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Chris Teutsch


AGR-262

Utilizing Drought Stressed Soybeans for Forage

2/10/2021 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch, Katherine VanValin

Although soybeans are commonly grown as a grain crop, they can be grazed or harvested as either a hay or silage crop. This most commonly occurs when the grain potential of the soybean crop has been reduced by drought, hail damage, or early frost. A realistic forage yield expectation for drought stressed soybeans would be 1.5 to 2.0 tons of dry matter per acre. The objective of this article is to provide practical tips for successfully, grazing, conserving and feeding drought stressed soybeans.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: farm crops, grain crops, soybeans
Size: 380 kb
Pages: 3



AGR-173

Baling Forage Crops for Silage

1/11/2021 (major revision)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage may be stored for winter feeding when pasture production is limited, for use in confinement feeding systems, or for cash hay. Dry hay is the most popular storage method since it stores well for long periods and is better suited to cash sale and shipping than high moisture forages. However, silage may be more suitable in situations where hay curing is difficult. It is possible to make high quality silage or haylage using long (unchopped) forage crops baled with large round balers, although balers may need modification to handle wet material.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops
Size: 957 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-255

Strategies for Reclaiming Hay Feeding Areas

12/15/2020 (new)
Authors: Kelly Mercier, Chris Teutsch

Hoof damage from livestock during the winter months can result in almost complete disturbance of desired vegetation and soil structure in and around hay feeding areas. Even well-designed hay feeding pads will have significant damage at the edges where animals enter and leave. Highly disturbed areas create perfect growing conditions for summer annual weeds like spiny pigweed and cocklebur. Weed growth is stimulated by lack of competition from a healthy and vigorous sod and the high fertility from the concentrated area of dung, urine, and rotting hay. The objective of this publication is to outline strategies for rapidly establishing stands of desirable forage species on these areas.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: production practices
Size: 985 kb
Pages: 3



PR-791

2020 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/4/2020 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Summer annual grasses provide an important forage crop option for producers in Kentucky. These grasses are mainly used as emergency or supplemental hay and pasture crops, but little information is available on their yield potential. The purpose of this publication is to summarize the University of Kentucky 2013-2019 forage yield trials with sudangrass, sorghum/sudangrass, millets, teff, and cereal crops. Cool season annual grasses (specifically cereal crops) are also used as forages crops for hay, baleage or grazing. The cereal crops used in this report are wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and triticale (Triticum secale).

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 3.10 mb
Pages: 30



AGR-252

Soil Sampling Pastures and Hayfields

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Edwin Ritchey, Chris Teutsch

Adequate soil fertility in pastures and hayfields is key to maintaining productivity and optimizing profitability. Soil testing is the basis of well-designed fertilization and liming programs. In order to develop effective programs, soil samples must be collected in a manner that results in an accurate representation of each pasture or hayfield area. The objective of this publication is to provide guidelines that, when followed, result in representative soil samples.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 480 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-254

Grain Drill Calibration: Don't Make a Mistake--CALIBRATE!

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jessica Buckman, Chris Teutsch

Grain drill calibration is a critical, yet often ignored part of successful forage establishment and pasture renovation. Planting lower seed rates than recommended can result in thin stands that are susceptible to weed encroachment. Planting more than the recommended seeding rate is undesirable due to increased seed costs. The following calibration method can be applied across a wide range of grain drill types and manufacturers and minimizes the need to carry out detailed mathematical calculations.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: equipment and structures, production practices
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 2



AGR-257

Hay Sampling: Strategies for Getting a Good Sample

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jordyn Bush, Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Chris Teutsch

Knowing the nutritional quality of forage and hay is an integral part of a profitable and efficient livestock operation. Accurate estimation of forage quality starts with obtaining a representative sample of the forage to be fed. Proper sampling technique is critical. Hay is preserved in different packages ranging from the small square bale weighing 40-50 lb to the large square bale weighing more than 1500 lb. In Kentucky, most hay is packaged in large round bales weighing between 500 and 1500 lb. Wrapped bale silage is also gaining popularity and should be sampled in a similar manner to large round hay bales with the exceptions listed here.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, production practices
Size: 5.16 mb
Pages: 3



