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beef cattle


ID-262

Considerations for Utilizing Frozen Small Grains for Forage

12/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Carrie Knott, Chris Teutsch, Katherine VanValin

Once wheat and other small grains adapt to cooler weather in the fall, they are relatively tolerant of cold temperatures and freeze injury. Frost injury in the spring normally occurs when February and March are unusually warm and small grains initiate growth earlier than normal or from an unusually late frost event. Freezing temperatures during sensitive growth stages can significantly impact grain yield. In some cases, the impact on yield can be moderate to severe.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, farm crops, grain crops, livestock, nutrition and health, small grains
Size: 429 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-156

Using a Kit to Set up a Cattle Scale System under a Squeeze Chute

10/23/2020 (new)
Authors: Joshua Jackson

On cattle operations, the use of a scale system to weigh animals is vital to the proper administration of health products such as dewormers and antibiotics, and for making management decisions. A scale system mounted to a chute allows animals to be securely restrained for measuring weights accurately and minimally impacts cattle flow through the working facilities. Excitable animals can be properly restrained and, with their movement limited, cattle can be weighed accurately.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 6.83 mb
Pages: 9



ID-264

Feeding Corn Silage to Beef Cattle

9/29/2020 (new)
Authors: Donna Amaral-Phillips, Greg Halich, Chad Lee, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Katherine VanValin

Kentucky is in the upper transition zone which allows for the growth of warm- and cool-season forages. Corn, a warm season grass, grows well in the state and may be harvested for either grain or silage. Corn harvested as silage can be an economical alternative for beef cattle. Implementing sound management strategies and determining the nutrient content to balance rations will allow for successful feeding of corn silage to beef cattle.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 690 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-153

How Understanding and Managing Soil Organic Matter Can Improve Beef Cattle Production

8/6/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Steve Higgins

Beef cattle production is directly affected by soils, but active soil management is limited. Most producers' soil management decisions are limited to submitting a soil sample, getting the analysis back, and then applying the tons of fertilizer or lime recommended at the bottom of the sheet. Meanwhile, producers request assistance to reduce or eliminate mud, weeds, gully erosion, and compaction (if they have identified compacted ground). Occasionally, producers don't have enough forage or hay to get cattle through drought or winter because of low forage production. These issues may have little to do with soil fertility but instead be directly related to soil properties.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, soil and land
Size: 143 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-154

Land and Water Use Planning Applied to a Pasture-based Beef Operation

8/6/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

A typical cow-calf grazing operation needs to feed and water cattle on a daily basis. Ideally, this is accomplished by rotating cattle from field to field and providing them with a convenient source of water to drink. Cattle operations can better manage cattle when facilities are designed to meet the needs of cattle and the producer. Land use-planning can increase production and reduce production costs.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, soil and land
Size: 884 kb
Pages: 4



ID-263

Alternative Protein Sources for Cattle

7/2/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Darrell Johnson, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Katherine VanValin

Kentucky has several bourbon distilleries and one fuel ethanol plant. The spent grains from the production of ethanol is utilized as a protein source in livestock feed. Shutdowns for fuel ethanol plants may also occur as a result of unfavorable profit margins when crude oil prices are low. Most distilleries and fuel ethanol plants will have a scheduled maintenance shutdown each year. During a shutdown, availability of distillers grains and other coproducts from these plants may be limited or unavailable. So, the question is what else can I feed in place of distillers grains?

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Regulatory Services
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 300 kb
Pages: 2



ASC-244

Feeding Distillery Stillage to Beef Cattle

6/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler

The growth of the bourbon industry has provided an increase in distillery byproduct feedstuffs that can be utilized by cattle as a source of energy and protein. Learning the nutritional characteristics of these feedstuffs will facilitate proper feeding, allowing for improved cattle performance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 130 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-150

Understanding Soil Mechanics to Improve Beef Cattle Winter-Feeding Areas and Production

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Steve Higgins

Understanding soil mechanics and management in winter-feeding areas could improve beef cattle production, with less effort on the producer and cattle. This publication is intended to guide evaluating soil strength for winter-feeding areas, the pollution potential of winter-feeding areas, and to provide solutions for correcting structural deficiencies and reducing mud on both the ground and on the cattle.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, soil and land
Size: 93 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-151

Lanes for Beef Cattle Operations

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The benefits of lanes can be applied to pasture-based Kentucky cattle operations of any size. Lanes can be used to move cattle from pasture to pasture, and to access structures or barns, handling facilities, load-out areas, and areas with shade.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 2.89 mb
Pages: 2



AEN-147

Structures for Beef Cattle

2/13/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Livestock housing, whether simple or sophisticated, must perform the required functions. It should meet the thermal and physical needs of the animal; it should provide a place to store and feed materials without damage or loss; it should increase the performance of cattle; and, it should allow the producer to conduct all chores associated with cattle production efficiently. A building can contribute to management efficiency and animal performance, which itself is defined by productivity, health and welfare. The building should create optimum environmental conditions for cattle by providing light, air flow, appropriate flooring, space, and ventilation.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 956 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-145

