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Kenny Seebold


PPFS-VG-10

Foliar Diseases of Cucurbits

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, gourds, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the foliage of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 327 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-11-QF

Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits Quick Facts

7/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Steve Osborne, Kenny Seebold

Highlights from the publication Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits, PPFS-VG-11.

Departments: County Extension, Entomology, Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 786 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-GEN-7

Homeowner's Guide to Fungicides

4/1/2019 (minor revision)
Authors: Kenny Seebold, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Diseases in home gardens, orchards, and landscapes do not always cause total losses, but they can be serious problems if left unmanaged. As a rule, chemicals are not recommended as the only means of disease control for homeowners. Cultural practices such as sanitation, irrigation management, attention to plant health, rotation, and selection of disease-resistant varieties are usually enough to control diseases. Chemicals may be required, though, and should be used as a supplement to good management practices.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 491 kb
Pages: 5



ID-91s

Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos Cucurbitaceos en Kentucky

7/15/2015 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Cheryl Kaiser, Kenny Seebold

Esta guia cubre los problemas abioticos y bioticos mas comunes que ocurren en cucurbitaceas (Familia Curcubitaceae) en Kentucky. Este grupo de plantas, al que tambien se refiere como enredaderas trepadoras, incluye al pepino, melon (cantalope), sandia, melones especiales, calabazas (o zapallos), calabacines, y cogordas (conocidas tambien como calabazas de peregrino, ayotes, jicaras, o porongos [gourds en ingles]).

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.74 mb
Pages: 24



PR-688

2014 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

1/7/2015 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Julie Beale, Lucas Hanks, June Johnston, Brenda Kennedy, Sara Long, Sean Lynch, Tracey Parriman, Shubin Saha, Nancy Savage, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Jeff Wheeler, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe, Shawn Wright

The 2014 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in three counties in Kentucky, including: Mason, Shelby, and Spencer.

Departments: Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 950 kb
Pages: 42



PPFS-VG-18

Blackleg and Bacterial Soft Rot of Potato

10/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Blackleg and soft rot are bacterial diseases that cause heavy losses in Kentucky potato patches in some years. These diseases may result in missing hills when seed pieces are destroyed or the sprouts decay before they emerge from the ground. Serious rotting of tubers in potato hills and in storage can also occur.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 707 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-VG-17

Bacterial Spot of Pepper and Tomato

9/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Bacterial spot can result in severe damage to tomato, sweet pepper, and pimento crops. The bacterium attacks leaves, fruits, and stems causing blemishes on these plant parts. Outbreaks of leaf spotting have resulted in leaf drop and poor fruit set in the field. Defoliation due to leaf spotting can increase the incidence of sun scald on fruit. Fruit infections result in badly spotted fruit, which are of little market value. In addition, fruit injury from this disease allows entry of secondary fruit rotting organisms, causing further damage.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 636 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-VG-16

Bean Diseases

8/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Anthracnose can reduce bean quality, as well as yield. Losses can be severe during cool, rainy weather. It is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which appears on all aboveground parts of the plant but rarely on roots. Lesions generally are dark brown and may contain pink spore masses during moist weather. Elongate, angular spots appear on lower leaf veins. As the fungus spreads into surrounding tissue, lesions eventually appear on the upper side of veins. Affected seeds become discolored. Plants grown from infected seed may develop lesions on the cotyledons.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 1.15 mb
Pages: 6



ID-172s

Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos de Solanaceas on Kentucky

7/9/2014 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Kenny Seebold, John Strang

La identificacion correcta de los patogenos y de insectos plagas, asi como los trastornos nutricionales y fisiologicos e incluso derivas de herbicidas es esencial para determinar el curso apropiado de accion. Las imagenes incluidas en esta guia representan algunas plagas o problemas comunes que los agricultores pueden encontrar cuando se producen cultivos de solanaceas (tomates, pimientos, berenjena y papas) en Kentucky.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 5.60 mb
Pages: 32



ID-184

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Sweet Corn in Kentucky

6/3/2014 (reprinted)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Terry Jones, Kenny Seebold, John Strang

In terms of acreage, sweet corn is the largest commercial vegetable crop grown in Kentucky. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs have played an important role in its production and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" but not necessarily eliminated in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 1.05 mb
Pages: 16



