University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

Online Publications

Grouped by Department

Horticulture Publications



Pot-in-Pot Nursery Production
1/31/2017 (revised)

"Pot-in-pot" describes a nursery production system that uses containers (production pots) placed inside permanent in-ground containers (socket pots). Pot-in-pot is used for the production of caliper-sized shade trees, flowering trees, and large shrubs. The pot-in-pot system combines many of the benefits of field production with the marketing flexibility of container production. Container-grown plants can be sold at any time of year and with relatively short notice, whereas harvesting of field-grown plants requires more planning and is typically not done during the summer or extremely wet periods. | CCD-SP-7
web only | 5 pages | 2,325 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 918 kb


Ecosystem Services of Landscape Plants: A Guide for Green Industry Professionals
1/23/2017 (new)

This publication is meant to assist green industry professionals in marketing and customer education efforts as they explore marketing their products and services to improve green infrastructure. Consumers are placing increasing value on and acknowledging the critical role that landscape plants play in the urban environment, from reducing urban heat islands to improving the aesthetic experience (i.e. curb appeal) we derive from the landscape of an individual home. | HO-115
web only | 12 pages | 4,507 words | 22 downloads | PDF: 2,547 kb


Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky, 2016
1/5/2017 (reprinted)

A well-planned and properly kept garden should produce 600 to 700 pounds of produce per 1,000 square feet and may include many different crops. Consult "Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens" (ID-133) for the latest recommendations on home vegetable varieties. | ID-128
1 printed copies | 48 pages | 32,061 words | 419 downloads | PDF: 4,000 kb


After Your Ash Has Died: Making an Informed Decision on What to Replant
12/22/2016 (new)

Unfortunately the emerald ash borer is only the latest in a series of invasive pests that have recently decimated our trees. Here, we provide basic information on the death of our ash trees and what types of species are less likely to be impacted by invasive insects and diseases in the future. | ID-241
web only | 5 pages | 4,224 words | 25 downloads | PDF: 247 kb


What Is Your Tree Worth?
12/22/2016 (new)

Occasionally, through no fault of your own, your valuable trees and landscape plants may be damaged. Landscape appraisers are called on to assess individual plants and entire landscapes as a result of storms, human damage, destruction, and failure. Appraisals are an estimate of the nature, quality, value, or utility of an interest or an aspect of real estate. | ID-240
web only | 5 pages | 3,041 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 903 kb


2016 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/13/2016 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collection of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry. | PR-721
1,000 printed copies | 40 pages | 20,554 words | 33 downloads | PDF: 2,804 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Strawberry in Kentucky
11/17/2016 (new)

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky strawberry plantings. | ID-238
1,600 printed copies | 28 pages | 6,288 words | 24 downloads | PDF: 10,025 kb


Planting Container-Grown Trees and Shrubs in Your Landscape
9/14/2016 (new)

Many landscape plants are installed as container-grown (containerized) specimens. These, along with balled and burlapped (B&B) and bareroot, are the three major ways we transplant trees and shrubs from nurseries to our landscapes. The keys to quick establishment and decades of satisfaction are following proven techniques in installation and providing proper care after transplanting. | HO-114
web only | 4 pages | 1,791 words | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,553 kb


Planting Bareroot Trees and Shrubs in Your Landscape
9/14/2016 (new)

Many landscape plants can be installed as bareroot specimens. This method, along with balled and burlapped (B&B) and container grown plants, one of the three major ways we transplant trees and shrubs from nurseries to our landscapes. The keys to quick establishment and decades of satisfaction are following proven techniques in installation and providing proper care after transplanting. | HO-113
web only | 4 pages | 1,846 words | 25 downloads | PDF: 1,441 kb


Soil Percolation: A Key to Survival of Landscape Plants
9/14/2016 (new)

Eighty to 90 percent of disease and insect problems on landscape plants can be traced back to soil problems. Plants must be adapted to the site if they are to meet our expectations of growing, remain healthy, and attractive. | ID-237
web only | 4 pages | 1,929 words | 27 downloads | PDF: 3,289 kb


2011 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
8/30/2016 (new)

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry. | PR-641
web only | 32 pages | 14,698 words | 24 downloads | PDF: 7,642 kb


Maple Syrup
8/17/2016 (new)

Maple syrup is made by processing (boiling) tree sap. Sap may be processed from all maple tree species; the highest sugar content usually occurs in sugar maple and black maple sap. Maple sugaring may occur wherever late winter temperatures permit sap collection, ideally when nighttimes are below freezing and daytime highs do not exceed 45F. Kentucky is among the southernmost states for commercial maple syrup production. | CCD-CP-81
web only | 5 pages | 1,405 words | 1 download | PDF: 1,300 kb


Wine Grapes, Kentucky, 2016: Vinifera
7/15/2016 (revised)

| CCD-BG-9
web only | 6 pages | 1,318 words | - | PDF: 336 kb


Wine Grapes, Kentucky, 2016: French-American Hybrid and American Varieties
7/15/2016 (revised)

| CCD-BG-8
web only | 6 pages | 1,365 words | - | PDF: 340 kb


Table Grapes, Kentucky, 2016
7/15/2016 (revised)

| CCD-BG-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,094 words | 1 download | PDF: 119 kb


2016 Kentucky Grape Costs and Returns: Budget Summaries and Assumptions
7/15/2016 (revised)

Production budgets for American, hybrid, European (vinifera), and table grape varieties were updated to estimate grape profitability in Kentucky for 2016. This analysis indicates that wine grapes can be economically feasible in Kentucky when best production practices are followed that maximize yields and when market prices approach $1,200/ton for vinifera wine grapes and $1,000 per ton for French-American and American hybrid wine grape varieties. Sound management that maximizes wine grape yields and minimizes input costs, with marketing that captures top grape prices, is absolutely necessary for economically viable wholesale grape production in Kentucky. | CCD-BG-6
web only | 3 pages | 1,177 words | - | PDF: 193 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky
7/8/2016 (new)

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance. | ID-235
2,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 5,187 words | 32 downloads | PDF: 5,436 kb


Backyard Berry Disease and Disease Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-25
web only | 4 pages | 1,260 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 1,037 kb


Backyard Grape Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 1,263 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 1,213 kb


Backyard Stone Fruit Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,234 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 890 kb


Backyard Apple Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-21
web only | 4 pages | 1,311 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 1,013 kb


Simplified Backyard Grape Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A simplified backyard grape spray guide (table). | PPFS-FR-S-23
web only | 1 pages | 323 words | 12 downloads | PDF: 351 kb


Simplified Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Peach, nectarine, apricot, plum, and cherry are all stone fruits. Production of these tree fruits requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. Disease resistant cultivars are the preferred method for reducing spray inputs. | PPFS-FR-T-20
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 672 kb


Simplified Backyard Apple Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Apple production requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. | PPFS-FR-T-18
web only | 4 pages | 1,284 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 626 kb


Tomato Disease Management in Greenhouses
12/22/2015 (new)

Tomato is, by far, the most common vegetable crop grown in greenhouses in Indiana and Kentucky. This publication examines common tomato diseases of the greenhouse and provides management recommendations. | ID-233
web only | 6 pages | - | 40 downloads | PDF: 465 kb


2015 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/21/2015 (new)

The 2015 Fruit and Vegetable Crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in seven counties in Kentucky: Jefferson, Spencer, Trimble, Shelby, Caldwell, Franklin, and Fayette. | PR-706
1,000 printed copies | 44 pages | 27,911 words | 56 downloads | PDF: 1,542 kb


Economic Impacts of the Kentucky Green Industry
12/16/2015 (revised)

The green industry, comprised of firms engaged in the production and use of landscape and floral crops and related supplies and equipment and the design, construction, and maintenance of landscapes, has a significant impact on Kentucky's economy. Green-industry enterprise owners, managers, and employees should be aware of their economic impacts, and policy makers and other state leaders need to know the importance of this industry as potential laws, regulations and resource allocations are considered. This publication is intended to provide a brief summary of the 2013 economic impacts of the green industry in Kentucky. | HO-108
web only | 3 pages | 1,841 words | 31 downloads | PDF: 152 kb


Characteristics of Kentucky's Nursery and Greenhouse Industries
12/16/2015 (revised)

The purpose of this publication is to characterize Kentucky's nursery and greenhouse industry in relation to the national and regional industry by gleaning information from the national surveys conducted by the Green Industry Research Consortium for 2013, 2008, and 2003. The survey data will be augmented by information obtained from the experiences of the authors and from conversations with nursery owners. | HO-89
web only | 10 pages | 3,937 words | 35 downloads | PDF: 399 kb


Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers, 2016-17
11/23/2015 (revised)

Successful vegetable production generally requires the grower to make daily decisions regarding pest management, irrigation, and cultural practices. The most widely commercially-grown vegetables in Kentucky are included in this publication. | ID-36
3,700 printed copies | 134 pages | 106,717 words | 56 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


Industrial Hemp: Legal Issues
9/24/2015 (revised)

Industrial hemp was widely grown in the United States from the Colonial Period until the mid-1800s. During that time, Kentucky established itself as the leading hemp producer in the U.S. After the Civil War, hemp production declined in Kentucky, as well as in other areas of the country. Production temporarily resumed as part of the war effort during World War II. However, once the war was over, acreages dwindled until U.S. production ended in 1958. However, the last couple of decades have brought a renewed interest in commercial hemp as an alternative or supplementary crop. As the pro-hemp movement has spread, a number of states, including Kentucky, have passed laws favoring its production, generally in connection with scientific, economic, and environmental research studies. | CCD-CP-32
web only | 3 pages | 1,072 words | 1 download | PDF: 803 kb


Industrial Hemp Production
9/23/2015 (revised)

Industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a versatile plant that can be grown for its fiber, seed, or oil. Hemp fields were once a common sight in Kentucky during the state's prominence as the leading hemp producer in the U.S. Although commercial hemp production ceased throughout North America in the late 1950s, there is currently renewed interest in growing this crop. While hemp faces significant legal obstacles due to its close relationship to the marijuana plant, there are a number of states, including Kentucky, working toward reviving the hemp industry. Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (the federal farm bill) authorized state departments of agriculture in states that have legalized hemp, including Kentucky, to develop pilot programs for industrial hemp research. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has been working with universities, farmers and processors around the state since 2014 to implement pilot programs. | CCD-CP-33
web only | 6 pages | 2,682 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Tree Wounds: Invitations to Wood Decay Fungi
9/1/2015 (new)

Wood decay leads to loss of tree vigor and vitality, resulting in decline, dieback, and structural failure. Wounds play an important part in this process since they are the primary point of entry for wood decay pathogens. While other factors may also result in decline and dieback, the presence of wounds and/or outward signs of pathogens provides confirmation that wood decay is an underlying problem. Wounds and wood decay reduce the ability of trees to support themselves. | PPFS-OR-W-1
web only | 7 pages | 1,947 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 2,953 kb


Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos Cucurbitaceos en Kentucky
7/15/2015 (new)

Esta guia cubre los problemas abioticos y bioticos mas comunes que ocurren en cucurbitaceas (Familia Curcubitaceae) en Kentucky. Este grupo de plantas, al que tambien se refiere como enredaderas trepadoras, incluye al pepino, melon (cantalope), sandia, melones especiales, calabazas (o zapallos), calabacines, y cogordas (conocidas tambien como calabazas de peregrino, ayotes, jicaras, o porongos [gourds en ingles]). | ID-91s
2,500 printed copies | 24 pages | - | 16 downloads | PDF: 1,743 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Legume Vegetables in Kentucky
1/30/2015 (new)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" (but rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. Proper identification is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during bean and pea production in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter a problem that is not included here. Please contact your county Extension service for assistance. | ID-227
1,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 6,479 words | 37 downloads | PDF: 6,400 kb


2014 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/7/2015 (new)

The 2014 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in three counties in Kentucky, including: Mason, Shelby, and Spencer. | PR-688
web only | 42 pages | 29,201 words | 66 downloads | PDF: 950 kb


Watermelon
12/17/2014 (revised)

Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a warm-season crop in the Cucurbit family, Watermelons are grown in various areas across the state, including: Casey County, Lincoln County, Hart County, Allen County, and Daviess County. Watermelon is the second largest fresh market vegetable produced in the state, with 1,116 acres, and accounts for 16% of the total fresh market vegetable acreage (USDA, 2013). | CCD-CP-125
web only | 4 pages | 1,320 words | - | PDF: 1,100 kb


Understanding Soilless Media Test Results and Their Implications on Nursery and Greenhouse Crop Management
7/17/2014 (new)

Although choosing or formulating media with optimum physical properties (such as pore air space and water holding capacity) for a given production environment and crop plant is important, this publication focuses on the chemical properties of soilless media determined with a laboratory test as conducted through the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service at the Division of Regulatory Services Soil Testing Laboratories. | HO-112
web only | 4 pages | 2,443 words | 36 downloads | PDF: 252 kb


Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos de Solanaceas on Kentucky
7/9/2014 (new)

La identificacion correcta de los patogenos y de insectos plagas, asi como los trastornos nutricionales y fisiologicos e incluso derivas de herbicidas es esencial para determinar el curso apropiado de accion. Las imagenes incluidas en esta guia representan algunas plagas o problemas comunes que los agricultores pueden encontrar cuando se producen cultivos de solanaceas (tomates, pimientos, berenjena y papas) en Kentucky. | ID-172s
1,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 7,500 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 5,600 kb


Shade Tree Decline and Related Problems
7/1/2014 (revised)

Woody plant stress has many causes that might ultimately lead to plant decline. Tree and shrub degeneration is often referred to as a "complex," meaning the condition is usually caused by multiple factors. Typically, one or more primary stresses cause deterioration of plant health, followed by secondary pathogens and/or insects that further decline or destroy plants. Determining causes of decline requires careful examination of plants and growing sites, as well as knowledge of site history. Nevertheless, diagnoses may be difficult, as the original cause(s) of plant stress may be obscure or no longer present. Some of the most common plant stresses are addressed in this publication. A wider range of possible causes of plant stress and decline should be considered during evaluation of woody plant material. | ID-50
web only | 11 pages | 4,025 words | 50 downloads | PDF: 9,000 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Apple in Kentucky
5/7/2014 (new)

The National Integrated Pest Management Network defines IPM as "a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks." One of the key components of IPM is to continually scout and monitor crops to identify problems before they result in significant economic losses. Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during apple production in Kentucky. | ID-219
3,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 5,056 words | 37 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Residential Rain Garden: Design, Construction, Maintenance
5/1/2014 (new)

This publication covers the design, construction, and maintenance of residential ran gardens. Rain gardens are one of several stormwater management practices that homeowners can use to reduce their property's negative impact on water quality and flooding. | HENV-205
web only | 15 pages | 6,021 words | 142 downloads | PDF: 6,000 kb


Plasticulture Strawberries
3/20/2014 (revised)

There is always a market for fresh, local strawberries (Fragaria spp.), and growers able to provide the earliest crop often have the marketing edge. For growers willing to make the investment in time and resources, the annual plasticulture system may allow the grower to have berries about one month sooner than growers using the traditional matted row system. Plasticulture production can either be used as a stand-alone enterprise or as part of a diversified operation. | CCD-CP-16
web only | 3 pages | 1,374 words | - | PDF: 491 kb


Sustainable Production Systems: Principles and Approaches for Optimizing Efficiency in Nursery and Landscape Businesses
3/14/2014 (new)

Publications in the Sustainable Production Systems series discuss ways of pursuing sustainability in nursery production systems. Sustainable businesses are those that yield acceptable returns on investments, conserve natural resources, make positive contributions to the community, and create a workplace culture where employees feel safe, productive, and valued. | HO-110
web only | 17 pages | 9,670 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 5,953 kb


Understanding Irrigation Water Test Results and Their Implications on Nursery and Greenhouse Crop Management
2/6/2014 (new)

The purpose of this fact sheet is to discuss irrigation water quality factors and to present general guidelines for optimal ranges for measured factors in a University of Kentucky water analysis for nursery and greenhouse crop production. | HO-111
web only | 6 pages | 3,971 words | 31 downloads | PDF: 264 kb


2013 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/8/2014 (new)

Variety trials included in this year's publication include: cabbage, asparagus, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, apples, peaches, and grapes. Additional research trials include organic management of cucumber beetles, financial comparison of organic potato integrated pest management systems, and effect of organic fertilizer materials for production of kale. | PR-673
web only | 44 pages | 23,586 words | 72 downloads | PDF: 2,491 kb


Midwest Blueberry Production Guide
7/24/2013 (reprinted)

Blueberries are one of the few fruit crops native to North America. Wild blueberries were utilized by Native Americans for making medicines, dyes, and flavorings, as well as for direct consumption. Once a small-scale crop produced within limited regions, blueberries are now grown throughout the United States and the rest of the world. | ID-210
1,500 printed copies | 58 pages | 28,039 words | 81 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cole Crops in Kentucky
7/22/2013 (new)

Cole crops are important as a group, particularly when all acreage of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts are combined. Spring planted crops may have very different problems associated with them compared to fall crops. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs fill an important role in production of these crops and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed," but not necessarily eliminated, in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-216
3,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 4,491 words | 36 downloads | PDF: 5,300 kb


Landscape Sanitation
7/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home landscape plantings (Figure 1a), resulting in premature leaf drop, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-4
web only | 3 pages | 951 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 644 kb


What's Wrong with My Taxus?
6/5/2013 (revised)

Taxus (yew) is an evergreen shrub commonly found in Kentucky landscapes. Numerous conditions can cause these shrubs to exhibit yellowing and browning symptoms. While diseases and insect pests can result in damage, Taxus troubles are often the result of adverse growing conditions. Pinpointing the specific cause requires a thorough examination of the affected shrub, an investigation of the surrounding area, and knowledge of possible stress factors. | ID-52
web only | 4 pages | 2,010 words | 35 downloads | PDF: 2,300 kb


Leaf Scorch and Winter Drying of Woody Plants
6/1/2013 (new)

Leaf scorch symptoms can develop whenever water needed for growth and health of plant foliage is insufficient. While symptoms are often due to unfavorable environmental conditions, leaf scorch can also result from an infectious disease. Symptoms, possible causes, and management of leaf scorch are discussed below. | PPFS-OR-W-17
web only | 4 pages | 1,587 words | 1 download | PDF: 681 kb


Vegetable and Melon Budgets
5/22/2013 (revised)

