University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Edwin Ritchey



Grain Sorghum (Milo) Production in Kentucky
2/8/2016 (new)

Grain sorghum can be used for a variety of purposes including animal feed, unleavened breads, cakes, wallboard, starch, dextrose, brooms, ethanol, high quality wax, and alcoholic beverages. Grain sorghum produced in Kentucky is most commonly used for animal feed and was first grown here in the 1920s. Although acreage in Kentucky has fluctuated considerably over the years, yields have generally exceeded the national average since the 1970s, indicating that grain sorghum is an option for producers interested in diversifying grain crop operations. | ID-234
web only | 8 pages | 5,390 words | 31 downloads | PDF: 1,800 kb


Agricultural Lime Recommendations Based on Lime Quality
1/13/2016 (major revision)

Soil acidity is one of the most important soil factors affecting crop growth and ultimately, yield and profitability. It is determined by measuring the soil pH, which is a measure of the amount of hydrogen ions in the soil solution. As soil acidity increases, the soil pH decreases. Soils tend to be naturally acidic in areas where rainfall is sufficient to cause substantial leaching of basic ions (such as calcium and magnesium), which are replaced by hydrogen ions. Most soils in Kentucky are naturally acidic because of our abundant rainfall. | ID-163
web only | 6 pages | 2,749 words | 73 downloads | PDF: 485 kb


Land Judging Score Card
3/31/2015 (major revision)

Score sheet for the 4-H publication "Land Judging in Kentucky." | 4BA-09SE
web only | 2 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 149 kb


4-H Land Judging in Kentucky
3/30/2015 (major revision)

Land judging is a way of appraising the physical nature and capability of soils. Certain soil properties, such as slope, depth and color, and others that can be seen, felt or measured, are reliable indicators of soil characteristics. This publication provides instruction on basic soil concepts that can be easily applied to agricultural, industrial, residential, and recreational land uses in Kentucky. It provides characteristics to be judged as well as a good working knowledge of soil. | 4BA-08MH
web only | 19 pages | 5,578 words | 50 downloads | PDF: 7,100 kb


Determining Soil Texture by Feel
1/22/2015 (new)

Soil texture refers to the proportion of sand, silt, and clay in a soil. Texture influences almost every aspect of soil use, both in agricultural and engineering applications, and even how natural ecosystems function. Many scientists consider soil texture the most important soil property as it can influence soil/water relationships, gas exchange, and plant nutrition. Accurately determining soil texture in a lab requires time and money; therefore, it is often necessary to estimate soil texture in the field by feel, which can be very accurate if done correctly. | AGR-217
web only | 3 pages | 1,049 words | 48 downloads | PDF: 250 kb


Organic Corn Production in Kentucky
1/15/2015 (new)

The number of organic dairy cows in Kentucky has been steadily increasing for years, yet there's not enough organic corn produced in the state to feed the growing herds. In short, a new market has developed in the state, but few local farmers are taking advantage of it. While Kentucky farmers are no strangers to corn, growing corn organically utilizes different management, cultural and marketing practices and requires new skills. And, importantly, organic production must follow an approved farm plan that allows farmers to sell their corn as certified organic. This publication is designed to be both an introduction to a new enterprise as well as a practical manual for those interested in pursuing organic corn production on their own farms. | ID-225
2,000 printed copies | 30 pages | 19,856 words | 47 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Evaluating Land Resource Potentials in Kentucky
8/15/2014 (new)

The most successful land use decisions are those where the intended use matches the capabilities of the land. Determining the capability of the land begins with a visual assessment of the landscape such as topography (percent slope) and surface drainage patterns followed by a closer examination of the soil physical and chemical characteristics. The purpose of this publication is to provide a basic understanding of the relationship between these landscape and soil properties to facilitate wise land use decisions. | AGR-215
web only | 3 pages | 3,493 words | 39 downloads | PDF: 630 kb


Liming Kentucky Lawns
7/22/2014 (new)