ID-262

Considerations for Utilizing Frozen Small Grains for Forage

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott, Chris Teutsch, Katherine VanValin

Once wheat and other small grains adapt to cooler weather in the fall, they are relatively tolerant of cold temperatures and freeze injury. Frost injury in the spring normally occurs when February and March are unusually warm and small grains initiate growth earlier than normal or from an unusually late frost event. Freezing temperatures during sensitive growth stages can significantly impact grain yield. In some cases, the impact on yield can be moderate to severe.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, farm crops, grain crops, livestock, nutrition and health, small grains
Size: 429 kb
Pages: 4



PR-784

2020 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

12/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is a productive, well-adapted, persistent, soil-conserving, cool-season grass grown on approximately 5.5 million acres in Kentucky. This grass, used for both hay and pasture, is the forage base of most of Kentucky's livestock enterprises, particularly beef cattle. Much of the tall fescue in Kentuckys infected with an internal fungus (endophyte) that produces ergot alkaloids and results in decreased weight gains in growing ruminants and lower pregnancy rates in breeding stock, especially in hot weather. Varieties are now available that are free of this fungal endophyte or infected with a nontoxic endophyte. Varieties in the latter group are also referred to as "novel" or "friendly" endophyte varieties, because their endophyte improves stand survival without creating animal production problems.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.37 mb
Pages: 14



PR-789

2020 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the bromegrasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 12



PR-790

2020 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

12/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 704 kb
Pages: 128



PR-783

2020 Orchardgrass Report

11/24/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Orchardgrass (Dactylus glomerata) is a high-quality, productive, cool-season grass that is well-adapted to Kentucky conditions. This grass is used for pasture, hay, green chop, and silage, but it requires better management than tall fescue for greater yields, higher quality, and longer stand life. It produces an open, bunch-type sod, making it compatible with alfalfa or red clover as a pasture and hay crop or as habitat for wildlife. This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 699 kb
Pages: 8



PR-787

2020 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/23/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 385 kb
Pages: 4



PR-788

2020 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/23/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 393 kb
Pages: 4



PR-785

2020 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

11/20/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Timothy (Phleum pratense) is the fourth most widely sown cool-season perennial grass used in Kentucky for forage--after tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass. It is a late-maturing bunchgrass that is primarily harvested as hay, particularly for horses. It also can be used for grazing or wildlife habitat. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is a high-quality, highly palatable, long-lived pasture plant with limited use for hay. It tolerates close, frequent grazing better than most grasses. It has low yields and low summer production and becomes dormant and brown during hot, dry summers. Kentucky bluegrass is slow to establish.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, science and technology, variety trials
Size: 550 kb
Pages: 6



PR-786

2020 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

11/20/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) are high-quality, productive, cool-season grasses used in Kentucky. Both have exceptionally high seedling vigor and are highly palatable to livestock. Perennial ryegrass can be used as a short-lived hay or pasture plant and has growth characteristics similar to tall fescue. Festuloliums are hybrids between various fescues and ryegrasses with higher quality than tall fescue and improved stand survival over perennial ryegrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 14



PR-781

2020 Alfalfa Report

11/16/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 10



PR-782

2020 Red and White Clover Report

11/16/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 14 and 15 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at forages.ca.uky.edu contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 900 kb
Pages: 8



PR-767

2019 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

3/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Timothy (Phleum pratense) is the fourth most widely sown cool-season perennial grass used in Kentucky for forage--after tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass. It is a late-maturing bunchgrass that is primarily harvested as hay, particularly for horses. It also can be used for grazing or wildlife habitat. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is a high-quality, highly palatable, long-lived pasture plant with limited use for hay. It tolerates close, frequent grazing better than most grasses. It has low yields and low summer production and becomes dormant and brown during hot, dry summers. Kentucky bluegrass is slow to establish.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, science and technology, variety trials
Size: 521 kb
Pages: 6



PR-774

2019 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/18/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 1.26 mb
Pages: 28



PR-773

2019 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/12/2019 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Summer annual grasses provide an important forage crop option for producers in Kentucky. These grasses are mainly used as emergency or supplemental hay and pasture crops, but little information is available on their yield potential. The purpose of this publication is to summarize the University of Kentucky 2013-2019 forage yield trials with sudangrass, sorghum/sudangrass, millets, teff, and cereal crops. Cool season annual grasses (specifically cereal crops) are also used as forages crops for hay, baleage or grazing. The cereal crops used in this report are wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and triticale (Triticum secale).

