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Shubin Saha


CCD-CP-125

Watermelon

11/19/2018 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Shubin Saha

Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a warm-season crop in the Cucurbit family. Watermelons are grown across the state, including larger areas in Casey County, Lincoln County, Hart County, Allen County and Daviess County. Kentucky farms annually harvest more than 1,000 watermelon acres, the Commonwealth's second largest fresh market vegetable by area.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags:
Size: 1.60 mb
Pages: 4



ID-235

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky

10/17/2018 (major revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Cheryl Kaiser, John Obrycki, Emily Pfeufer, Rachel Rudolph, Shubin Saha, Shawn Wright

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: equipment and structures, farm crops, high tunnel, nursery and landscape, production practices, vegetables
Size: 1.94 mb
Pages: 28



PR-721

2016 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/13/2016 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Ric Bessin, Jessica Bessin, Ty Cato, Steve Diver, June Johnston, Dave Lowry, Patty Lucas, Sean Lynch, Shubin Saha, Alexis Sheffield, Pam Sigler, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Joseph Tucker, John Walsh, Neil Wilson, Dwight Wolfe

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collection of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry.

Departments: County Extension, Entomology, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 2.80 mb
Pages: 40



ID-233

Tomato Disease Management in Greenhouses

12/22/2015 (new)
Authors: Shubin Saha

Tomato is, by far, the most common vegetable crop grown in greenhouses in Indiana and Kentucky. This publication examines common tomato diseases of the greenhouse and provides management recommendations.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 465 kb
Pages: 6



PR-706

2015 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/21/2015 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Emily Pfeufer, Shubin Saha, John Snyder, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

The 2015 Fruit and Vegetable Crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in seven counties in Kentucky: Jefferson, Spencer, Trimble, Shelby, Caldwell, Franklin, and Fayette.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.54 mb
Pages: 44



ID-227

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Legume Vegetables in Kentucky

1/30/2015 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Shubin Saha, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Shawn Wright

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" (but rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. Proper identification is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during bean and pea production in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter a problem that is not included here. Please contact your county Extension service for assistance.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 33.00 mb
Pages: 32



PR-688

2014 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

1/7/2015 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Julie Beale, Lucas Hanks, June Johnston, Brenda Kennedy, Sara Long, Sean Lynch, Tracey Parriman, Shubin Saha, Nancy Savage, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Jeff Wheeler, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe, Shawn Wright

The 2014 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in three counties in Kentucky, including: Mason, Shelby, and Spencer.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 950 kb
Pages: 42



PR-673

2013 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

1/8/2014 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Ric Bessin, Shubin Saha, Kenny Seebold, John Snyder, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Patsy Wilson

Variety trials included in this year's publication include: cabbage, asparagus, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, apples, peaches, and grapes. Additional research trials include organic management of cucumber beetles, financial comparison of organic potato integrated pest management systems, and effect of organic fertilizer materials for production of kale.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 2.49 mb
Pages: 44