University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Chris Teutsch



Managing Frost Damaged Alfalfa Stands
3/19/2018 (new)

Wide fluctuations in springtime temperature are common in Kentucky. Late freezing temperatures in the spring can cause damage to alfalfa depending on how far along it is in breaking dormancy. This publication provides information on the effect of low spring temperatures on both established and new alfalfa stands that have begun growth, as well as a method of predicting sensitivity to late frosts or freezes. | AGR-236
web only | 3 pages | 2,110 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 2,397 kb


Baleage: Frequently Asked Questions
3/5/2018 (new)

Baled silage, or "baleage", is an excellent method for forage harvest, storage and feed efficiency. Baled silage allows forage to be harvested at higher whole plant moisture levels than required for dry hay. Baleage is ideal for spring cuttings of annual and perennial forages when seasonally frequent rainfall events provide little opportunity for properly curing dry hay. Many producers who want to harvest high quality small grain crops have found baleage to be a good fit for their operation. | AGR-235
web only | 4 pages | 2,625 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 145 kb


Warm Season Annual Grasses in Kentucky
3/5/2018 (new)

In Kentucky, cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limits growth during the summer months. Warm-season annual grasses can fill this gap with relatively high quality forage when properly managed. The purpose of this publication is to provide an overview of the various summer annuals for Kentucky. | AGR-229
2,000 printed copies | 3 pages | 1,032 words | 25 downloads | PDF: 1,316 kb


Sudangrass and Sorghum-sudangrass Hybrids
2/19/2018 (new)

Sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are developed by crossing sorghum with true sudangrass. The result is an annual grass that resembles sudangrass, but has coarser stems, taller growth habit, and higher yields. Like sudangrass, hybrids will regrow after grazing if growth is not limited by environmental factors. The coarse stems are difficult to cure as dry hay, therefore these grasses are best utilized for grazing, chopped silage and baleage. | AGR-234
web only | 2 pages | 999 words | 13 downloads | PDF: 785 kb


Foxtail Millet
2/19/2018 (new)

Foxtail millet (German millet) is a fine-stemmed summer annual used mainly for emergency hay or pasture for cattle. It is the lowest yielding of the summer annual grasses since it will not regrow after cutting. It can also be used as a smoother crop when transitioning to other perennial forage crops. Foxtail millet is also commonly used for wildlife plantings to produce food and cover for doves, quail, and other birds. | AGR-233
web only | 2 pages | 665 words | 14 downloads | PDF: 960 kb


Crabgrass
2/19/2018 (new)

Crabgrass possesses significant potential for supplying high quality summer forage although it is considered a weed by many. A primary advantage of crabgrass is that it is well adapted to Kentucky and occurs naturally in most summer pastures, especially those that have been overgrazed. It is also highly palatable and a prolific re-seeder. Planting an improved variety of crabgrass is recommended because the production of naturally-occurring ecotypes varies greatly. Crabgrass is best utilized by grazing. | AGR-232
web only | 2 pages | 803 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 428 kb


Pearl Millet
2/19/2018 (new)

The primary benefits of pearl millet are that it does not contain prussic acid and is not susceptible to the sugarcane aphid. Dwarf varieties are available, which are leafier and better suited for grazing. | AGR-231
web only | 2 pages | 681 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 1,183 kb


Forage Sorghum
2/19/2018 (new)

Forage sorghum is the tallest of the summer annuals, reaching 6 to 15 feet in height and is best harvested as silage. Taller varieties produce high forage yield but can lodge, making them difficult to harvest mechanically. Some varieties have been developed that are shorter with increased resistance to lodging. Forage sorghums, like corn, are harvested once per season by direct chopping. While forage sorghum yields are similar to corn, they are lower in energy. The primary advantage of utilizing sorghum for silage production is its greater drought tolerance. | AGR-230
web only | 2 pages | 926 words | 12 downloads | PDF: 567 kb


Possible Causes of Yellowing Alfalfa
2/16/2018 (new)

During spring, several leaf spotting diseases--including Leptosphaerulina (Lepto) leaf spot and spring black stem/leaf spot--are common in alfalfa. Leaf spotting diseases result in distinct round to elongated spots that sometimes have a dark margin. Very wet weather in spring and early summer favor activity of leaf spotting diseases in first and second cuttings. Wet and humid weather during summer favor other leaf spotting and blighting diseases. All leaf spots and blights weaken plants, but alfalfa often outgrows the damage in later cuttings. Maintain a regular cutting schedule, cutting at 30- to 35-day intervals. | PPFS-AG-F-10
web only | 4 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 754 kb


2017 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials
12/20/2017 (new)

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years. | PR-738
1,500 printed copies | 24 pages | 7,180 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 2,850 kb


2017 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)
12/20/2017 (new)

The major factor in selecting a variety of summer annual grass is yield, both total and seasonal. Growth after first cutting is strongly dependent on available moisture and nitrogen fertilization. Summer annual grasses generally have different characteristics and uses. The major factors in selecting cool season cereal grass varieties are yield, winter survival and regrowth. | PR-737
400 printed copies | 20 pages | 7,500 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 2,125 kb


2017 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report
12/18/2017 (new)

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival. | PR-735
500 printed copies | 12 pages | 4,149 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 1,300 kb


2017 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report
12/13/2017 (new)

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival. | PR-736
500 printed copies | 8 pages | 3,029 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 725 kb


2017 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/11/2017 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-734
400 printed copies | 4 pages | 2,182 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 450 kb


2017 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/11/2017 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. | PR-733
350 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,924 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 413 kb


2017 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report
12/6/2017 (new)

This report provides current yield data on annual and perennial ryegrass varieties in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting varieties. Tables 14, 15, and 16 show summaries of all annual and perennial ryegrass and festulolium varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 17 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety test-ing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications. | PR-732
400 printed copies | 16 pages | 1,898 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 1,350 kb


2017 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report
12/1/2017 (new)

This report provides maturity and yield data on timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky. Tables 10 and 11 show summaries of all timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications. | PR-731
400 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,230 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 542 kb


2017 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report
12/1/2017 (new)

This report provides current yield data on tall fescue varieties and similar grass species in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting tall fescue varieties. Tables 15 and 16 show a summary of all tall fescue and bromegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 17 years. The UK Forage Extension Web site at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications. | PR-730
600 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,844 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 1,396 kb


2017 Orchardgrass Report
12/1/2017 (new)

This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties. Table 11 shows a summary of all orchardgrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK For-age Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and from a large number of other forage publications. | PR-729
600 printed copies | 8 pages | 1,260 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 833 kb


2017 Alfalfa Report
11/29/2017 (new)

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications. | PR-727
400 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,822 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,530 kb


2017 Red and White Clover Report
11/27/2017 (new)

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications. | PR-728
600 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,739 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 757 kb