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 3.14 mb
Pages: 28



PR-771

2019 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the bromegrasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.12 mb
Pages: 12



PR-772

2019 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

12/5/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 702 kb
Pages: 8



PR-769

2019 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 354 kb
Pages: 4



PR-770

2019 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/4/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 451 kb
Pages: 6



PR-765

2019 Orchardgrass Report

11/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Orchardgrass (Dactylus glomerata) is a high-quality, productive, cool-season grass that is well-adapted to Kentucky conditions. This grass is used for pasture, hay, green chop, and silage, but it requires better management than tall fescue for greater yields, higher quality, and longer stand life. It produces an open, bunch-type sod, making it compatible with alfalfa or red clover as a pasture and hay crop or as habitat for wildlife. This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 767 kb
Pages: 8



PR-768

2019 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

11/27/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) are high-quality, productive, cool-season grasses used in Kentucky. Both have exceptionally high seedling vigor and are highly palatable to livestock. Perennial ryegrass can be used as a short-lived hay or pasture plant and has growth characteristics similar to tall fescue. Festuloliums are hybrids between various fescues and ryegrasses with higher quality than tall fescue and improved stand survival over perennial ryegrass.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 16



PR-763

2019 Alfalfa Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 8



PR-764

2019 Red and White Clover Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 14 and 15 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at forages.ca.uky.edu contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 873 kb
Pages: 8



PR-766

2019 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

11/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is a productive, well-adapted, persistent, soil-conserving, cool-season grass grown on approximately 5.5 million acres in Kentucky. This grass, used for both hay and pasture, is the forage base of most of Kentucky's livestock enterprises, particularly beef cattle. Much of the tall fescue in Kentuckys infected with an internal fungus (endophyte) that produces ergot alkaloids and results in decreased weight gains in growing ruminants and lower pregnancy rates in breeding stock, especially in hot weather. Varieties are now available that are free of this fungal endophyte or infected with a nontoxic endophyte. Varieties in the latter group are also referred to as "novel" or "friendly" endophyte varieties, because their endophyte improves stand survival without creating animal production problems

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 12



PR-753

2018 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The major factor in selecting a variety of summer annual grass is yield, both total and seasonal. Growth after first cutting is strongly dependent on available moisture and nitrogen fertilization. Summer annual grasses generally have different characteristics and uses. The major factors in selecting cool season cereal grass varieties are yield, winter survival and regrowth.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 24



PR-754

2018 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 3.10 mb
Pages: 28



PR-752

2018 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

11/30/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 859 kb
Pages: 8



PR-746

2018 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on tall fescue varieties and similar grass species in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting tall fescue varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all tall fescue and bromegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 17 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.28 mb
Pages: 12



PR-747

2018 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides maturity and yield data on timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky. Tables 10 and 11 show summaries of all timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 546 kb
Pages: 6



PR-748

2018 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on annual and perennial ryegrass varieties in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting varieties. Tables 15, 16, and 17 show summaries of all annual and perennial ryegrass and festulolium varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 17 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 16



PR-749

2018 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. Table 5 shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 18 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 350 kb
Pages: 4



PR-750

2018 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. Table 10 shows a summary of all white clover varieties tested in Kentucky during the last 15 years.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 504 kb
Pages: 6



PR-751

2018 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

11/27/2018 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.45 mb
Pages: 14



PR-745

2018 Orchardgrass Report

11/20/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties. Table 11 shows a summary of all orchardgrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and from a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags:
Size: 898 kb
Pages: 8



PR-743

2018 Alfalfa Report

11/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 12



PR-744

2018 Red and White Clover Report

11/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 12 and 13 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 925 kb
Pages: 8



AGR-236

Managing Frost Damaged Alfalfa Stands

3/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Matthew Dixon, Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Wide fluctuations in springtime temperature are common in Kentucky. Late freezing temperatures in the spring can cause damage to alfalfa depending on how far along it is in breaking dormancy. This publication provides information on the effect of low spring temperatures on both established and new alfalfa stands that have begun growth, as well as a method of predicting sensitivity to late frosts or freezes.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes
Size: 2.40 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-229

Warm Season Annual Grasses in Kentucky

3/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

In Kentucky, cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limits growth during the summer months. Warm-season annual grasses can fill this gap with relatively high quality forage when properly managed. The purpose of this publication is to provide an overview of the various summer annuals for Kentucky.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 1.32 mb
Pages: 3



AGR-235

Baleage: Frequently Asked Questions

3/5/2018 (new)
Authors: Mike Collins, Dennis Hancock, Jimmy Henning, Brandon Sears, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Baled silage, or "baleage", is an excellent method for forage harvest, storage and feed efficiency. Baled silage allows forage to be harvested at higher whole plant moisture levels than required for dry hay. Baleage is ideal for spring cuttings of annual and perennial forages when seasonally frequent rainfall events provide little opportunity for properly curing dry hay. Many producers who want to harvest high quality small grain crops have found baleage to be a good fit for their operation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, other crops
Size: 145 kb
Pages: 4



AGR-230

Forage Sorghum

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage sorghum is the tallest of the summer annuals, reaching 6 to 15 feet in height and is best harvested as silage. Taller varieties produce high forage yield but can lodge, making them difficult to harvest mechanically. Some varieties have been developed that are shorter with increased resistance to lodging. Forage sorghums, like corn, are harvested once per season by direct chopping. While forage sorghum yields are similar to corn, they are lower in energy. The primary advantage of utilizing sorghum for silage production is its greater drought tolerance.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 567 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-231

Pearl Millet

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The primary benefits of pearl millet are that it does not contain prussic acid and is not susceptible to the sugarcane aphid. Dwarf varieties are available, which are leafier and better suited for grazing.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 1.18 mb
Pages: 2



AGR-232

Crabgrass

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Crabgrass possesses significant potential for supplying high quality summer forage although it is considered a weed by many. A primary advantage of crabgrass is that it is well adapted to Kentucky and occurs naturally in most summer pastures, especially those that have been overgrazed. It is also highly palatable and a prolific re-seeder. Planting an improved variety of crabgrass is recommended because the production of naturally-occurring ecotypes varies greatly. Crabgrass is best utilized by grazing.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 428 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-233

Foxtail Millet

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Foxtail millet (German millet) is a fine-stemmed summer annual used mainly for emergency hay or pasture for cattle. It is the lowest yielding of the summer annual grasses since it will not regrow after cutting. It can also be used as a smoother crop when transitioning to other perennial forage crops. Foxtail millet is also commonly used for wildlife plantings to produce food and cover for doves, quail, and other birds.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 960 kb
Pages: 2



AGR-234

Sudangrass and Sorghum-sudangrass Hybrids

2/19/2018 (new)
Authors: Jimmy Henning, Tom Keene, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are developed by crossing sorghum with true sudangrass. The result is an annual grass that resembles sudangrass, but has coarser stems, taller growth habit, and higher yields. Like sudangrass, hybrids will regrow after grazing if growth is not limited by environmental factors. The coarse stems are difficult to cure as dry hay, therefore these grasses are best utilized for grazing, chopped silage and baleage.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Agronomy (AGR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses
Size: 785 kb
Pages: 2



PPFS-AG-F-10

Possible Causes of Yellowing Alfalfa

2/16/2018 (new)
Authors: Chris Teutsch, Paul Vincelli, Kiersten Wise

During spring, several leaf spotting diseases--including Leptosphaerulina (Lepto) leaf spot and spring black stem/leaf spot--are common in alfalfa. Leaf spotting diseases result in distinct round to elongated spots that sometimes have a dark margin. Very wet weather in spring and early summer favor activity of leaf spotting diseases in first and second cuttings. Wet and humid weather during summer favor other leaf spotting and blighting diseases. All leaf spots and blights weaken plants, but alfalfa often outgrows the damage in later cuttings. Maintain a regular cutting schedule, cutting at 30- to 35-day intervals.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences, Plant Pathology
Series: Forage Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-AG-F series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, plant diseases
Size: 754 kb
Pages: 4