Designing or Reworking Your Cattle-handling Facilities: A Checklist for Success

2/3/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Joshua Jackson

Cattle-handling facilities should be designed to match the management goals of the operation. The safety of workers and cattle should be the highest priority when designing or reworking a handling facility. A well-designed facility will make working cattle faster, safer, less labor intensive, and less frustrating.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 126 kb
Pages: 4



VET-36

Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle

12/9/2019 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by Anaplasma marginale, an organism that invades cattle red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in severe anemia, weight loss, fever, abortion and death in adult cattle. Anaplasmosis is considered a "tick-borne" disease because ticks transmit the organism when feeding on cattle. However, spread of this disease can be by any method that moves fresh blood from infected to susceptible cattle. In addition to ticks, the Anaplasma organism may be spread by biting insects (mosquitoes, horse flies, stable flies) or using blood-contaminated tools such as dehorners, ear taggers, castration tools, and implant guns without disinfection between animals. A very common method of transmission is using the same hypodermic needle on multiple animals when administering vaccines to the herd. Transmission may also be from cow to calf during gestation.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-144

Four Beef Cattle Barn Flooring Options: A Case Study

11/21/2019 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

Barn floor design is critical to the physical and thermal comfort, health and safety of cattle. Generally speaking, barn flooring is the surface on which an animal stands, lies down, and excretes its urine and manure. Therefore, to meet animal needs, it must be durable, not slippery, and well drained, as well as comfortable, warm, and dry. In addition to providing animal comfort, the flooring should easily be cleaned. No single material, from concrete to soil, meets all of these specifications.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, production practices
Size: 3.55 mb
Pages: 3



ID-258

Weaning Beef Calves

9/17/2019 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Michelle Arnold, Darrh Bullock, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Weaning is the process of separating suckling offspring from their dam. Weaning is a management procedure applied by the herd manager. Cattle are herd animals and their gregarious nature can lead to stress as a result of this separation. Managing the weaning process can aid in reducing stress for the animals and livestock managers.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 821 kb
Pages: 4



ID-188

Strategic Winter Feeding of Cattle using a Rotational Grazing Structure

7/30/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Winter feeding of cattle is a necessary part of nearly all cow-calf operations. In winter months, livestock producers often confine animals to smaller "sacrifice" pastures to reduce the area damaged from winter feeding. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have significant negative impacts on soil and water quality. Such areas include locations in floodplains, such as those along creek bottoms or around barns near streams. These locations are convenient, flat areas for setting hay ring feeders; however, their negative effects on water quality outweigh the convenience.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 737 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-134

Fenceline Feeder Systems for Beef Cattle Production and Resource Conservation

7/29/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

One of the most challenging and costly aspects of beef cattle production in Kentucky is winter-feeding. Many producers complain about the time required to feed stored forages, the mud, the drudgery that it creates for the operator, and the decline in production. The intense traffic associated with winter-feeding on unimproved surfaces causes mud, compaction, erosion, and loss of desirable vegetation, often resulting in annual pasture renovations to address areas impacted by winter-feeding practices. Fenceline feeding systems offer an alternative to traditional in-field bale feeding during the wet winter conditions that Kentucky often experiences. These structures can be utilized to reduce the impact of winter-feeding on pastures and improve the operational efficiency of a winter-feeding area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 2.55 mb
Pages: 13



ASC-12

Balancing Rations

5/31/1991 (minor revision)
Authors: Roy Burris, Nelson Gay, John Johns, Dave Patterson

Because feed costs are the major cost of producing beef, making the most efficient use of feeds is of prime importance in determining profits. Rations must be properly balanced for cattle to use feeds most efficiently. Ration balancing is another management tool the efficient producer can use to maximize profits.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 32 kb
Pages:



ID-13

Beef Cattle Corrals and Handling Facilities

4/1/1986 (reprinted)
Authors: Curtis Absher, Roy Burris, Sam McNeill, Larry Turner

Proven management practices such as castrating, dehorning, pregnancy examination, controlling parasites, implanting, vaccinating, etc. are essential if profits are to be realized in beef herds. Although most practices are relatively simple, they cannot be done easily without some type of restraining equipment which will prevent injury to both man and animal. The absence of cattle handling facilities probably contributes more than anything else to failure to perform these money-making procedures.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 17 kb
Pages:



ID-224

Producer's Guide to Pasture-Based Beef Finishing

(reprinted)
Authors: Greg Halich, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Lee Meyer, Gregg Rentfrow, Ray Smith

Will pasture-finished beef eventually become a commodity with lowered product prices? These and other questions must be evaluated by those considering pasture-based beef finishing. As with any new enterprise, however, the learning curve is steep, and success requires a commitment to working through the many production, marketing, and processing details. This reference guide provides a foundation for this process.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Food Sciences, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 1.51 mb
Pages: 48