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Paul Vijayakumar



CCD-PFS-4
Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Part 2
1/29/2019 (new)

 UK Authors: Bryan Brady, Badrinath Vengari Jagannathan,
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Food Connection
 Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversity (CCD-PFS series)
 Tags:

Although the compliance dates for the Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water have been extended, growers are encouraged to start familiarizing themselves with the process of water sampling. In continuation to Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Introduction that discussed the different types of water sources, how to calculate a water sample and a brief overview of how to properly take a sample, this paper will explain in detail how and where to take water samples for testing. In addition, it will also provide details on how to read and understand the results of your water test and how to build a water profile. Finally, it will include a list and map with the locations of all labs with approved methods to make compliance as simple as possible.

web only | 5 pages | 1,751 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb



CCD-PFS-3
Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables for Home Use
6/6/2018 (new)

 UK Authors: Felix Akharume, Michael Montross,
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
 Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversity (CCD-PFS series)
 Tags: food and nutrition, food science, fruits,

Many farm-harvested or market-purchased fresh fruits and vegetables are consumed fresh or frozen, with little to none utilized as dry products; in general, dried fruits and vegetables are purchased directly from the market whenever needed. With the wide availability of tabletop kitchen equipment for fruit and vegetable processing (mechanical cutters, slicers, homemade dehydrators, blenders, etc.), consumers and small farmers with excess harvest or unsold fresh products can take the opportunity to process their fresh fruits and vegetables into dried snacks for direct use or sale at a farmerís market. The advantage of these dried products is their stable shelf life, versatility, and overall value addition. Dried products can be used at any time (6-12 months) with little or no loss in quality and can be used as intermediate goods in other products such as breakfast cereals. This publication presents easy-to-follow guidelines and conditions for processing selected fruits and vegetables into dried products.

web only | 8 pages | 3,748 words | 9 downloads | PDF: 693 kb



CCD-PFS-2
Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety Rule Agricultural Water, Introduction
6/6/2018 (new)

 UK Authors: Bryan Brady, Badrinath Vengari Jagannathan,
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Food Connection
 Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversity (CCD-PFS series)
 Tags:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in 2011 with the goal of preventing food safety problems. The FSMA Produce Safety Rule (PSR) is the first mandatory federal standard for fruit and vegetable production in the United States. Prior to FSMA, growers, packers, and the produce industry were encouraged to follow voluntary guidance such as the FDA's 1998 "Guide to Minimize Food Safety Hazard for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables." The FDA has very detailed guidelines for handling produce when it might touch water or a surface that is wet. Water in this situation would be called agricultural water. There are two kinds of agricultural water: water used to grow and care for the plants (production water) and water used to wash the produce during harvest and after it is state or territory of the United States, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

web only | 5 pages | 2,390 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 920 kb



CCD-PFS-1
Produce Food Safety: Packing and Storing
11/6/2017 (new)

 UK Authors: Paul Vijayakumar
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
 Series: Produce Food Safety: Center for Crop Diversity (CCD-PFS series)
 Tags:

: If you intend to sell your produce, you'll need to package it. Some growers immediately assume that they'll need a large, complicated packing shed with state-of-the art technology. Typically this is not the case, and for some situations you might not need a packing facility at all. Before we go into some of the best practices for managing a packing shed, you should first consider whether you need one at all. Many of the practices discussed in this publication will depend on the requirements of your buyer. The first step before making upgrades to your food safety infrastructure is to talk to your buyer--ask them how they expect products packaged, box sizes, and whether they expect the product to be washed. Do they currently expect a third-party Good Agriculture Practice (GAP) audit? Do they anticipate requiring one in the near future? As long as you are meeting all regulatory requirements and taking common sense steps to keep your produce safe, there is no need to exceed the expectations of your buyer. In the case of Farmers Markets and CSAs, the expectations for washing can be highly variable.

web only | 7 pages | 1,176 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 3,000 kb



ID-246
Measuring the Ph of Different Food Products
7/21/2017 (new)

 UK Authors: Akinbode Adedeji, Paul Vijayakumar
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags:

The scientific scale for measuring how acidic or basic a substance is when it is dissolved in water is called pH. The pH scale runs from 0 - 14. 0 means it is very acidic, 7 means it is neither acidic nor basic, but just right in the middle like plain water (neutral), and 14 means it is very basic. If you are producing a food product that depends on the acidic components or ingredients of the product to extend its shelf life and ensure the safety of the product, monitoring the pH of food products is very important. Food safety is the biggest reason for monitoring pH, but pH also influences the quality of food products.

web only | 2 pages | 1,743 words | 30 downloads | PDF: 365 kb



ID-243
Management of Wildlife and Domestic Animals on Your Farm: Good Agricultural Practices
1/10/2017 (new)

 UK Authors: Matthew Springer, Paul Vijayakumar
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Forestry and Natural Resources
 Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
 Tags:

Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) are necessary to ensure that fresh fruits and vegetables are harvested, handled, and packaged in a sanitary manner. Field crops are at a higher food safety risk than processed foods because of regular exposure to several sources of contamination, including soil, manure, human handling, domestic and wild animals, and water. While it is impossible to completely eliminate these risks, GAPs ensure that these risks are as small as possible when implemented correctly.

150 printed copies | 3 pages | 2,023 words | 50 downloads | PDF: 908 kb



ASC-227
Foodborne Illness: Risks and Prevention
9/27/2016 (new)

 UK Authors: Melissa Newman, Gregg Rentfrow,
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
 Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
 Tags:

In recent memory, there has been a considerable increase in food recalls and foodborne illness outbreaks. To ensure food safety, everyone involved in the food production chain needs to understand the different factors that could contaminate food and lead to foodborne illness.

web only | 4 pages | 1,597 words | 39 downloads | PDF: 142 kb



IP-78
Understanding Produce Safety Programs and Making a Food Safety Plan
4/4/2016 (new)

 UK Authors: Melissa Newman, Pam Sigler,
 Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Program and Staff Development
 Series: Interprogram (IP series)
 Tags:

Safety of fresh vegetables and fruits is very important because these products are often consumed raw or are minimally processed. For the safety of consumers, farmers who produce our food must know the best practices available to produce, process, handle, and store fresh produce.

web only | 3 pages | 1,757 words | 60 downloads | PDF: 189 kb