Online Publication Catalog


Filter titles by tag:

In descending order, by date published.

 


 

beef cattle


ASC-244

Feeding Distillery Stillage to Beef Cattle

6/1/2020 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Darrh Bullock, Kevin Laurent, Jeff Lehmkuhler

The growth of the bourbon industry has provided an increase in distillery byproduct feedstuffs that can be utilized by cattle as a source of energy and protein. Learning the nutritional characteristics of these feedstuffs will facilitate proper feeding, allowing for improved cattle performance.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 130 kb
Pages: 3



AEN-150

Understanding Soil Mechanics to Improve Beef Cattle Winter-Feeding Areas and Production

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Morgan Hayes, Steve Higgins

Understanding soil mechanics and management in winter-feeding areas could improve beef cattle production, with less effort on the producer and cattle. This publication is intended to guide evaluating soil strength for winter-feeding areas, the pollution potential of winter-feeding areas, and to provide solutions for correcting structural deficiencies and reducing mud on both the ground and on the cattle.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, soil and land
Size: 93 kb
Pages: 2



AEN-151

Lanes for Beef Cattle Operations

5/14/2020 (new)
Authors: Steve Higgins

The benefits of lanes can be applied to pasture-based Kentucky cattle operations of any size. Lanes can be used to move cattle from pasture to pasture, and to access structures or barns, handling facilities, load-out areas, and areas with shade.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 2.89 mb
Pages: 2



VET-36

Anaplasmosis in Beef Cattle

12/9/2019 (new)
Authors: Michelle Arnold

Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by Anaplasma marginale, an organism that invades cattle red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in severe anemia, weight loss, fever, abortion and death in adult cattle. Anaplasmosis is considered a "tick-borne" disease because ticks transmit the organism when feeding on cattle. However, spread of this disease can be by any method that moves fresh blood from infected to susceptible cattle. In addition to ticks, the Anaplasma organism may be spread by biting insects (mosquitoes, horse flies, stable flies) or using blood-contaminated tools such as dehorners, ear taggers, castration tools, and implant guns without disinfection between animals. A very common method of transmission is using the same hypodermic needle on multiple animals when administering vaccines to the herd. Transmission may also be from cow to calf during gestation.

Departments: Veterinary Science
Series: Veterinary Science (VET series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 450 kb
Pages: 3



ID-258

Weaning Beef Calves

9/17/2019 (new)
Authors: Les Anderson, Michelle Arnold, Darrh Bullock, Jeff Lehmkuhler

Weaning is the process of separating suckling offspring from their dam. Weaning is a management procedure applied by the herd manager. Cattle are herd animals and their gregarious nature can lead to stress as a result of this separation. Managing the weaning process can aid in reducing stress for the animals and livestock managers.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Veterinary Science
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock
Size: 821 kb
Pages: 4



ID-188

Strategic Winter Feeding of Cattle using a Rotational Grazing Structure

7/30/2019 (reviewed)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Jeff Lehmkuhler, Sarah Wightman

Winter feeding of cattle is a necessary part of nearly all cow-calf operations. In winter months, livestock producers often confine animals to smaller "sacrifice" pastures to reduce the area damaged from winter feeding. A poorly chosen site for winter feeding can have significant negative impacts on soil and water quality. Such areas include locations in floodplains, such as those along creek bottoms or around barns near streams. These locations are convenient, flat areas for setting hay ring feeders; however, their negative effects on water quality outweigh the convenience.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 737 kb
Pages: 4



AEN-134

Fenceline Feeder Systems for Beef Cattle Production and Resource Conservation

7/29/2019 (major revision)
Authors: Steve Higgins, Lee Moser

One of the most challenging and costly aspects of beef cattle production in Kentucky is winter-feeding. Many producers complain about the time required to feed stored forages, the mud, the drudgery that it creates for the operator, and the decline in production. The intense traffic associated with winter-feeding on unimproved surfaces causes mud, compaction, erosion, and loss of desirable vegetation, often resulting in annual pasture renovations to address areas impacted by winter-feeding practices. Fenceline feeding systems offer an alternative to traditional in-field bale feeding during the wet winter conditions that Kentucky often experiences. These structures can be utilized to reduce the impact of winter-feeding on pastures and improve the operational efficiency of a winter-feeding area.

Departments: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Agricultural Engineering (AEN series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 2.55 mb
Pages: 13



ASC-12

Balancing Rations

5/31/1991 (minor revision)
Authors: Roy Burris, Nelson Gay, John Johns, Dave Patterson

Because feed costs are the major cost of producing beef, making the most efficient use of feeds is of prime importance in determining profits. Rations must be properly balanced for cattle to use feeds most efficiently. Ration balancing is another management tool the efficient producer can use to maximize profits.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences
Series: Animal Science (ASC series)
Tags: beef cattle, livestock, nutrition and health
Size: 32 kb
Pages:



ID-13

Beef Cattle Corrals and Handling Facilities

4/1/1986 (reprinted)
Authors: Curtis Absher, Roy Burris, Sam McNeill, Larry Turner

Proven management practices such as castrating, dehorning, pregnancy examination, controlling parasites, implanting, vaccinating, etc. are essential if profits are to be realized in beef herds. Although most practices are relatively simple, they cannot be done easily without some type of restraining equipment which will prevent injury to both man and animal. The absence of cattle handling facilities probably contributes more than anything else to failure to perform these money-making procedures.

Departments: Animal and Food Sciences, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: beef cattle, equipment and structures, livestock
Size: 17 kb
Pages: