University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Not a complete list as of 8-30-17.

Tag: fruits and nuts



2017 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/5/2017 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collec-tion of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry. The 2017 Fruit and Vegetable Crops re-search report includes results for 16 projects. | PR-739
900 printed copies | 46 pages | - | - | PDF: 7,210 kb


Cane Diseases of Brambles
11/1/2017 (major revision)

Anthracnose can cause severe damage to blackberries, purple and black raspberries, and to a much lesser extent, red raspberries in Kentucky. When left unchecked, anthracnose can significantly reduce overall yields, as well as limit the longevity of bramble plantings. Disease also causes loss of winter hardiness. | PPFS-FR-S-17
web only | 5 pages | 800 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 299 kb


2017 Kentucky Blackberry Cost and Return Estimates
10/11/2017 (minor revision)

Potential producers should realize that while thornless semi-erect varieties produce superior economic returns, thorny and thornless erect varieties may hold some marketing advantages that can command superior prices and result in better returns than those estimated using these standard assumptions. | ID-149
web only | 20 pages | 11,224 words | 42 downloads | PDF: 265 kb


Wine Distribution for Small Farm Wineries in Kentucky
8/22/2017 (new)

Small farm wineries in the state of Kentucky face a major issue when they look to expand, through wholesale distribution, into retail outlets. Like many states, Kentucky uses a "three-tier system" of distribution, where wineries must sell their product to a distributor, who then can legally sell the product to retailers. But because small- to medium-sized wineries rarely produce a volume that is attractive to major brand distributors, their products either don't make it to the retail shelves, or are placed suboptimally for their target market. Here, we look at ways to address this issue in order to help promote the wine industry from the wholesale point-of-view. | HO-116
20 printed copies | 3 pages | 2,356 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 173 kb


Commercial Strawberry Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide
8/1/2017 (new)

A fungicide spray guide and worksheet for commercial strawberry growers. | PPFS-FR-S-26
web only | 2 pages | 419 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 230 kb


Black Walnuts
4/19/2017 (new)

This profile focuses on Eastern black walnut for nut production. Persian walnuts are not recommended for commercial production in Kentucky, where Persian walnut is limited by cold temperatures, winter injury and late spring frost damage; walnut blight; and squirrels, which eat the nuts when they are immature. Detailed production information for both Eastern black walnut and Persian walnut is available in the University of Kentucky Extension publication ID-77, Nut Tree Growing in Kentucky. The University of Missouri offers a very detailed publication, listed in the Selected Resources section at the end of this publication, on establishing and cultivating Eastern black walnut for nut production. | CCD-CP-128
web only | 4 pages | 2,000 words | 14 downloads | PDF: 672 kb


Juneberries
4/19/2017 (minor revision)

Juneberry (Amelanchier spp.), also known as serviceberry, is a small multiple-stemmed tree or shrub that bears edible fruit. This genus includes saskatoons (Amelanchier alnifolia), which are grown commercially for fruit production in Canada and the North Central U.S. Unfortunately, saskatoons are not considered winter hardy in Kentucky and have serious leaf spot problems in this region. Most other species of Amelanchier are cultivated for use in landscape plantings; however, several of these ornamental cultivars show potential for fruit production. Among these are the Allegheny serviceberry (A. laevis) and hybrids (Amelanchier x grandiflora), which are hardy and have good leaf spot resistance in Kentucky | CCD-CP-11
web only | 3 pages | 1,529 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 700 kb


2016 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/13/2016 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production continues to show sustained growth in Kentucky. As the industry grows around a diverse collection of marketing tactics (wholesale, farmers markets, CSAs, and direct to restaurants) as well as various production systems, there continues to be a need for applied practical information to support the industry. | PR-721
1,000 printed copies | 40 pages | 20,554 words | 50 downloads | PDF: 2,804 kb


Sweet Cherries
11/14/2016 (minor revision)

Sweet cherries (Prunus avium) are mainly consumed fresh; however, they may also be frozen, canned, or processed for wine. Frequent losses due to such factors as fluctuating winter temperatures, spring frosts, rain-induced fruit cracking, and bird losses make commercial sweet cherry production a challenge in Kentucky. | CCD-CP-20
web only | 3 pages | 1,231 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 881 kb


Organic Blackberries and Raspberries
11/3/2016 (new)

Blackberries and raspberries (both Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as "brambles" or "caneberries." Erect (thorny and thornless), thorny primocane fruiting, and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries, as well as fall bearing raspberries, present an opportunity for organic production in Kentucky. Pests, especially spotted wing drosophila (SWD), present the greatest challenge for organic bramble production. | CCD-CP-12
web only | 5 pages | 2,523 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 799 kb


Chinese Chestnuts
7/18/2016 (minor revision)

American chestnuts (Castanea dentata), once prominent in the eastern U.S. landscape, all but disappeared in the mid-1900s when chestnut blight eradicated nearly all of these popular trees. Blight resistant varieties of Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) are a viable alternative for commercial chestnut production. | CCD-CP-66
web only | 3 pages | 1,563 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 594 kb


Wine Grapes, Kentucky, 2016: Vinifera
7/15/2016 (minor revision)

Budget worksheet. | CCD-BG-9
web only | 6 pages | 1,318 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 336 kb


Wine Grapes, Kentucky, 2016: French-American Hybrid and American Varieties
7/15/2016 (minor revision)

Budget worksheet. | CCD-BG-8
web only | 6 pages | 1,365 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 340 kb


Table Grapes, Kentucky, 2016
7/15/2016 (minor revision)

Budget worksheet. | CCD-BG-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,094 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 119 kb


2016 Kentucky Grape Costs and Returns: Budget Summaries and Assumptions
7/15/2016 (minor revision)

Production budgets for American, hybrid, European (vinifera), and table grape varieties were updated to estimate grape profitability in Kentucky for 2016. This analysis indicates that wine grapes can be economically feasible in Kentucky when best production practices are followed that maximize yields and when market prices approach $1,200/ton for vinifera wine grapes and $1,000 per ton for French-American and American hybrid wine grape varieties. Sound management that maximizes wine grape yields and minimizes input costs, with marketing that captures top grape prices, is absolutely necessary for economically viable wholesale grape production in Kentucky. | CCD-BG-6
web only | 3 pages | 1,177 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 193 kb


Plums
7/5/2016 (minor revision)

Plums, like peaches, are stone fruits and in the Rose family. These two crops have similar cultural requirements, as well as similar disease and pest concerns. Plums are also sensitive to late spring frosts, which can result in crop losses in Kentucky. Depending on the type and cultivar, plums can be consumed fresh, canned, frozen, processed in jams and jellies, and dried. | CCD-CP-17
web only | 3 pages | 1,377 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 750 kb


Commercial Apple Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide
7/1/2016 (minor revision)

A sample spray guide and spray schedule worksheet. | PPFS-FR-T-19
web only | 2 pages | 365 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 337 kb


Raspberries
6/9/2016 (minor revision)

Raspberries (Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as "brambles" or "caneberries." They have perennial crowns and roots that produce biennial canes. The canes bear fruit the second year and then die naturally after harvest. Some raspberries (known as "everbearing" or "fall-bearing") also produce fruit at the tips of the first-year canes. | CCD-CP-18
web only | 3 pages | 1,296 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 713 kb


Backyard Berry Disease and Disease Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-25
web only | 4 pages | 1,260 words | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,037 kb


Backyard Grape Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 1,263 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,213 kb


Backyard Stone Fruit Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,234 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 890 kb


Backyard Apple Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-21
web only | 4 pages | 1,311 words | 27 downloads | PDF: 1,013 kb


Simplified Backyard Grape Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A simplified backyard grape spray guide (table). | PPFS-FR-S-23
web only | 1 pages | 323 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 351 kb


Sample Fungicide Spray Schedule for Commercial Bramble
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A sample fungicide spray schedule for commercial bramble (table). | PPFS-FR-S-22
web only | 1 pages | 152 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 236 kb


Sample Fungicide Spray Schedule for Commercial Blueberry
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A sample fungicide spray schedule for commercial blueberry growers (table). | PPFS-FR-S-21
web only | 1 pages | 197 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 280 kb


Commercial Grape Fungicide Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (new)

A fungicide schedule worksheet and two sample spray guides for commercial grape growers. | PPFS-FR-S-20
web only | 3 pages | 599 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 427 kb


Simplified Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Peach, nectarine, apricot, plum, and cherry are all stone fruits. Production of these tree fruits requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. Disease resistant cultivars are the preferred method for reducing spray inputs. | PPFS-FR-T-20
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 672 kb


Simplified Backyard Apple Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Apple production requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. | PPFS-FR-T-18
web only | 4 pages | 1,284 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 626 kb


Fungicides for Tree Fruits
4/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-92, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-11
web only | 3 pages | 894 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 124 kb


Simplified Fungicide Guide for Backyard Fruit
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

This fungicide spray guide is intended as a supplement to the more detailed spray schedule available in Disease and Insect Control Programs for Homegrown Fruit in Kentucky, Including Organic Alternatives, ID-21. | PPFS-GEN-8
web only | 2 pages | 554 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 431 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Grape Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-S-18
web only | 5 pages | 1,450 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 407 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Strawberry Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-S-15
web only | 3 pages | 885 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 398 kb


Commercial Peach/Stone Fruit Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet
3/1/2016 (new)

A spray schedule worksheet for commercial peach/stone fruit growers. | PPFS-FR-T-23
web only | 1 pages | 181 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 458 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Apple Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-15
web only | 3 pages | 576 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 385 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Stone Fruit Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-14
web only | 3 pages | 1,047 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 401 kb


Cherry Leaf Spot
3/1/2016 (new)

Cherry leaf spot occurs on both sweet and sour cherry; however, it is considerably more serious on sour cherries. Premature defoliation from cherry leaf spot reduces flower bud set for the next year, weakens trees, and increases sensitivity to winter injury. | PPFS-FR-T-6
web only | 1 pages | 311 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 500 kb


Frogeye Leaf Spot, Black Rot, and Canker of Apple
2/1/2016 (new)

Black rot and frogeye are common names of an apple disease that occurs in three phases: (1) leaf infections result in frogeye leaf spot, while (2) fruit rot and (3) branch infections are referred to as black rot. All three phases can cause significant damage in Kentucky home and commercial orchards. | PPFS-FR-T-3
web only | 3 pages | 785 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 1,003 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. | PPFS-VG-23
web only | 2 pages | 822 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 788 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein. | PPFS-VG-22
web only | 2 pages | 841 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 460 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases. | PPFS-VG-21
web only | 2 pages | 981 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 874 kb


2015 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/21/2015 (new)

The 2015 Fruit and Vegetable Crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in seven counties in Kentucky: Jefferson, Spencer, Trimble, Shelby, Caldwell, Franklin, and Fayette. | PR-706
1,000 printed copies | 44 pages | 27,911 words | 57 downloads | PDF: 1,542 kb


Black Knot
12/1/2015 (new)

Black knot is a common, often serious, disease of plums and cherries in Kentucky. Ornamental Prunus species, as well as wild plums and cherries, may also be affected. Trees in both commercial and residential plantings are susceptible. | PPFS-FR-T-4
web only | 2 pages | 617 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 784 kb


Peach Leaf Curl and Plum Pockets
12/1/2015 (new)

Peach leaf curl occurs annually in commercial and residential orchards throughout Kentucky. The disease causes severe defoliation, weakens trees, and reduces fruit quality, fruit set, and yield. Peaches, apricots, and nectarines are susceptible to peach leaf curl. Plum pockets is a similar, but less common, disease that occurs on wild and cultivated plums. | PPFS-FR-T-1
web only | 3 pages | 667 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 887 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden
12/1/2015 (new)

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants. | PPFS-VG-20
web only | 2 pages | 781 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 896 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden
12/1/2015 (new)

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen. | PPFS-VG-19
web only | 2 pages | 854 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 995 kb


Gummosis and Perennial Canker of Stone Fruits
11/1/2015 (minor revision)

Gummosis is a general, nonspecific condition of stone fruits (peach, nectarine, plum and cherry) in which gum is exuded and deposited on the bark of trees. Gum is produced in response to any type of wound, regardless of whether it is due to insects, mechanical injury or disease. | PPFS-FR-T-8
web only | 2 pages | 559 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 207 kb


Apple Rust Diseases
8/1/2015 (new)

Cedar-apple rust is the most common and economically important rust disease occurring on apple in Kentucky. Two other rusts, cedar-hawthorn rust and cedar-quince rust, are of lesser importance on apple, but can significantly impact ornamental plants. All three diseases occur on crabapple, hawthorn, mountain ash, pear, and serviceberry. | PPFS-FR-T-5
web only | 5 pages | 1,395 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 813 kb


Blueberry Root Rot
5/1/2015 (new)

Blueberry is considered one of the most disease-free fruit crops in Kentucky. Many of the diseases that affect blueberry result in minor damage. However, the most common disease of blueberry, Phytophthora root rot, can cause severe dieback and often results in plant death. The causal agent of blueberry root rot is Phytophthora cinnamomi, a soilborne water mold that occurs world-wide and can infect a wide range of hosts, including woody ornamentals. Under optimal conditions, the pathogen proliferates, and disease symptoms occur. | PPFS-FR-S-19
web only | 3 pages | 993 words | 1 download | PDF: 702 kb


2014 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/7/2015 (new)

The 2014 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in three counties in Kentucky, including: Mason, Shelby, and Spencer. | PR-688
web only | 42 pages | 29,201 words | 67 downloads | PDF: 950 kb


Kentucky Strawberry Profitability Estimated Costs and Returns
11/10/2014 (minor revision)

The profitability of two different strawberry production scenarios in Kentucky was analyzed to reflect 2014 production costs. The attached tables report potential profits for both Pick Your Own (PYO) and Wholesale/Retail production. | CCD-BG-5
web only | 2 pages | 695 words | 1 download | PDF: 332 kb


Highbush Blueberries, Kentucky, 2014 (Wholesale/Retail Marketing)
8/29/2014 (minor revision)

Budget worksheet. | CCD-BG-4
web only | 7 pages | 1,573 words | 1 download | PDF: 352 kb


Highbush Blueberries, Kentucky, 2014 (PYO Harvest)
8/29/2014 (minor revision)

Budget worksheet. | CCD-BG-3
web only | 2 pages | 1,573 words | - | PDF: 352 kb


Blueberry Cost and Return Estimates
8/29/2014 (minor revision)

Blueberries are a crop with excellent long-term profitability potential for Kentucky producers willing to invest the time, capital, and management necessary for establishing productive blueberry acreage. Blueberries have the advantage of having lower establishment costs than other berry crops that require trellis systems for production. Once established, properly managed blueberry bushes can produce for many years. | CCD-BG-2
web only | 4 pages | 1,164 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 561 kb


Asian and European Pears
8/26/2014 (minor revision)

Very few European pears (Pyrus communis) are grown commercially in Kentucky, primarily due to problems with fire blight and late spring frosts. Asian pears (P. pyrifolia, synonym P. serotina), on the other hand, are more consistently productive in Kentucky in spite of these problems. Also called apple pears, Asian pears are crisp and juicy like an apple, but with the sweetness associated with pears. | CCD-CP-3
web only | 3 pages | 1,183 words | - | PDF: 465 kb


Organic Blueberries
8/20/2014 (minor revision)

The highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub that will do well in most areas of Kentucky as long as the soil pH is properly adjusted. Organic production requires the use of pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling their berries with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency and follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). | CCD-CP-13
web only | 6 pages | 2,842 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 633 kb


Peaches
8/19/2014 (minor revision)

The peach (Prunus persica), which originated in China, is a member of the Rose family. In the past, commercial peach production in Kentucky has been profitable only in western counties, in southern counties, and in areas along the Ohio River. However, over the past 15 years as winters have become warmer, peach growers are also doing well in areas west of the mountains, as long as good sites that avoid late spring frosts are selected. | CCD-CP-15
web only | 3 pages | 1,309 words | 1 download | PDF: 491 kb


Strawberries
7/31/2014 (minor revision)

The quality of Kentucky-grown strawberries can be far superior to berries that are shipped-in. There is a strong market for local berries, particularly near population centers. A large proportion of the strawberries grown in Kentucky are currently sold on a U-Pick basis. Other marketing options include roadside stands and local grocers. Farmers markets, produce auctions, community supported agriculture (CSA) shares, and restaurants are also outlets for strawberries. Some producers are using crop surpluses to produce jams and jellies for local sale. | CCD-CP-19
web only | 3 pages | 1,318 words | - | PDF: 499 kb


Grapes
6/23/2014 (minor revision)

Grapes (Vitis spp.) are suitable for either large-scale or small-scale commercial production. Typically three types of grapes are grown in Kentucky: Native American, hybrid, and European grapes. The climate in Kentucky is the limiting factor to grape production. Although American and hybrid cultivars are better suited for production in Kentucky, European (vinifera) cultivars are more desirable and potentially have the highest economic gain for grape growers and wine makers. However, vinifera cultivars are more susceptible to winter injury and diseases resulting in a lower yield, reduced fruit quality, and often vine death. Growing grapes in Kentucky can be highly successful and rewarding if the cultivars are matched to a specific site and proper production techniques are implemented. | CCD-CP-7
web only | 4 pages | 1,653 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 694 kb


Blackberries
6/19/2014 (minor revision)

Blackberries (Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as 'brambles' or 'caneberries.' They have perennial crowns and roots that produce biennial canes. Most blackberry types produce canes that bear fruit the second year and then die naturally after harvest. Primocane fruiting blackberries produce canes that grow and fruit the first season (primocane) in late summer and fall and also produce fruit on these same canes (floricanes) the second season in July and early August before dying. Blackberries are grouped according to their growth habit: erect, semi-erect, and trailing. The trailing types are not recommended for commercial production in Kentucky due to their lack of winter hardiness. Erect (thorny and thornless) and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries, however, grow and yield well in most parts of the state. Primocane fruiting thorny and thornless blackberries also do well in Kentucky, however hot summers substantially reduce the primocane crop because temperatures above 85 F cause flowers to abort. With favorable growing conditions, a planting may produce for 12 or more years. | CCD-CP-4
web only | 4 pages | 1,415 words | 1 download | PDF: 724 kb


Midwest Blueberry Production Guide
5/12/2014 (reprinted)

Blueberries are one of the few fruit crops native to North America. Wild blueberries were utilized by Native Americans for making medicines, dyes, and flavorings, as well as for direct consumption. Once a small-scale crop produced within limited regions, blueberries are now grown throughout the United States and the rest of the world. | ID-210
1,500 printed copies | 58 pages | 28,039 words | 86 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Apple in Kentucky
5/7/2014 (new)

The National Integrated Pest Management Network defines IPM as "a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks." One of the key components of IPM is to continually scout and monitor crops to identify problems before they result in significant economic losses. Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during apple production in Kentucky. | ID-219
3,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 5,056 words | 42 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Disease and Insect Control Program for Home Grown Fruit in Kentucky
4/29/2014 (reprinted)

Many homeowners in Kentucky grow a variety of fruits in their garden and are rewarded for their effort. One distinct advantage homeowners have over commercial orchardists is the diverse ecosystem of the home landscape (vegetable gardens, flower and fruit plantings intermixed with turf and landscape plants). Diversity often reduces the spread of insect and disease organisms and tends to keep their populations at lower, more manageable levels. | ID-21
1,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 10,516 words | 128 downloads | PDF: 1,000 kb


High Tunnel Brambles
4/7/2014 (minor revision)

High tunnels are relatively simple polyethylene-covered greenhouses placed over irrigated ground beds. Also known as hoop houses, high tunnels have been used to extend the marketing window of a wide variety of annual crops in Kentucky, such as vegetables and cut flowers. Perennial crops, such as brambles, can also be produced in high tunnels. | CCD-CP-8
web only | 6 pages | 2,906 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 619 kb


High Tunnel Strawberries
4/4/2014 (minor revision)

High tunnels are relatively simple polyethylene-covered unheated structures placed over irrigated ground beds. Also known as hoop houses, high tunnels can be used to extend the production season of a wide variety of crops in Kentucky, including strawberries. A plasticulture system with drip irrigation is recommended when using high tunnels for strawberry production. | CCD-CP-61
web only | 4 pages | 2,061 words | 1 download | PDF: 528 kb


Highbush Blueberries
3/28/2014 (minor revision)

The highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub that will do well in most areas of Kentucky as long as the soil is properly adjusted. With proper care, blueberry plants may remain productive for 40 years or more | CCD-CP-9
web only | 4 pages | 1,386 words | 1 download | PDF: 1,000 kb