The "button" below contain links to each of the 18 vegetable/melon budgets. Click on the desired crop and the link will take you to the sheet for that particular budget. | CCD-BG-10
web only | 0 pages | 0 words | - | PDF: 93 kb


Disease and Insect Control Program for Home Grown Fruit in Kentucky
5/8/2013 (reprinted)

Many homeowners in Kentucky grow a variety of fruits in their garden and are rewarded for their effort. One distinct advantage homeowners have over commercial orchardists is the diverse ecosystem of the home landscape (vegetable gardens, flower and fruit plantings intermixed with turf and landscape plants). Diversity often reduces the spread of insect and disease organisms and tends to keep their populations at lower, more manageable levels. | ID-21
1,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 10,516 words | 126 downloads | PDF: 1,000 kb


Vegetable Cultivars for Kentucky Gardens---2013
5/6/2013 (revised)

Gardening makes sense! Growing your own vegetables makes you feel self-sufficient and provides fresh, healthful food. Your surplus crop can be frozen, canned, or stored in cool, dry locations. To assure gardening success, start by selecting suitable vegetable cultivars. Planting resistant or tolerant varieties is one of the most effective ways for the home gardener to avoid destructive vegetable diseases. | ID-133
web only | 8 pages | 814 words | 124 downloads | PDF: 425 kb


Mulching with Large Round Bales between Plastic-covered Beds
4/26/2013 (new)

Large round bales lend themselves very well to the application of mulching rows of vegetables because the bales can be unrolled to peel off layers that are about the right thickness for mulch. An innovative implement that offsets the bale so that it can be unrolled between the rows while the tractor straddles the row can make the practice of mulching with round bales considerably more efficient. | ID-214
250 printed copies | 6 pages | 3,335 words | 34 downloads | PDF: 2,400 kb


Landscaping Septic Systems with Native Plants
2/15/2013 (new)

Septic system components sometimes have unsightly aboveground pipes, risers, ventilation systems, or large mounds. Homeowners can improve the appearance of these functional features through site design and, in particular, plant material selection. | HENV-508
web only | 6 pages | 2,782 words | 83 downloads | PDF: 1,384 kb


Sustainable Production Systems: Efficient Wholesale Nursery Layout
1/31/2013 (new)

This publication provides the framework for planning and implementing efficient wholesale nursery layout. Concepts and ideas presented here are applicable to new construction or the modification of an existing nursery. A basic approach toward creating efficient systems will be discussed as well as common nursery activities that may require consideration during the planning stages. Functional areas will be defined, and a framework for understanding the relationships between these functional areas will be presented. | HO-109
web only | 10 pages | 7,699 words | 51 downloads | PDF: 4,000 kb


2012 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/6/2012 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2012 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and several demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in more than 15 counties in Kentucky. Research was conducted by faculty and staff from several departments within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture including: Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Agricultural Economics. This report also includes collaborative research projects conducted with faculty and staff at Kentucky State University. | PR-656
web only | 47 pages | 21,679 words | 53 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Selecting and Planting Wody Ornamental Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 21
8/6/2012 (new)

Woody ornamental plants are key components of a well-designed landscape. Landscape plantings divide and define areas, add aesthetic and psychological benefits, and increase a property's environmental and economic values. | HO-107
web only | 18 pages | 9,171 words | 97 downloads | PDF: 880 kb


Mulch Myths
8/6/2012 (new)

Mulch is one of the essentials of good landscaping. It can be used to protect trees, suppress weeds, fertilize plants and retain soil moisture. Like many traditional practices, the use of mulch has some myths attached to it. You can improve the look of your landscape as well as the health of your plants and trees by learning the facts--and discarding the myths--about mulch. | HO-106
web only | 2 pages | 414 words | 133 downloads | PDF: 2,700 kb


Trees, Turf, and People
8/6/2012 (new)

The shade trees and fruit trees that we treasure in our landscapes were originally adapted to growing in forests in close association with other trees. In the forest they can remain small for many years. As soon as there is an opening in the canopy allowing light to reach the forest floor they grow rapidly. This great height allows trees to assume a place of dominance over other plants; their trunks lift their leaves high into the air, allowing them to intercept the maximum amount of sunlight before it reaches other plants. Thus, trees grow tall and provide us with their much-appreciated shade. | ID-203
web only | 4 pages | 2,432 words | 43 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


Organic Gardening: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 18
5/7/2012 (new)

Organic gardening offers the gardener many benefits--a safe, low-chemical gardening environment, produce free from synthetic pesticide residues, and gardens that can increase in fertility and natural pest control over time. However, reaping the benefits of organic management requires planning, observation, and thinking about the garden as an interconnected system of soils, plants, pests, and beneficial organisms. | HO-100
web only | 12 pages | 5,684 words | 93 downloads | PDF: 615 kb


Roses
3/27/2012 (revised)

Roses have many landscape uses. They can be placed as accent plants or used to form hedges or ground covers. They offer a rainbow of colors and a variety of forms and fragrances, and their sizes range from miniatures to tall climbing plants. Roses may be grown under many climatic and soil conditions and, with care, thrive and produce flowers for many years. | ID-118
2,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 7,927 words | 66 downloads | PDF: 3,331 kb


Your Yard and Water Quality: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 11
3/26/2012 (new)

We generally view gardening as a wholesome activity that enhances our environment. But pesticides, fertilizers, and erosion from gardens and landscapes can contaminate lakes, streams, rivers, oceans, and groundwater. Since the quality of our water resources affects our quality of life, we must learn how gardening practices can contribute to water contamination and how to reduce the threat to water quality. | ID-201
web only | 8 pages | 2,589 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 410 kb


Woody Plant Disease Control Guide for Kentucky
3/22/2012 (revised)

Management of woody plant diseases usually combines preventative and curative practices, including a focus on plant health, sanitation, cultivar selection, and pesticides. | ID-88
web only | 16 pages | 7,345 words | 35 downloads | PDF: 3,700 kb


Landscape Design: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 17
3/12/2012 (new)

This chapter is not meant to define the art of landscape design but rather to help you take a realistic approach to landscape planning. Your end design should meet your needs and incorporate principles of sustainability into an evolving landscape. | HO-105
web only | 20 pages | 5,654 words | 119 downloads | PDF: 1,400 kb