Most homeowners desire an aesthetically pleasing landscape and will take steps to ensure success. Proper fertilizing, watering, and pest control are all steps that will lead to a quality lawn. However, some confusion surrounds when and why lime should be applied to a lawn. Many homeowners believe that lime needs to be applied on an annual basis for a quality lawn. The purpose of this publication is to explain why lime is needed and whether it is required on your lawn. | AGR-214
web only | 4 pages | 1,758 words | 80 downloads | PDF: 909 kb


Lime and Fertilizer Recommendations, 2014-2015
5/28/2014 (major revision)

Recommended nutrient additions, based on a soil test, are only made when a crop yield or economic response has been measured for that crop under Kentucky soil-climatic conditions. Many field studies have been conducted by the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station under Kentucky farm conditions to determine the extent of any primary, secondary, or micronutrient needs. Yield and soil test data from these studies serve as guidelines for establishing recommendations contained in this publication. Recommendations in this publication strive to supply the plant nutrients needed to achieve maximum economic return assuming good management practices. | AGR-1
2,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 11,331 words | 145 downloads | PDF: 1,300 kb


Soybean Nutrient Management in Kentucky
4/24/2014 (new)

Soybean grows best on fertile soils. For decades, the University of Kentucky has conducted field studies to establish the relationship between soil nutrient supplies and soybean yield. Adequate soil fertility must be present so that yields are not limited. | AGR-213
web only | 5 pages | 2,814 words | 60 downloads | PDF: 1,015 kb


Soybean Variety Selection
3/20/2014 (major revision)

Soybean variety selection is one of the most important and most difficult management decisions a producer must make each year. It takes careful identification of the problems and needs of the production system. When done properly it increases the chance the variety will reach its full yield potential while eliminating costs for unnecessary traits, resulting in highly profitable returns. | AGR-129
1,000 printed copies | 6 pages | 3,941 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 570 kb


Fertilizer Management in Alfalfa
1/8/2014 (new)

Alfalfa is a high quality, valuable forage crop that can be successfully produced on most well-drained soils in Kentucky for hay, silage, and grazing. Fertilizing alfalfa can be uniquely challenging because it is a high-yielding crop that removes a tremendous amount of soil nutrients when compared to other crops grown in Kentucky. A thorough understanding of alfalfa's growth habits, nutrient requirements, and soil nutrient supply mechanisms is necessary to effectively manage fertilizer inputs and maximize profitability while minimizing environmental impact. | AGR-210
500 printed copies | 4 pages | 2,657 words | 44 downloads | PDF: 4 kb


Iron Deficiency of Landscape Plants
10/16/2013 (major revision)

Iron deficiency is a nutritional deficit that can occur in woody and herbaceous plants in landscapes, nurseries, greenhouses, and production fields. It is most often associated with soils that have neutral or alkaline pH (pH 7.0 or above). Plants that grow best in acidic soils are particularly vulnerable to this condition. In Kentucky, iron deficiency is most commonly observed on pin oak, willow oak, azalea, rhododendron, and blueberry, but other woody plants are also susceptible. | ID-84
web only | 4 pages | 1,862 words | 38 downloads | PDF: 3,130 kb


Soils and Fertility: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 4
10/12/2011 (new)

Soil is a mixture of weathered rock fragments and organic matter at the earth's surface. It is biologically active--a home to countless microorganisms, invertebrates, and plant roots. Soil provides nutrients, water, and physical support for plants as well as air for plant roots. Soil organisms are nature's primary recyclers, turning dead cells and tissue into nutrients, energy, carbon dioxide, and water to fuel new life. | AGR-204
web only | 24 pages | 11,257 words | 58 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


Improving the Productivity of Landscapes with Little or No Topsoil
8/16/2011 (new)

Landscapes with little or no topsoil can make it difficult to produce a garden, lawn, or other plants. Topsoil, dark in color compared to the underlying soil, is the part of a soil that is most biologically active, nutrient rich, and easily managed. It also is usually more easily worked than underlying soil, supplies most of the plant's water and nutrients, and is generally best for plant growth. | AGR-203
web only | 4 pages | 2,579 words | 40 downloads | PDF: 430 kb


Agronomy Research Report 2000
7/10/2000 (new)

| PR-432
2,500 printed copies | 55 pages | - | 3 downloads | PDF: 550 kb