Plasticulture Strawberries
3/20/2014 (minor revision)

There is always a market for fresh, local strawberries (Fragaria spp.), and growers able to provide the earliest crop often have the marketing edge. For growers willing to make the investment in time and resources, the annual plasticulture system may allow the grower to have berries about one month sooner than growers using the traditional matted row system. Plasticulture production can either be used as a stand-alone enterprise or as part of a diversified operation. | CCD-CP-16
web only | 3 pages | 1,374 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 491 kb


Apples
3/15/2014 (minor revision)

Over the past 40 years Kentucky growers have produced apples (Malus domestica) using free-standing trees in low to medium density plantings. Today's high density orchards have closely planted trees on dwarfing rootstocks requiring permanent support structures. Earlier production, quicker returns on the investment, and improved fruit quality are just a few of the many benefits of the new high-density systems. | CCD-CP-2
web only | 3 pages | 1,389 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 519 kb


Sustainable Production Systems: Principles and Approaches for Optimizing Efficiency in Nursery and Landscape Businesses
3/14/2014 (new)

Publications in the Sustainable Production Systems series discuss ways of pursuing sustainability in nursery production systems. Sustainable businesses are those that yield acceptable returns on investments, conserve natural resources, make positive contributions to the community, and create a workplace culture where employees feel safe, productive, and valued. | HO-110
web only | 17 pages | 9,670 words | 33 downloads | PDF: 5,953 kb


2013 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
1/8/2014 (new)

Variety trials included in this year's publication include: cabbage, asparagus, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, apples, peaches, and grapes. Additional research trials include organic management of cucumber beetles, financial comparison of organic potato integrated pest management systems, and effect of organic fertilizer materials for production of kale. | PR-673
web only | 44 pages | 23,586 words | 76 downloads | PDF: 2,491 kb


Fruit, Orchard, and Vineyard Sanitation
8/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home fruit plantings, resulting in premature leaf drop, fruit decay, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-5
web only | 3 pages | 919 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 723 kb


Jujube and Aronia
2/11/2013 (new)

Black aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) and jujube (Ziziphus jujube) are minor fruits that could have commercial potential in some areas of Kentucky. Growers looking for unique crops to add to their product mix may want to consider these novel fruits on a small-scale. | CCD-CP-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,796 words | 1 download | PDF: 610 kb


Sustainable Production Systems: Efficient Wholesale Nursery Layout
1/31/2013 (new)

This publication provides the framework for planning and implementing efficient wholesale nursery layout. Concepts and ideas presented here are applicable to new construction or the modification of an existing nursery. A basic approach toward creating efficient systems will be discussed as well as common nursery activities that may require consideration during the planning stages. Functional areas will be defined, and a framework for understanding the relationships between these functional areas will be presented. | HO-109
web only | 10 pages | 7,699 words | 53 downloads | PDF: 4,000 kb


2012 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/6/2012 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2012 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 18 field research plots and several demonstration trials. This year fruit and vegetable research and demonstration trials were conducted in more than 15 counties in Kentucky. Research was conducted by faculty and staff from several departments within the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture including: Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Agricultural Economics. This report also includes collaborative research projects conducted with faculty and staff at Kentucky State University. | PR-656
web only | 47 pages | 21,679 words | 54 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Black Rot of Grape
10/1/2012 (new)

Black rot is the most prevalent and one of the most important grape diseases in Kentucky. While this disease can affect all young developing plant tissues above ground, fruit infections are the most destructive. Without an adequate disease management program, both home and commercial vineyards suffer significant yield losses. | PPFS-FR-S-16
web only | 4 pages | 1,272 words | - | PDF: 555 kb


Apple Scab
8/1/2012 (new)

Apple scab is the most consistently serious disease of apple and flowering crabapple in Kentucky. This disease also occurs on hawthorn and mountain ash; a similar disease affects pear and pyracantha (firethorn). The most noticeable losses on apple result from reduced fruit quality and from premature drop of infected fruit. Scab also causes a general weakening of the host when leaves are shed prematurely. Summer defoliation of flowering crabapple due to scab invariably results in fewer flowers the next spring. | PPFS-FR-T-13
web only | 3 pages | 1,045 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 486 kb


Fire Blight
8/1/2012 (minor revision)

Fire blight is a highly destructive disease of apple and pear that can occur in commercial orchards and home plantings. Many landscape trees and shrubs in the rose family are also susceptible to this disease. Fire blight can cause severe damage in a very short period of time. Because precise conditions are needed for infection, disease appearance is erratic from year to year. | PPFS-FR-T-12
web only | 4 pages | 1,556 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 650 kb


Pawpaw
7/16/2012 (minor revision)

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a unique tree fruit native to the eastern United States. Its highly aromatic fruit has a sweet, almost tropical-like flavor. The large fruit is oblong and typically produced singly or in clusters of two to nine. Pawpaw fruit pulp can be eaten fresh or prepared in a variety of desserts. | CCD-CP-14
web only | 3 pages | 1,094 words | 1 download | PDF: 444 kb


Growing Tree Fruits: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 16
3/12/2012 (new)