Growing Tree Fruits: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 16
3/12/2012 (new)

Growing tree fruits and/or nuts can provide a great deal of satisfaction, but it takes a commitment to care for your trees year-round. | HO-104
web only | 14 pages | 4,766 words | 122 downloads | PDF: 900 kb


Indoor Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 14
3/12/2012 (new)

A houseplant is simply an outdoor plant that is grown indoors. Not all plants are suitable for indoor culture. Some require environmental conditions that are impossible to duplicate indoors. Others adapt to indoor culture if their minimum growth requirements are provided. The key to successful indoor plant culture is to select plants that are adaptable to the conditions in your home. | HO-103
web only | 14 pages | 5,850 words | 60 downloads | PDF: 950 kb


Annual and Perennial Flowers: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 13
3/12/2012 (new)

Can you imagine a world without flowers? Their textures, colors, scents, and forms inspire gardeners, artists, and writers. The desire to grow flowers often motivates novices to take up gardening and moves experienced gardeners to become flower specialists. Annuals, biennials, and herbaceous perennials offer variety and interest to all styles of gardens. | HO-102
web only | 14 pages | 5,317 words | 97 downloads | PDF: 1,100 kb


Care of Woody Plants: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 12
3/12/2012 (new)

To prune or not to prune? This is a question that gardeners often faces gardeners. Most feel they ought to prune but are not sure why or how. Pruning is an accepted practice in orchards and frequently is done in rose gardens, but it is used haphazardly elsewhere. Ornamentals are most often pruned only when a shrub or tree begins to encroach on its neighbors, a walkway, or a building. | HO-101
web only | 20 pages | 7,419 words | 55 downloads | PDF: 1,900 kb


Sweetpotato Production for Kentucky
2/21/2012 (new)

Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a member of the morningglory or Convolvulaceae family. Sweetpotatoes have their origins in tropical America, with early remains having been found in Panama, Peru and Mexico. A perennial plant in their native regions, they are typically killed by frost when grown in a temperate climate. Sweetpotatoes are true roots and not tubers as is the case with the Irish Potato (Solanum tuberosum). Because they are true roots they will continue to grow and enlarge as long as the plant continues to grow. | ID-195
500 printed copies | 16 pages | 6,240 words | 45 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Recognizing Trees of Significance
1/26/2012 (new)

Trees are important to people. They represent safety, beauty, and refuge. One way we show our regard for one of the most important elements of the human environment is to protect them. Protection begins with public recognition of value. It is not possible or desirable to protect all trees, but those associated with a greater perceived value must be recognized for their unique characteristics. These are the "Trees of Significance," trees that for a variety of reasons are special. | HO-95
web only | 3 pages | 2,162 words | 67 downloads | PDF: 240 kb


Trees with Minimal Insect and Disease Problems for Kentucky Landscapes
1/26/2012 (new)

Healthy, attractive landscapes without damaging insects and diseases are the primary goal for gardeners and landscape managers. Using Best Management Practices (BMP) and making appropriate plant selections will help to insure that landscapes start out healthy and remain healthy. Healthy landscapes do not require an over-reliance on environmentally damaging pesticides. | HO-94
web only | 6 pages | 2,473 words | 67 downloads | PDF: 260 kb


Trees and Compacted Soils
1/26/2012 (new)

Soils become compacted as a result of traffic. Compaction is common in urban areas and results from construction equipment and foot traffic. Soil is more likely to become compacted when the soil is wet than when it is excessively dry. Soil compaction is permanent, at least when viewed in reference to a human life span. Protecting the soil from becoming compacted is much easier than dealing with the negative impact of compaction on plant growth and health. | HO-93
web only | 2 pages | 1,558 words | 43 downloads | PDF: 180 kb


Botanical Diversity in the Landscape
1/26/2012 (new)

Diversity and sustainability are terms bantered about without much consideration of their relationship and value to human welfare. How much botanical diversity in landscapes is enough? What type of diversity is important? There are no simple formulas or templates for your landscape, but the opportunity to experiment and be creative makes gardening fun. Failures can always be composted. | HO-92
web only | 2 pages | 972 words | 35 downloads | PDF: 179 kb


Planting Balled and Burlapped Trees and Shrubs in Your Landscape
1/26/2012 (new)

Many landscape plants are installed as balled and burlapped (B&B) specimens. This method, along with container grown and bare root, is one of three major ways we transplant trees and shrubs from nurseries to our landscapes. The keys to quick reestablishment and decades of satisfaction are following proven techniques in installation and providing proper care after transplanting. | HO-91
web only | 2 pages | 2,094 words | 45 downloads | PDF: 187 kb


2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2011 (new)

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-626
web only | 53 pages | 26,604 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 1,391 kb


Plant Material Shipments: Federal and State Plant Protection Regulations Relevant to Your Nursery Business
12/6/2011 (new)

It is critical that individuals transporting plant materials as well as state and federal agencies that regulate shipments remain diligent in preventing movement of harmful pests. This publication covers some of the regulations that may apply to nursery businesses' shipping activities. | HO-99
web only | 4 pages | 2,077 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 568 kb


Plant Propagation: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 3
10/12/2011 (new)

Sexual propagation involves the union of the pollen (male) with the egg (female) to produce a seed. The seed is made up of three parts: the outer seed coat, which protects the seed; the endosperm, which is a food reserve; and the embryo, which is the young plant itself. When a seed is mature and put in a favorable environment, it will germinate, or begin active growth. In this section, seed germination and transplanting of seeds are discussed. | HO-98
web only | 16 pages | 8,025 words | 71 downloads | PDF: 1,150 kb


Plant Identification: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 2
10/12/2011 (new)

The rules of plant identification and nomenclature (naming) may seem complex and more trouble than they are worth, but knowing the basic rules and applying them to everyday gardening leads to a better understanding of plants and how they are classified. | HO-97
web only | 4 pages | 1,764 words | 88 downloads | PDF: 320 kb


Composting: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 5
10/12/2011 (new)

Gardeners have long made and used compost to improve garden soil. Composting plant and vegetable matter is an important way to reduce the waste burned or dumped in landfills. Yard wastes and vegetable scraps can make up as much as 20 percent of household garbage. Composting effectively recycles that waste into valuable organic matter that can be used as soil amendments. | ID-192
web only | 8 pages | 4,200 words | 66 downloads | PDF: 470 kb