PPFS-GEN-10

Root-knot Nematode in Commercial and Residential Crops

5/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Root-knot nematode (RKN) is a soil-dwelling microscopic roundworm. This nematode is parasitic on numerous plants, including vegetables, fruits, field crops, ornamentals, and common weeds. RKN can occur in commercial and homeowner plantings. Frequently, the nematode interacts with other plant pathogens to form a disease complex in which the resulting disease is much more severe than that caused by either component alone. Root-knot nematode is particularly serious when high populations are allowed to build up due to continuous replanting of susceptible plants on the same site.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 917 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-15

Tomato Wilt Problems

5/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Fusarium and Verticillium wilts are two fungal diseases that cause similar wilts in tomato. Fusarium wilt tends to be more common during warm weather, while Verticillium wilt is found more often when temperatures are cool. Both diseases share similar symptoms and can be hard to tell apart visually; laboratory tests are often needed for an accurate diagnosis.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 2.07 mb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-11

Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits

4/1/2014 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kenny Seebold

Bacterial wilt is a common, often destructive, disease of cucurbits. This disease can cause nearly complete losses of a planting before the first harvest. Bacterial wilt primarily affects cucumber and muskmelon (cantaloupe). While squash and pumpkin are also susceptible, the damage to these hosts is usually less severe.

Departments: Entomology, Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 575 kb
Pages: 3



PR-673

2013 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

1/8/2014 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Ric Bessin, Shubin Saha, Kenny Seebold, John Snyder, John Strang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Patsy Wilson

Variety trials included in this year's publication include: cabbage, asparagus, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, apples, peaches, and grapes. Additional research trials include organic management of cucumber beetles, financial comparison of organic potato integrated pest management systems, and effect of organic fertilizer materials for production of kale.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 2.49 mb
Pages: 44



ID-216

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cole Crops in Kentucky

7/22/2013 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Kenny Seebold

Cole crops are important as a group, particularly when all acreage of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts are combined. Spring planted crops may have very different problems associated with them compared to fall crops. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs fill an important role in production of these crops and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed," but not necessarily eliminated, in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 5.30 mb
Pages: 16



ID-133

Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens, 2013

5/6/2013 (major revision)
Authors: Tim Coolong, Rick Durham, Terry Jones, Kenny Seebold, John Strang, Shawn Wright

Gardening makes sense! Growing your own vegetables makes you feel self-sufficient and provides fresh, healthful food. Your surplus crop can be frozen, canned, or stored in cool, dry locations. To assure gardening success, start by selecting suitable vegetable cultivars. Planting resistant or tolerant varieties is one of the most effective ways for the home gardener to avoid destructive vegetable diseases.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 425 kb
Pages: 8



PPFS-GH-4

Greenhouse Sanitation

3/1/2013 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Diseases are a major concern for greenhouse growers and can be a key limitation to profitable plant production. Disease management in greenhouses is critical because the warm, humid environment in these structures provides optimal conditions for reproduction of many pathogens. When disease management is neglected, pathogen populations build-up and continue to increase as long as there is susceptible plant tissue available for infection and disease development. Infected plant tissue, infested soil, and pathogen inoculum (such as spores, bacterial cells, virus particles, nematode eggs) all serve as sources of pathogens that can later infect healthy plants.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Greenhouse Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GH series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 640 kb
Pages: 3



PR-656

2012 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/6/2012 (new)
Authors: Ben Abell, Angela Anandappa, Doug Archbold, Paul Bachi, Julie Beale, Ty Cato, Tim Coolong, June Johnston, Brenda Kennedy, Sara Long, Sean Lynch, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Zheng Wang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Jeff Wheeler, Mark Williams, Neil Wilson, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe, Tim Woods, Shang-Ho Yang

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2012 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and several demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in more than 15 counties in Kentucky. Research was conducted by faculty and staff from several departments within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture including: Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Agricultural Economics. This report also includes collaborative research projects conducted with faculty and staff at Kentucky State University.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 47



ID-88

Woody Plant Disease Control Guide for Kentucky

3/22/2012 (major revision)
Authors: Win Dunwell, Bill Fountain, Cheryl Kaiser, Kenny Seebold, Sarah Vanek, Paul Vincelli, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Management of woody plant diseases usually combines preventative and curative practices, including a focus on plant health, sanitation, cultivar selection, and pesticides.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 3.70 mb
Pages: 16



ID-195

Sweetpotato Production for Kentucky

2/21/2012 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Sarah Fannin, Kenny Seebold, Tim Woods

Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a member of the morningglory or Convolvulaceae family. Sweetpotatoes have their origins in tropical America, with early remains having been found in Panama, Peru and Mexico. A perennial plant in their native regions, they are typically killed by frost when grown in a temperate climate. Sweetpotatoes are true roots and not tubers as is the case with the Irish Potato (Solanum tuberosum). Because they are true roots they will continue to grow and enlarge as long as the plant continues to grow.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, County Extension, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, vegetables
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 16



PPFS-GEN-3

Damping-off of Vegetables and Herbaceous Ornamentals

2/1/2012 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Damping-off can occur on any herbaceous crop grown from seed, including vegetables, ornamentals, and field crops. Seeds, seedlings, and young plants may be affected, resulting in poor stands in home gardens, greenhouses, and commercial fields. Losses to damping-off can be severe, especially when cool, wet weather prevails at seeding or seed emergence.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-GEN series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 288 kb
Pages: 2



PR-626

2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/20/2011 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Paul Bachi, Julie Beale, Steve Berberich, Ric Bessin, Jessica Cole, Tim Coolong, Vaden Fenton, Lucas Hanks, John Hartman, June Johnston, Sara Long, Logan Minter, Janet Pfeiffer, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Zheng Wang, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Jeff Wheeler, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky.

Departments: Entomology, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Kentucky State University, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.39 mb
Pages: 53



PPFS-VG-12

Yellow Vine Decline of Cucurbits

8/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Kenny Seebold

Symptoms of yellow vine decline begin to appear approximately 2 weeks before fruit maturity. The disease may appear initially as stunting of plants and/or intense yellowing of foliage, followed by a slow decline in plant health. In some cases, a sudden collapse of vines may occur with no other symptoms. Vascular tissue (phloem) from crowns of affected plants is often discolored, appearing light brown rather than a healthy translucent green.

Departments: Entomology, Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 454 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-AG-T-4

Blackleg of Tobacco

6/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Blackleg becomes a concern whenever Kentucky experiences extended periods of warm, wet, overcast weather in the spring. This disease, also referred to as bacterial soft rot, is one of the most serious problems likely to be encountered on tobacco seedlings. Blackleg has the potential for destroying large numbers of plants in a relatively short period of time. As with other diseases in the float system, proper management goes a long way in preventing problems with blackleg.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 428 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-AG-T-1

Pythium Root Rot in Tobacco Float Systems

5/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Pythium root rot is the most common disease found in tobacco float beds in Kentucky; it can cause severe losses or delays in transplanting. Damage caused by this disease can be minimized through a combination of sound management practices and timely application of fungicide.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Tobacco Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-T series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, tobacco
Size: 883 kb
Pages: 3



ID-172

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Pests of Solanaceous Crops in Kentucky

4/29/2011 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Kenny Seebold, John Strang

Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter when producing solanaceous crops (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and potatoes) in Kentucky.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 2.00 mb
Pages: 32



PPFS-VG-13

Late Blight of Tomato

4/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Late blight is an extremely important and damaging disease of tomatoes and potatoes, and can be found nearly anywhere these crops are produced. Total crop failures are common with this disease. In the United States, significant losses occur each year--mainly in northeastern and north-central states. However, serious outbreaks have been reported in the southeastern U.S. as well.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 565 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-14

Recognizing Late Blight on Tomato Seedlings

4/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Tomato seedlings that have late blight when transplanted can serve as sources of inoculum (spores) that can spread to nearby gardens and commercial plantings, so every measure should be taken to prevent these plants from making it to the field. The added threat is that sources of disease are introduced early in the tomato production season, magnifying the potential for heavy losses in seasons that favor late blight.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 436 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-VG-8

Gummy Stem Blight and Black Rot of Cucurbits

4/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Gummy stem blight is an important disease of cucurbits in many parts of Kentucky. Under conditions favorable to disease development, commercial growers and home gardeners may experience heavy losses. This disease can occur at any point in plant growth, from seedling stage to fruit in storage. Gummy stem blight is the name given to the disease when leaves and stems are infected. Muskmelon (cantaloupe), cucumber, and watermelon are most commonly affected by this phase of the disease. Black rot refers to the same disease on fruit; it is seen less often than the foliar phase.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 584 kb
Pages: 3



PPFS-VG-4

Phytophthora Blight of Cucurbits and Peppers

3/1/2011 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Under ideal conditions, Phytophthora blight is an aggressive, fast moving disease that can cause extensive losses. This disease has become increasingly problematic on cucurbits and solanaceous crops in the United States. During the past decade, Phytophthora blight has been causing significant losses in several major vegetable production areas of the U.S. In Kentucky, serious outbreaks have been reported on summer squash, winter squash, cucumbers, watermelons, and peppers.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 544 kb
Pages: 5