Growing tree fruits and/or nuts can provide a great deal of satisfaction, but it takes a commitment to care for your trees year-round. | HO-104
web only | 14 pages | 4,766 words | 125 downloads | PDF: 900 kb


Gooseberries and Currants
2/27/2012 (minor revision)

Gooseberries and currants (Ribes spp.) are woody, multi-stemmed shrubs best known for their tart fruit. While some enjoy eating them fresh, these fruit are especially prized for use in making jellies, jams, pies, and sauces. | CCD-CP-6
web only | 3 pages | 1,282 words | 1 download | PDF: 1,000 kb


Elderberry
2/20/2012 (minor revision)

Elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadnesis) is a large shrub or small tree native to Kentucky. The small fruit has prominent seeds and are produced in large clusters. While elderberries are not normally eaten fresh due to their tartness, wild and cultivated elderberries can be processed, either alone or with other fruit. | CCD-CP-5
web only | 4 pages | 1,096 words | 1 download | PDF: 490 kb


Strawberry Anthracnose
2/1/2012 (minor revision)

Anthracnose can be a serious problem in Southern and Midwestern strawberry plantings. The disease may appear as a fruit or crown rot, both of which severely reduce plant stands and yields. Fruit rot, the most common form of anthracnose, appears as fruit begins to ripen in late spring. Crown rots, on the other hand, can develop in young plants soon after planting or when weather warms in spring. | PPFS-FR-S-5
web only | 3 pages | 815 words | 1 download | PDF: 293 kb


Sample Submission Protocol for Diagnosis of Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut
2/1/2012 (new)

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a fatal disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra), and most recently, butternut (Juglans cinerea). The disease complex involves a fungus that is carried to trees by the walnut twig beetle, causing numerous cankers on branches and killing trees 5 to 6 years after infection. The disease complex is widespread in the western U.S., and has recently been identified in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. | PPFS-OR-W-15
web only | 2 pages | 557 words | 1 download | PDF: 361 kb


Peanuts
1/25/2012 (new)

Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea), also referred to as groundpeas or groundnuts, are an annual herbaceous legume with an indeterminate growth habit. As these alternate names imply, this unique plant produces its fruit (peanut) below ground. Once the small yellow flowers are self-pollinated, the fertilized ovary elongates into a "peg" which grows downward and penetrates into the soil. Peanuts develop underground at the ends of the pegs. The peanut seed is referred to a kernel and the outer shell is called a pod or hull. | CCD-CP-112
web only | 4 pages | 1,726 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 620 kb


2011 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2011 (new)

The 2011 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 19 field research plots and several demonstration trials. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools, which they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-626
web only | 53 pages | 26,604 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,391 kb


American Persimmon
9/27/2011 (minor revision)

The American or common persimmon, Diospyros virginiana, is a slow growing, moderately-sized tree native to Kentucky. Fruit are about 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Unripe fruit, which is high in tannins, has a bitter astringent flavor. The golden orange to red fruit are very sweet when fully ripened and astringency is reduced. Cultivated varieties may have improved quality and lose their astringency earlier in the fall. | CCD-CP-1
web only | 3 pages | 1,090 words | - | PDF: 404 kb


2011 Regional Wine Grape Marketing and Price Outlook
7/20/2011 (new)

Wine grape producers in the Southeast benefited from a rapid increase in the number of wineries in the region during the 1990s and early 2000s. The steady winery growth indicates continued expansion and demand for winegrapes. This survey was conducted in early 2011 to better understand how business practices are developing among wineries in Kentucky and six contiguous states---Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Tennessee, Virginia, and Missouri. | CCD-SV-1
web only | 6 pages | 1,984 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 205 kb


Rootstocks for Kentucky Fruit Trees
3/28/2011 (major revision)

Most fruit trees that can be grown in Kentucky do not come true from seed. For example, a tree grown from a Golden Delicious apple seed will produce an apple tree, but the fruit will have different characteristics than Golden Delicious in color, taste, and shape. This is why fruit trees are reproduced by asexual propagation, such as budding and grafting. | HO-82
web only | 6 pages | 3,890 words | 51 downloads | PDF: 215 kb


2010 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/20/2010 (new)

Fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky continues to grow. The 2010 Fruit and Vegetable crops research report includes results for more than 34 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 20 counties in Kentucky. | PR-608
1,000 printed copies | 70 pages | - | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Fruit Rots of Cucurbits
11/1/2010 (new)

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the fruit of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens. | PPFS-VG-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,411 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 315 kb


Peach Cultivar Performance
6/14/2010 (major revision)

The commercial success of a peach orchard depends largely on selecting cultivars that will perform reliably and meet market needs. Although many fruit and tree characteristics are presented in this report, the final cultivar selection should be determined by the grower. A grower may be influenced by soil type, local climate, or marketing methods and prefer a cultivar that is not a general favorite. Growers should have test plots of two to four trees of new cultivars to help them judge the performance in their orchard. | HO-6
web only | 6 pages | - | 24 downloads | PDF: 275 kb


Nut Tree Growing in Kentucky
4/22/2010 (major revision)

