University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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College publications are given 2-part "pub numbers" that are used to identify them. The first part (the prefix) is a set of letters that indicates which series the document belongs to. A series is a grouping of documents that share similar content.

The second part of the pub number is just a sequential number.

Series: General Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet



Relative Effectiveness of Various Chemicals for Disease Control of Ornamental Plants
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included here as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and mention or listing of commercial products does not imply endorsement nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current STATE regulations and conforms to the product label. Examine a current product label before applying any chemical. For assistance, contact your county Cooperative Extension agent. | PPFS-GEN-13
web only | 3 pages | 2,173 words | 9 downloads | PDF: 388 kb


Simplified Fungicide Guide for Backyard Fruit
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

This fungicide spray guide is intended as a supplement to the more detailed spray schedule available in Disease and Insect Control Programs for Homegrown Fruit in Kentucky, Including Organic Alternatives, ID-21. | PPFS-GEN-8
web only | 2 pages | 554 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 431 kb


Homeowner's Guide to Fungicides
4/1/2016 (minor revision)

Diseases in home gardens, orchards, and landscapes do not always cause total losses, but they can be serious problems if left unmanaged. As a rule, chemicals are not recommended as the only means of disease control for homeowners. Cultural practices such as sanitation, irrigation management, attention to plant health, rotation, and selection of disease-resistant varieties are usually enough to control diseases. Chemicals may be required, though, and should be used as a supplement to good management practices. | PPFS-GEN-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,312 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 491 kb


Considerations for Diagnosis of Ornamentals in the Landscape
3/1/2016 (new)

Diagnosing plant problems can be challenging. A site visit can provide the information necessary for a complete and accurate diagnosis. However, once on-site, it is important to know how to proceed. The following guidelines are intended to assist in the process of gathering pertinent information and determining a possible cause. Often abiotic conditions such as environment, mechanical damage, or living organisms like insects or wildlife may be to blame. Should the field site diagnosis be inconclusive and samples need to be submitted to the UK Plant Diagnostic Laboratories, the information gathered here can provide valuable supplementary information. | PPFS-GEN-15
web only | 6 pages | 1,109 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 3,377 kb


Don't Eat Those Wild Mushrooms
2/1/2016 (new)

Mushrooms are strange and wonderful things--some are beautiful, some are ugly, some are delicious, and some are deadly. Mushroom hunting is a fun and rewarding hobby that can turn a hike through local woods into a puzzle-solving adventure. Many people are drawn to mushroom hunting and the potential to forage for food. Unfortunately, there is a dark side to mushroom foraging: poisoning. Each year, wild mushrooms lead to numerous illnesses and even a few deaths. | PPFS-GEN-14
web only | 5 pages | 1,611 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 1,283 kb


Root-knot Nematode in Commercial and Residential Crops
5/1/2014 (new)

Root-knot nematode (RKN) is a soil-dwelling microscopic roundworm. This nematode is parasitic on numerous plants, including vegetables, fruits, field crops, ornamentals, and common weeds. RKN can occur in commercial and homeowner plantings. Frequently, the nematode interacts with other plant pathogens to form a disease complex in which the resulting disease is much more severe than that caused by either component alone. Root-knot nematode is particularly serious when high populations are allowed to build up due to continuous replanting of susceptible plants on the same site. | PPFS-GEN-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,619 words | 1 download | PDF: 917 kb


Diagnosis of "No Disease"
3/1/2014 (new)

Extension Agents and growers may occasionally receive diagnostic reports from the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory that indicate "no disease was found." One or both of the following explanations may account for the diagnosis of "No Disease." | PPFS-GEN-11
web only | 3 pages | 916 words | 1 download | PDF: 867 kb


Submitting Plant Specimens for Disease Diagnosis
3/1/2014 (new)

Diagnosis of plant diseases is one of the many ways that the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and UK Cooperative Extension serve the citizens of Kentucky. This publication is designed to help growers collect and submit the best plant samples for an accurate diagnosis. | PPFS-GEN-9
web only | 7 pages | 872 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 2,312 kb


Fruit, Orchard, and Vineyard Sanitation
8/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home fruit plantings, resulting in premature leaf drop, fruit decay, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-5
web only | 3 pages | 919 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 723 kb


Landscape Sanitation
7/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home landscape plantings (Figure 1a), resulting in premature leaf drop, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-4
web only | 3 pages | 951 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 644 kb


Damping-off of Vegetables and Herbaceous Ornamentals
2/1/2012 (new)

Damping-off can occur on any herbaceous crop grown from seed, including vegetables, ornamentals, and field crops. Seeds, seedlings, and young plants may be affected, resulting in poor stands in home gardens, greenhouses, and commercial fields. Losses to damping-off can be severe, especially when cool, wet weather prevails at seeding or seed emergence. | PPFS-GEN-3
web only | 2 pages | 622 words | 1 download | PDF: 288 kb


Foliar Fungicide Use in Corn and Soybeans
10/1/2011 (new)

Interest in the use of foliar fungicides for corn and soybean has expanded dramatically in the U.S. over the past few years, resulting in a major change in how these crops are being produced on many farms. Until recently, foliar fungicides for soybeans and corn were reserved for seed production fields to protect seed quality in very specific circumstances or for specialty crops. Applications for the purpose of protecting crop yield were rarely economical. However, the current trend in Kentucky, as well as many other corn/soybean producing states, is towards an increased use of foliar fungicides on these crops as a means of maximizing yields. | PPFS-GEN-12
web only | 9 pages | 3,829 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,093 kb


Slime Mold, Lichens, and Sooty Mold Problems on Plants
8/1/2006 (minor revision)

Slime molds are amoeba-like organisms which feed on bacteria and yeasts in the soil. During cloudy, humid weather these molds grow out of the soil and creep onto whatever is available. Turfgrass, weeds, strawberries, bedded flowers, and ground covers, as well as mulches, sidewalks and driveways may become covered with masses of gray, yellowish or black dusty spores. | PPFS-GEN-6
web only | 2 pages | 583 words | 1 download | PDF: 208 kb


Powdery Mildew
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Powdery mildew may affect numerous ornamentals, fruits, vegetables, and agronomic crops. In Kentucky, mildew diseases are most commonly observed on apple, begonia, crabapple, cherry, dogwood, lilac, phlox, pin oak, rose, sycamore, tuliptree, turfgrass, zinnia, squash, pumpkin, cantaloupe, wheat and barley. | PPFS-GEN-2
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 240 kb


Crown Gall
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Crown gall can affect a wide range of crops, including woody ornamentals, tree fruits and small fruits. Some vegetable and herbaceous ornamentals are also susceptible but these crops are less commonly affected. | PPFS-GEN-1
web only | 2 pages | 593 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 210 kb