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Kimberly Leonberger



ID-194
Diagnosing Plant Problems: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 7
8/22/2019 (major revision)

 UK Authors: Jessica Bessin, Rick Durham,
 Departments: Barren County, Bell County, Entomology,
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags:

For those with a green thumb, growing plants may seem easy. However, when plant problems arise, determining the cause of these issues can be difficult. Developing the skills necessary to determine the cause of a plant problem takes experience and time. The steps involved in the diagnostic process first require analysis of information regarding the history of the symptomatic plant and the surrounding area. Plant symptoms and signs provide additional evidence to aid in determination of a possible cause.

web only | 28 pages | 9,487 words | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb



PPFS-FR-T-26
Cultural Calendar for Commercial Peach Production
8/1/2019 (new)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources,
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant disease

Integrated pest management (IPM) includes the combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical tools in efforts to manage diseases and pests while minimizing risks associated with pesticides. Cultural practices are an integral part of an IPM program and should be incorporated into all commercial systems whether large or small, conventional or organic. This publication provides recommended practices at approximate growth stages and/or production periods. However, these timelines are approximate and may require adjustment for particular conditions. Growers who encounter situations that may not align with suggestions here should contact their county Extension office for assistance. Extension offices can also provide updated pest management recommendations. This cultural guide serves as a supplement to published spray guides and scouting guides.

web only | 7 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,385 kb



PPFS-FR-T-25
Cultural Calendar for Commercial Apple Production
8/1/2019 (new)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources,
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant disease

egrated pest management (IPM) includes the combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical tools in efforts to manage diseases and pests while minimizing risks associated with pesticides. Cultural practices are an integral part of an IPM program and should be incorporated into all commercial systems whether large or small, conventional or organic. This publication provides recommended practices at approximate growth stages and/or production periods. However, these timelines are approximate and may require adjustment for particular conditions. Growers who encounter situations that may not align with suggestions here should contact their county Extension office for assistance. Extension offices can also provide updated pest management recommendations. This cultural guide serves as a supplement to published spray guides and scouting guides.

web only | 7 pages | - | - | PDF: 986 kb



PPFS-FR-T-24
Bitter Rot of Apple
8/1/2019 (new)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Madison McCulloch,
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: fruits, nursery and landscape, plant disease

Bitter rot is the most common fruit rot of apple in Kentucky. Trees in both commercial and residential plantings can suffer devastating losses. Growers consider bitter rot the most important fruit rot and the second most destructive disease in Kentucky apple orchards. Yield losses can range from 10% to 100%.

web only | 6 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,492 kb



PPFS-FR-S-25
Backyard Berry Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar
7/1/2019 (reviewed)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
 Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic produ

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

web only | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,037 kb



PPFS-FR-S-24
Backyard Grape Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar
7/1/2019 (reviewed)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
 Series: Small Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-S series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic produ

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

web only | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,213 kb



PPFS-FR-T-22
Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar
7/1/2019 (reviewed)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic produ

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

web only | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 890 kb



PPFS-FR-T-21
Backyard Apple and Pear Disease, Pest, and Cultural Practices Calendar
7/1/2019 (reviewed)

 UK Authors: Ric Bessin, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, organic produ

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule.

web only | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,013 kb



PPFS-GEN-15
Considerations for Diagnosis of Ornamentals in the Landscape
7/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Amy Aldenderfer, Adam Leonberger,
 Departments: County Extension, Franklin County, Hardin
 Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Diagnosing plant problems can be challenging. A site visit can provide the information necessary for a complete and accurate diagnosis. However, once on-site, it is important to know how to proceed. The following guidelines are intended to assist in the process of gathering pertinent information and determining a possible cause. Often abiotic conditions such as environment, mechanical damage, or living organisms like insects or wildlife may be to blame. Should the field site diagnosis be inconclusive and samples need to be submitted to the UK Plant Diagnostic Laboratories, the information gathered here can provide valuable supplementary information.

web only | 6 pages | - | - | PDF: 3,377 kb



PPFS-VG-23
Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden
4/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden.

web only | 2 pages | - | - | PDF: 788 kb



PPFS-VG-22
Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden
4/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein.

web only | 2 pages | - | - | PDF: 460 kb



PPFS-VG-21
Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden
4/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases.

web only | 2 pages | - | - | PDF: 874 kb



PPFS-VG-20
Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden
4/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants.

web only | 2 pages | - | - | PDF: 896 kb



PPFS-VG-19
Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden
4/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Emily Pfeufer
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
 Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen.

web only | 2 pages | - | - | PDF: 995 kb



PPFS-OR-W-27
Canker Sampling of Trees and Woody Ornamentals
3/1/2019 (new)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Nicole Ward Gauthier
 Departments: Plant Pathology
 Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Cankers on woody plants can result in dieback, decline, structural failure, or plant death. Cankers form when plant pathogens enter woody tissues. Plants stressed by poor planting practices, improper maintenance, extreme weather, insect damage, mechanical damage, or other wounds are at increased risk for infection by canker causing pathogens.

web only | 5 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,600 kb



PPFS-FR-T-7
Plant Diseases of Fruit Prediction Models for Kentucky Counties
1/1/2019 (minor revision)

 UK Authors: Kimberly Leonberger, Evan Tate,
 Departments: Hancock County, Plant Pathology
 Series: Tree Fruit Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-FR-T series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Numerous plant diseases impact fruit crops throughout Kentucky. Factors such as plant growth stage, as well as rainfall, temperature, and other weather conditions, can be used to determine risk for plant disease. Prediction models are critical tools for growers, as they allow for protective management strategies to be deployed when disease risk is high. Use of these models can provide growers with cost savings, as unnecessary chemical applications are eliminated when risk of infection is low.

web only | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,586 kb



PPA-46
Plant Diseases: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 6
3/2/2016 (major revision)

 UK Authors: Kelly Jackson, Kimberly Leonberger,
 Departments: County Extension, Plant Pathology
 Series: Plant Pathology (PPA series)
 Tags: plant diseases

Anyone who has ever planted a garden knows not only the rewards of beautiful flowers, fruit, and/or vegetables, but also the disappointment when plants become diseased or damaged. Many factors cause plants to exhibit poor vigor, changes in appearance, or even death. This chapter focuses on those living organisms that cause disease: fungi, water molds, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, phytoplasmas, and parasitic plants.

web only | 24 pages | 5,749 words | 45 downloads | PDF: 5,000 kb