Kentucky is generally well suited for growing nut trees. Northern pecans, black walnuts, heartnuts, hickory nuts, hardy Persian walnuts (Carpathian strain), American hazelnuts, and Chinese chestnuts all grow well in the state. Although most nut trees are grown by hobbyists and backyard gardeners, several varieties appear to have potential for commercial production, particularly some of the USDA pecan selections and some Chinese chestnut varieties. | ID-77
web only | 24 pages | - | 52 downloads | PDF: 680 kb


2009 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/11/2009 (new)

The 2009 Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report includes results for more than 45 field research and demonstration trials that were conducted in 19 counties in Kentucky. Many of these reports include data on varietal performance as well as different production methods in an effort to provide growers with better tools that they can use to improve fruit and vegetable production in Kentucky. | PR-603
1,000 printed copies | 56 pages | - | 15 downloads | PDF: 850 kb


2008 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/1/2008 (new)

| PR-572
1,100 printed copies | 72 pages | - | 14 downloads | PDF: 800 kb


Fruit Rots of Grape
10/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky's typically wet springs and warm, humid summers favor the development of several fruit rots of grape. These include anthracnose, bitter rot, black rot, Botrytis bunch rot, ripe rot, and sour rot. | PPFS-FR-S-14
web only | 7 pages | 2,467 words | 1 download | PDF: 358 kb


Downy Mildew of Grape
9/1/2008 (new)

Downy mildew is an important disease of commercial and backyard grapes in Kentucky. This disease causes direct losses when flowers, clusters, and shoots decay and yields are reduced. Indirect losses result when premature defoliation predisposes grapevines to winter injury. It may take a vineyard several years to fully recover after severe winter injury. | PPFS-FR-S-13
web only | 3 pages | 987 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 282 kb


Poor Fruit Set in Brambles
9/1/2008 (new)

Poor fruit set and sterility commonly occur on bramble fruits (red raspberries, black raspberries, and blackberries) both in commercial and home plantings. Typically the fruit fails to develop or small misshapen berries form. When an insufficient number of drupelets fully develop, they tend to separate so that the fruit "crumbles" when picked. This symptom, referred to as "crumbly berry," is another common result of poor fruit set. | PPFS-FR-S-9
web only | 4 pages | 1,393 words | 1 download | PDF: 234 kb


Phytophthora Root Rot of Brambles
7/1/2008 (new)

Brambles that are subjected to wet soil conditions or periods of flooding are often predisposed to Phytophthora root rot. Excess water not only promotes susceptibility of roots to this disease, but also aids the fungus in moving to new infection sites. Phytophthora root rot is primarily a disease of raspberries; however, it can also occur on blackberries. | PPFS-FR-S-7
web only | 2 pages | 655 words | 1 download | PDF: 296 kb


Strawberry Fruit Rots
6/1/2008 (new)

Strawberry fruit rot diseases often make it difficult to obtain high yields of quality berries. Kentucky's typically moist springtime growing conditions favor these diseases, which often begin with infections of flowers at bloom. Diseases causing the decay of developing and ripe strawberries include gray mold, leather rot, and anthracnose. | PPFS-FR-S-8
web only | 5 pages | 2,025 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 274 kb


Blueberry Diseases
1/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky blueberry growers sometimes experience plant and crop losses due to diseases. While most losses are due to root rot, or to stem and twig canker diseases, fruit rots and nutritional problems can also reduce yields. With good crop management, most blueberry diseases can be avoided. | PPFS-FR-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,107 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 292 kb


2007 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
11/29/2007 (new)

| PR-555
1,000 printed copies | 92 pages | - | 10 downloads | PDF: 1,400 kb


Vineyard Site Selection in Kentucky Based on Climate and Soil Properties
10/5/2007 (new)

Commercial wine grapes have recently emerged as an alternative crop in Kentucky after laws evolved encouraging private entrepreneurs to invest in vineyards and small farm wineries many decades after prohibition shut down the industry. Grapes grown in Kentucky are exposed to biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce crop yields and quality or kill grapevines. Damaging winter temperatures, spring frosts, and higher than optimal growing temperatures occur regularly. Despite these challenges, grape growing is a successful enterprise in many areas of the state. | HO-87
2,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 30 downloads | PDF: 290 kb


Viticultural Regions and Suggested Cultivars in Kentucky
9/14/2007 (new)

Grapes grown in Kentucky are subject to environmental stresses that reduce crop yield and quality, and injure and kill grapevines. Damaging critical winter temperatures, late spring frosts, short growing seasons, and extreme summer temperatures all occur with regularity in regions of Kentucky. However, despite the challenging climate, certain species and cultivars of grapes are grown commercially in Kentucky. The aim of this bulletin is to describe the macroclimatic features affecting grape production that should be evaluated in the site selection process and to shorten the trial and error process of finding the best cultivar and climate match. | HO-88
2,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 39 downloads | PDF: 1,100 kb


Crop Estimation in Vineyards
8/15/2007 (new)

Viticulture is becoming a successful alternative cropping system in Kentucky due to the increased demand for locally grown grapes and their profitability. However, the sustainability of the industry is hindered by insufficient experience on estimating crop size of hybrid and vinifera cultivars in a region that is subject to frequent damaging winter and spring temperatures. | HO-86
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 20 downloads | PDF: 307 kb


Peach Fruit Diseases
6/1/2007 (new)