PR-737

2017 Annual Grass Report: Warm Season and Cool Season (Cereals)

12/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Bill Bruening, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

The major factor in selecting a variety of summer annual grass is yield, both total and seasonal. Growth after first cutting is strongly dependent on available moisture and nitrogen fertilization. Summer annual grasses generally have different characteristics and uses. The major factors in selecting cool season cereal grass varieties are yield, winter survival and regrowth.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 2.13 mb
Pages: 20



PR-738

2017 Long-Term Summary of Kentucky Forage Variety Trials

12/20/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Forage crops occupy approximately 7 million acres in Kentucky. Forages provide a majority of the nutrition for beef, dairy, horse, goat, sheep, and wildlife in the state. In addition, forage crops play an environmentally friendly role in soil conservation, water quality, and air quality. There are over 60 forage species adapted to the climate and soil conditions of Kentucky. Only 10 to 12 of these species occupy the majority of the acreage, but within these species there is a tremendous variation in varieties. This publication was developed to provide a user-friendly guide to choosing the best variety for producers based on a summary of forage yield and grazing tolerance trials conducted in Kentucky over the past 12 to 15 years.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: farm crops, research, variety trials
Size: 2.85 mb
Pages: 24



PR-735

2017 Cool-Season Grass Grazing Tolerance Report

12/18/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue, orchardgrass, and Kentucky bluegrass are the primary pasture grasses in Kentucky. Other species such as perennial ryegrass, festulolium, and the brome grasses can be used in pasture systems. Little is known about the effect of variety on the grazing tolerance of these cool-season grass species. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, and other species when they are subjected to continuous, heavy grazing pressure by cattle within the grazing season. The main focus will be on plant stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.30 mb
Pages: 12



PR-736

2017 Cool-Season Grass Horse Grazing Tolerance Report

12/13/2017 (new)
Authors: Laurie Lawrence, Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and orchardgrass are dominant pasture grasses for horses in Kentucky. Variety evaluations for yield have been carried out for many years, but little work has been done to establish the effect of variety on persistence when subjected to close, continuous grazing by horses. The purpose of this report is to summarize current research on the grazing tolerance of varieties of tall fescue, orchardgrass, and other species when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure by horses within the grazing season. The main focus will be on stand survival.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 725 kb
Pages: 8



PR-733

2017 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 413 kb
Pages: 4



PR-734

2017 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report

12/11/2017 (new)
Authors: Joey Clark, Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 4



PR-732

2017 Annual and Perennial Ryegrass and Festulolium Report

12/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on annual and perennial ryegrass varieties in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting varieties. Tables 14, 15, and 16 show summaries of all annual and perennial ryegrass and festulolium varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 17 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety test-ing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.35 mb
Pages: 16



PR-729

2017 Orchardgrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on orchardgrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting orchardgrass varieties. Table 11 shows a summary of all orchardgrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and from a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 833 kb
Pages: 8



PR-730

2017 Tall Fescue and Bromegrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield data on tall fescue varieties and similar grass species in trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting tall fescue varieties. Tables 15 and 16 show a summary of all tall fescue and bromegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 17 years. The UK Forage Extension Web site at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 1.40 mb
Pages: 12



PR-731

2017 Timothy and Kentucky Bluegrass Report

12/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Tim Phillips, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides maturity and yield data on timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky. Tables 10 and 11 show summaries of all timothy and Kentucky bluegrass varieties tested in Kentucky for the last 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, grasses, research, variety trials
Size: 542 kb
Pages: 6



PR-727

2017 Alfalfa Report

11/29/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 1.53 mb
Pages: 12



PR-728

2017 Red and White Clover Report

11/27/2017 (new)
Authors: Gene Olson, Ray Smith, Chris Teutsch

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications.

Departments: Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Progress Report (PR series)
Tags: cover and forage crops, farm crops, legumes, research, variety trials
Size: 757 kb
Pages: 6