PR-608

2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/20/2010 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Paul Bachi, Sandra Bastin, Julie Beale, Steve Berberich, Ric Bessin, Bob Caudle, Jennie Condra, Tim Coolong, Leighia Eggett, Vaden Fenton, Lucas Hanks, John Hartman, Nathan Howell, Kelly Jackson, June Johnston, Chlodys Johnstone, Patrick Kelley, Katie Kittrell, Janet Lensing, Amy Lentz Poston, Sara Long, Patty Lucas, Sean Lynch, Logan Minter, John Obrycki, Janet Pfeiffer, Sutapa Roy, Marc Ruberg, Rebecca Schnelle, Delia Scott, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Joseph Tucker, Sarah Vanek, Jeff Wheeler, John Wilhoit, Mark Williams, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, County Extension, Entomology, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Kentucky State University, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.20 mb
Pages: 70



PPFS-VG-7

Fruit Rots of Cucurbits

11/1/2010 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the fruit of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 315 kb
Pages: 5



PR-603

2009 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/11/2009 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Paul Bachi, Julie Beale, Tim Coolong, Vaden Fenton, John Hartman, Ryan Hays, Otto Hoffman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, June Johnston, Terry Jones, Amy Lentz Poston, Sara Long, Brandon O'Daniel, Janet Pfeiffer, Rebecca Schnelle, Kenny Seebold, Pam Sigler, Darrell Slone, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, Crystal Sparks, John Strang, Ginny Travis, Richard Warner, Jeff Wheeler, John Wilhoit, Patsy Wilson, Dwight Wolfe

The 2009 Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report includes results for more than 45 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 19 counties in Kentucky. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools that they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Family and Consumer Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 850 kb
Pages: 56



ID-91

An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cucurbit Crops in Kentucky

7/27/2009 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Terry Jones, Kenny Seebold, John Strang

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed to reduce their negative impact on the crop, although pests are rarely eliminated.

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: plant diseases
Size: 1.86 mb
Pages: 24



PR-572

2008 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/1/2008 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Tim Coolong, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, Vaden Fenton, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Wuyang Hu, Dewayne Ingram, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Paul Vincelli, Richard Warner, John Wilhoit, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 800 kb
Pages: 72



HO-81

Ornamental Corn Production

7/10/2008 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tim Coolong, Terry Jones, Joe Masabni, Kenny Seebold, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: corn, farm crops, grain crops
Size: 1.23 mb
Pages: 12



PPFS-VG-6

Bacterial Canker of Tomato

7/1/2008 (new)
Authors: Kenny Seebold

Bacterial canker is a potentially serious disease of tomato that can occur in commercial plantings and home gardens. This infectious disease is capable of spreading rapidly, resulting in devastating losses. It is a particularly difficult disease to manage because not only is there no cure, but the pathogen can be hard to eradicate once it has been introduced into a greenhouse, garden, or field.

Departments: Plant Pathology
Series: Vegetable Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-VG series)
Tags: farm crops, plant diseases, vegetables
Size: 392 kb
Pages: 3



PR-555

2007 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

11/29/2007 (new)
Authors: Doug Archbold, Tim Coolong, Tom Cottrell, Courtney Flood, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Wuyang Hu, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Richard Warner, John Wilhoit, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 92



ID-119

Ornamental Gourd Production in Kentucky

1/3/2007 (minor revision)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Terry Jones, Joe Masabni, Amanda Sears, Kenny Seebold, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags:
Size: 281 kb
Pages: 12



PR-538

2006 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/15/2006 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Dan Potter, Brent Rowell, Amanda Sears, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.34 mb
Pages: 82



PR-521

2005 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report

12/30/2005 (new)
Authors: Ric Bessin, Tom Cottrell, Rick Durham, John Hartman, Nathan Howard, Nathan Howell, Terry Jones, Kaan Kurtural, Joe Masabni, Brent Rowell, Christopher Schardl, Amanda Sears, Kenny Seebold, Bonnie Sigmon, Chris Smigell, John Snyder, Dave Spalding, John Strang, Paul Vincelli, Mark Williams, Tim Woods

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, fruits and nuts, research, variety trials, vegetables
Size: 1.56 mb
Pages: 98