Soybean Cyst Nematode: A Potential Problem for Nursuries
10/4/2011 (revised)

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most serious disease pest of soybean in the United States (and Kentucky) and results in an estimated $1 billion in losses annually. SCN is a microscopic roundworm (Heterodera glycines) that feeds on root of soybean and reduces its capacity to absorb water and nutrients. Yield losses of 30% or more are common where SCN-susceptible soybean varieties are grown and SCN levels are high. SCN was first discovered in Kentucky in 1957 in Fulton County but is now found in every Kentucky county in which soybean is grown commercially. | ID-110
web only | 4 pages | 1,256 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 368 kb


Climate Change: A Brief Summary for Kentucky Extension Agents
9/20/2011 (new)

Nearly all climate science experts agree that global warming is occurring and that it is caused primarily by human activity. Regardless of what you may read on blogs or in the media, there is no meaningful scientific controversy on these points. The future impacts of global warming are difficult to predict, but the changes caused by greenhouse gases are expected to increasingly affect Kentucky agriculture. | ID-191
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,975 words | 50 downloads | PDF: 250 kb


Basic Botany: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 1
8/15/2011 (new)

Many plants are familiar to us, and we can identify and appreciate them based on their external structure. However, their internal structure and function often are overlooked. Understanding how plants grow and develop helps us capitalize on their usefulness and make them part of our everyday lives. | HO-96
web only | 30 pages | 12,440 words | 73 downloads | PDF: 3,725 kb


Life Cycle Assessment: Implications for the Green Industry
6/2/2011 (new)

The purpose of this circular is to give green industry leaders and business managers a better understanding of the terms and processes used to judge the impact of various production system components and practices. | HO-90
web only | 4 pages | 3,684 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 194 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Pests of Solanaceous Crops in Kentucky
4/29/2011 (revised)

Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter when producing solanaceous crops (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and potatoes) in Kentucky. | ID-172
3,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 7,500 words | 35 downloads | PDF: 2,000 kb


Rootstocks for Kentucky Fruit Trees
3/28/2011 (revised)

Most fruit trees that can be grown in Kentucky do not come true from seed. For example, a tree grown from a Golden Delicious apple seed will produce an apple tree, but the fruit will have different characteristics than Golden Delicious in color, taste, and shape. This is why fruit trees are reproduced by asexual propagation, such as budding and grafting. | HO-82
web only | 6 pages | 3,890 words | 48 downloads | PDF: 215 kb


2010 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
1/28/2011 (new)

The UK Nursery and Landscape Program coordinates the efforts of faculty, staff, and students in several departments within the College of Agriculture tor the benefit of the Kentucky nursery and landscape industry. | PR-621
web only | 29 pages | 15,271 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 629 kb


2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2010 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky. | PR-608
1,000 printed copies | 70 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Sweet Corn in Kentucky
11/3/2010 (reprinted)

In terms of acreage, sweet corn is the largest commercial vegetable crop grown in Kentucky. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs have played an important role in its production and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" but not necessarily eliminated in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-184
4,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 5,437 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 1,054 kb


Peach Cultivar Performance
6/14/2010 (revised)

The commercial success of a peach orchard depends largely on selecting cultivars that will perform reliably and meet market needs. Although many fruit and tree characteristics are presented in this report, the final cultivar selection should be determined by the grower. A grower may be influenced by soil type, local climate, or marketing methods and prefer a cultivar that is not a general favorite. Growers should have test plots of two to four trees of new cultivars to help them judge the performance in their orchard. | HO-6
web only | 6 pages | - | 23 downloads | PDF: 275 kb


Nut Tree Growing in Kentucky
4/22/2010 (revised)

Kentucky is generally well suited for growing nut trees. Northern pecans, black walnuts, heartnuts, hickory nuts, hardy Persian walnuts (Carpathian strain), American hazelnuts, and Chinese chestnuts all grow well in the state. Although most nut trees are grown by hobbyists and backyard gardeners, several varieties appear to have potential for commercial production, particularly some of the USDA pecan selections and some Chinese chestnut varieties. | ID-77
web only | 24 pages | - | 50 downloads | PDF: 680 kb


2009 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
1/7/2010 (new)

The 2009 report has been organized according to our primary areas of emphasis: production and economics, pest management, and plant evaluation. These areas reflect stated industry needs, expertise available at UK, and the nature of research projects around the world that generate information applicable to Kentucky. | PR-602
1,000 printed copies | 24 pages | - | 7 downloads | PDF: 1,258 kb


2009 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/11/2009 (new)

The 2009 Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report includes results for more than 45 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 19 counties in Kentucky. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools that they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-603
1,000 printed copies | 56 pages | - | 14 downloads | PDF: 850 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cucurbit Crops in Kentucky
7/27/2009 (revised)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed to reduce their negative impact on the crop, although pests are rarely eliminated. | ID-91
5,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 6,729 words | 28 downloads | PDF: 1,863 kb


2008 Kentucky Blackberry Cost and Return Estimates
7/14/2009 (revised)

Potential producers should realize that while thornless semi-erect varieties produce superior economic returns, thorny and thornless erect varieties may hold some marketing advantages that can command superior prices and result in better returns than those estimated using these standard assumptions. | ID-149
750 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 13 downloads | PDF: 265 kb


2008 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/1/2008 (new)

| PR-572
1,100 printed copies | 72 pages | - | 11 downloads | PDF: 800 kb


2008 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
12/1/2008 (new)

| PR-571
1,100 printed copies | 30 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,476 kb


Controlled Water Table Irrigation of Container Crops
10/31/2008 (new)

| HO-84
web only | 18 pages | - | 22 downloads | PDF: 3,000 kb


Ornamental Corn Production
7/10/2008 (revised)

| HO-81
1,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 27 downloads | PDF: 1,234 kb


Commercial Asparagus Production
2/13/2008 (revised)

| HO-66
web only | 8 pages | - | 26 downloads | PDF: 875 kb


2007 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
11/29/2007 (new)

| PR-555
1,000 printed copies | 92 pages | - | 8 downloads | PDF: 1,400 kb


2007 Nursery and Landscape Research Report
11/26/2007 (new)

| PR-554
1,100 printed copies | 48 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,400 kb


