Beef Report

3/11/2011 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Roy Burris, Lowell Bush, Blair Knight, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Jim Matthews, Kyle McLeod, Lori Porter, Jim Randolph, Gregg Rentfrow, Keith Schillo, Meg Steinman, Jim Strickland, Laurentia van Rensburg, Eric Vanzant

The 2010 Research and Extension Beef Report highlights advances in understanding of basic scientific principles of livestock production as well as applied research from which producers and the industry can benefit. Extension educational programs, on-farm demonstrations, and other activities help transfer this knowledge to producers so they can adopt of management changes as appropriate.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, UK Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, USDA-ARS
Series: Special Report (SR series)
Tags:
Size: 2.10 mb
Pages: 89



ID-186

Managing Legume Induced Bloat in Cattle

3/10/2011 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold, Roy Burris, David Ditsch, Garry Lacefield, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Ruminal tympany, or bloat, can result in lost animal performance and in severe cases, death. It occurs as a result of a buildup of fermentation gases in the rumen. Bloat may be categorized as frothy bloat, which is caused by the formation of a stable foam in the rumen, or free gas bloat, which is due to excessive production of gaseous compounds from fermentation or as a result of an obstruction preventing the escape of gas compounds. Legume bloat is a frothy bloat condition.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: nutrition and health
Size: 400 kb
Pages: 4



ASC-25

Growth Promoting Implants for Beef Cattle

3/24/2010 (major revision)
Authors: Roy Burris, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Utilization of growth-promoting implants in the beef cattle industry provides an opportunity for improving production efficiency. Within the animal, they promote protein synthesis, resulting in a 10 to 30% increase in growth along with a 5 to 10% improvement in feed efficiency.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags:
Size: 225 kb
Pages: 4