Vineyard Site Selection in Kentucky Based on Climate and Soil Properties
10/5/2007 (new)

| HO-87
2,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 290 kb


Viticultural Regions and Suggested Cultivars in Kentucky
9/14/2007 (new)

| HO-88
2,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 37 downloads | PDF: 1,100 kb


Crop Estimation in Vineyards
8/15/2007 (new)

| HO-86
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 19 downloads | PDF: 307 kb


Growing Peaches in Kentucky
3/30/2007 (revised)

| HO-57
1,500 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 70 downloads | PDF: 978 kb


Strawberry Production in Kentucky
2/25/2007 (revised)

| HO-16
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 63 downloads | PDF: 340 kb


Dry Pesticide Rates for Hand-Held Sprayers
2/21/2007 (new)

| HO-83
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 18 downloads | PDF: 166 kb


Honeyvine Milkweed Control in Tree Fruits, Small Fruits, and Grapes
1/19/2007 (new)

| HO-85
100 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 24 downloads | PDF: 320 kb


Ornamental Gourd Production in Kentucky
1/3/2007 (revised)

| ID-119
2,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 21 downloads | PDF: 281 kb


2006 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-538
1,100 printed copies | 82 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,337 kb


2006 Nursery and Landscape Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-537
1,200 printed copies | 46 pages | - | - | PDF: 2,115 kb


Orange Rust of Brambles
9/1/2006 (new)

Orange rust is a disease caused by one of two very similar fungi, Gymnoconia nitens in the Southeast, and Arthuriomyces peckianus in the Midwest. Both fungi, causing the same symptoms, may be active in Kentucky. In Kentucky, orange rust is severe on some wild and cultivated thorny blackberries. It infects black and purple raspberries and thornless blackberries somewhat, but is not known to infect red raspberries. | PPFS-FR-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 657 words | 1 download | PDF: 232 kb


Preserving Flowers and Foliage
3/8/2006 (revised)

| HO-70
web only | 6 pages | - | 27 downloads | PDF: 298 kb


2005 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/30/2005 (new)

| PR-521
1,100 printed copies | 98 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,555 kb


2005 Nursery and Landscape Report
12/30/2005 (new)

| PR-520
1,200 printed copies | 46 pages | - | - | PDF: 5,168 kb


Culinary Herbs
12/1/2005 (reprinted)

| HO-74
5,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 83 downloads | PDF: 312 kb


Home Composting: A Guide to Managing Organic Wastes
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-75
web only | 4 pages | - | 61 downloads | PDF: 263 kb


Propagating Plants in and Around the Home
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-67
web only | 8 pages | - | 56 downloads | PDF: 302 kb


Landscape Design with Plants: Creating Outdoor Rooms
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-62
web only | 16 pages | - | 53 downloads | PDF: 1,415 kb


Starting Plants from Seed at Home
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-56
web only | - | - | 27 downloads | HTML: 20 kb


Reproducing Fruit Trees by Graftage Budding and Grafting
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-39
web only | 8 pages | - | 32 downloads | PDF: 789 kb


Growing Blackberries and Raspberries in Kentucky
11/1/2005 (revised)

| HO-15
web only | 12 pages | - | 90 downloads | PDF: 325 kb


Bt Basics for Vegetable Integrated Pest Management
8/1/2005 (new)

| ID-156
2,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 18 downloads | PDF: 655 kb


Growers' Guide to Bt
8/1/2005 (new)

| ID-156A
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 21 downloads | PDF: 478 kb


2004 Nursery and Landscape Report
12/20/2004 (new)

| PR-502
1,200 printed copies | 46 pages | - | - | PDF: 2,376 kb


2004 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2004 (new)

| PR-504
1,100 printed copies | 74 pages | - | 8 downloads | PDF: 1,899 kb


Blackberry Rosette (Double Blossom)
7/1/2004 (revised)

Rosette disease, caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi, is a serious and destructive disease of blackberries in most parts of Kentucky. In some locations, growers have been forced out of growing blackberries because of rosette disease. | PPFS-FR-S-3
web only | 2 pages | 516 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 208 kb


2003 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2003 (new)

| PR-488
1,100 printed copies | - | - | - | HTML: 1 kb


2003 Nursery and Landscape Report
12/5/2003 (new)

| PR-486
1,200 printed copies | 42 pages | - | - | PDF: 474 kb


Growing Highbush Blueberries in Kentucky
6/15/2003 (reprinted)

| HO-60
200 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 66 downloads | PDF: 403 kb


2002 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/3/2003 (new)

| PR-470
1,000 printed copies | 65 pages | - | - | PDF: 2,400 kb


2002 Nursery and Landscape Report
1/3/2003 (new)

| PR-468
1,200 printed copies | 42 pages | - | - | PDF: 1,900 kb


4-H Vegetable Gardening Project
12/15/2002 (reprinted)

A vegetable garden can be both enjoyable and productive. Your goal may be to raise some or all of the vegetables for your family, or you may want to produce enough fresh vegetables to sell. | 4BC-07PA
500 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 236 downloads | PDF: 736 kb


Annual Flowers
5/30/2002 (reprinted)

| HO-65
5,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 53 downloads | PDF: 67 kb


Perennials for Shady Locations
4/15/2002 (reprinted)

| HO-77
5,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 95 downloads | PDF: 81 kb


Perennials for Sunny Locations
4/15/2002 (reprinted)

| HO-76
5,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 77 downloads | PDF: 98 kb


2001 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/4/2002 (new)

| PR-452
1,100 printed copies | 60 pages | - | - | PDF: 437 kb


2001 UK Nursery and Landscape Program
12/1/2001 (new)

| PR-450
web only | 40 pages | - | - | PDF: 369 kb


Medicinal Herb Seed and Root Sources for Planting in Kentucky
9/15/2001 (revised)

| HO-73
5,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 40 downloads | PDF: 128 kb


Total Quality Assurance Apple Production: Best Management Practices
5/1/2001 (new)

| ID-137
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 32 downloads | PDF: 271 kb


Principles of Home Landscape Fertilizing
3/1/2001 (revised)

| ID-72
4,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 53 downloads | PDF: 183 kb


2000 UK Nursery and Landscape Program
1/1/2001 (new)

| PR-437
1,800 printed copies | 38 pages | - | - | PDF: 574 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report 2000
12/3/2000 (new)

| PR-436
1,100 printed copies | 57 pages | - | - | PDF: 768 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crop Research Report 1999
12/31/1999 (new)

| PR-423
750 printed copies | 43 pages | - | - | PDF: 712 kb


Nursery and Landscape Program: 1999 Research Report
12/31/1999 (new)

| PR-422
web only | 33 pages | - | - | PDF: 689 kb


The Flowering Crabapple
10/1/1999 (revised)

| ID-68
5,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 331 kb


2000 Kentucky Beef Cattle Research Report
10/1/1999 (new)

| PR-417
700 printed copies | - | - | 1 download | HTML: 4 kb


Marketing Options for Commercial Vegetable Growers
6/30/1999 (reprinted)

| ID-134
3,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 9 downloads | PDF: 598 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Program: 1998 Research Report
12/1/1998 (new)

The emphases in our research program reflect industry-defined needs, expertise available at UK, and the nature of research projects around the world generating information applicable to Kentucky. Although the purpose of this publication is to report research results, the report also highlights our Extension program and Undergraduate and Graduate degree programs that address the needs of the horticultural industries. | PR-410
web only | 46 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 335 kb


Nursery and Landscape Program: 1998 Research Report
12/1/1998 (new)

| PR-409
web only | 44 pages | - | - | PDF: 318 kb


Midwest Tree Fruit Pest Management Handbook
11/1/1998 (new)

| ID-93
5,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 3 kb


Winter Cover Crops for Kentucky Gardens and Fields
6/15/1998 (revised)

| ID-113
3,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 41 downloads | PDF: 81 kb


Basics for Heating & Cooling Greenhouses
4/1/1998 (reprinted)

| ID-131
1,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 38 downloads | PDF: 637 kb


Nursery and Landscape Program: 1997 Research Report
1/1/1998 (new)

| SR-97-1
1,500 printed copies | 40 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 463 kb


Growing Grapes in Kentucky
7/1/1997 (reprinted)

| ID-126
3,000 printed copies | 24 pages | - | 68 downloads | PDF: 238 kb


Spring, Summer and Fall Bulbs
3/1/1997 (reprinted)

| HO-80
5,000 printed copies | 9 pages | - | 57 downloads | PDF: 79 kb


The Flowering Dogwood
3/1/1997 (revised)

| ID-67
3,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 37 downloads | PDF: 262 kb


Nursery and Landscape Program: 1996 Research Report
1/1/1997 (new)

| SR-96-1
1,500 printed copies | 48 pages | - | 7 downloads | PDF: 518 kb


Making a Terrarium
2/18/1996 (reprinted)

A small garden in a glass container is easy to make and to care for. Many different containers and plants can be used--whatever is available to you. In addition to plants, you can add rocks, shells, or pieces of bark to create miniature scenes. This indoor gardening activity can give pleasure to you and your family or friends during the winter when few green plants or colorful flowers can be found outdoors. | 4BE-15PO
web only | 4 pages | - | 218 downloads | PDF: 162 kb


Trees Shrubs Ground Covers and Vines Suitable for Kentucky Landscapes
4/1/1994 (reprinted)

| HO-61
4,000 printed copies | 20 pages | - | 65 downloads | PDF: 425 kb


Ground Covers for Ky Landscapes
12/1/1993 (reprinted)

| HO-78
3,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 42 downloads | PDF: 182 kb


Ornamental Grasses for Kentucky Landscapes
7/1/1993 (reprinted)

| HO-79
3,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 53 downloads | PDF: 893 kb


Understanding Produce Marketing for Kentucky's Direct Markets
8/1/1991 (new)

| ID-107
2,000 printed copies | - | - | 8 downloads | HTML: 19 kb


Promotion and Advertising for Kentucky's Direct Markets
8/1/1991 (new)

| ID-106
3,000 printed copies | - | - | 6 downloads | HTML: 43 kb


Low Maintenance Annual Flowers for Kentucky Gardens
6/1/1990 (revised)

| HO-47
20,000 printed copies | - | - | 23 downloads | HTML: 22 kb


Geology Project: Collecting Rocks, Minerals, and Fossils
8/10/1988 (reprinted)

| 4DB-01PO
500 printed copies | 28 pages | - | 118 downloads | PDF: 905 kb


Transplanting Trees and Shrubs
1/1/1988 (reprinted)

| ID-80
10,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 46 downloads | PDF: 1,000 kb


Geraniums for Kentucky Gardens
6/1/1987 (reprinted)

| HO-26
2,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 12 kb


Topping Is Hazardous to Your Tree's Health
5/1/1986 (reprinted)

| ID-55
2,000 printed copies | 3 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 200 kb


Tulips and Their Care
5/1/1984 (reprinted)

| HO-35
2,000 printed copies | - | - | 7 downloads | HTML: 9 kb


Flowering Plants for Homes and Offices
2/1/1983 (new)

| HO-51
15,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 24 kb


Pruning Landscape Shrubs
8/1/1982 (reprinted)

| HO-59
4,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 56 downloads | PDF: 755 kb


Guidelines for Choosing Hedges for Kentucky Yards
7/1/1982 (reprinted)

| HO-55
1,000 printed copies | - | - | 14 downloads | HTML: 33 kb


Exhibiting and Judging Vegetables
3/9/1982 (reprinted)

| 4BC-08PO
500 printed copies | 16 pages | - | 98 downloads | PDF: 434 kb


Large Plants for Homes and Offices
2/1/1981 (reprinted)

| HO-52
10,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 24 kb


Pruning Landscape Trees
11/1/1979 (reprinted)

| HO-45
5,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 32 downloads | PDF: 1,992 kb


Forcing Spring Flowering Bulbs
8/1/1975 (reprinted)

| 4BE-12PO
500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 82 downloads | PDF: 3,600 kb


4-H Indoor Gardening Project: Making an Herb Garden Record Sheet
10/9/1974 (reprinted)

A worksheet for recording information about your herb garden project. | 4BC-05RO
1,500 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 154 downloads | PDF: 85 kb