Peaches are grown in many Kentucky orchards for local fresh market sales. Fruit diseases, often resulting in decayed peaches, are a serious problem, especially during warm, humid, rainy weather conditions. | PPFS-FR-T-9
web only | 5 pages | 1,737 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 277 kb


Grape Crown Gall
5/1/2007 (new)

Crown gall is a common, devastating grape disease that has been known to result in losses of entire vineyards in Kentucky. Besides grapes, over 600 types of plants are known to be susceptible to crown gall, including apples, stone fruits and brambles. | PPFS-FR-S-11
web only | 3 pages | 871 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 168 kb


Strawberry Production in Kentucky
2/25/2007 (minor revision)

| HO-16
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 64 downloads | PDF: 340 kb


Honeyvine Milkweed Control in Tree Fruits, Small Fruits, and Grapes
1/19/2007 (new)

Honeyvine milkweed is a perennial weed commonly found in Kentucky fields, groves, and orchards. In general, honeyvine milkweed is a difficult weed to control due to its extensive taproot system and rapid growth rate. It is especially difficult to control in permanent crop situations such as plantings of apples, blueberries, and grapes. This is due to the fact that soil tillage is not practiced in orchards, blueberry fields, or vineyards, which would otherwise destroy the root system of honeyvine milkweed and prevent it from getting established. | HO-85
100 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 25 downloads | PDF: 320 kb


2006 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-538
1,100 printed copies | 82 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,337 kb


Orange Rust of Brambles
9/1/2006 (new)

Orange rust is a disease caused by one of two very similar fungi, Gymnoconia nitens in the Southeast, and Arthuriomyces peckianus in the Midwest. Both fungi, causing the same symptoms, may be active in Kentucky. In Kentucky, orange rust is severe on some wild and cultivated thorny blackberries. It infects black and purple raspberries and thornless blackberries somewhat, but is not known to infect red raspberries. | PPFS-FR-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 657 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 232 kb


2005 Fruit and Vegetable Research Report
12/30/2005 (new)

| PR-521
1,100 printed copies | 98 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,555 kb


Reproducing Fruit Trees by Graftage Budding and Grafting
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

| HO-39
web only | 8 pages | - | 33 downloads | PDF: 789 kb


Growing Blackberries and Raspberries in Kentucky
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

| HO-15
web only | 12 pages | - | 92 downloads | PDF: 325 kb


Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot and Eutypa Dieback Diseases of Grape
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

"Cane and leaf spot" and "Eutypa dieback" were once thought to be the same disease. However, it is now known that each is a distinct disease caused by a different fungus. Grapes grown in areas where a moist environment persists are especially vulnerable to these fungal diseases. | PPFS-FR-S-1
web only | 2 pages | 631 words | 1 download | PDF: 183 kb


Growing Highbush Blueberries in Kentucky
3/15/2005 (reprinted)

| HO-60
200 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 68 downloads | PDF: 403 kb


2004 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2004 (new)

| PR-504
1,100 printed copies | 74 pages | - | 11 downloads | PDF: 1,899 kb


Apple Fruit Diseases Appearing at Harvest
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Diseases of apple fruits appearing at harvest can cause significant losses in yield and quality. To know what control measures to take next year to prevent similar losses, it is important to recognize what is being observed. In some cases, growers will need to cut the fruit open to identify the problem. | PPFS-FR-T-2
web only | 2 pages | 613 words | 1 download | PDF: 306 kb


Raspberry Fruit Rots
7/1/2004 (minor revision)

Rainy summer and fall weather in Kentucky can provide ideal conditions for fruit decay diseases of raspberries. The most damaging are the fungal diseases gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) and soft rot, or leak (Rhizopus and Mucor spp.). Both diseases are favored by long periods of wet fruit and foliage, and by high humidity levels. During some parts of the season, fruit rots account for up to 50% loss of potential harvest, and additional losses after harvest. | PPFS-FR-S-4
web only | 2 pages | 446 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 181 kb


Blackberry Rosette (Double Blossom)
7/1/2004 (minor revision)

Rosette disease, caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi, is a serious and destructive disease of blackberries in most parts of Kentucky. In some locations, growers have been forced out of growing blackberries because of rosette disease. | PPFS-FR-S-3
web only | 2 pages | 516 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 208 kb


2003 Fruit and Vegetable Report
12/15/2003 (new)

| PR-488
1,100 printed copies | - | - | 1 download | HTML: 1 kb


2002 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/3/2003 (new)

| PR-470
1,000 printed copies | 65 pages | - | - | PDF: 2,400 kb


2001 Fruit and Vegetable Report
1/4/2002 (new)

| PR-452
1,100 printed copies | 60 pages | - | - | PDF: 437 kb


Total Quality Assurance Apple Production: Best Management Practices
5/1/2001 (new)

| ID-137
500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 32 downloads | PDF: 271 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Report 2000
12/3/2000 (new)

| PR-436
1,100 printed copies | 57 pages | - | - | PDF: 768 kb


Growing Grapes in Kentucky
4/30/2000 (reprinted)

Kentucky has a long record of good grape production. As a home fruit crop or commercial crop, grapes have many benefits. Grapevines are relatively inexpensive and easy to propagate. They reach full bearing potential in four years and bear annually. The many varieties of grapes can be consumed fresh or used to make grape juice, jams, jellies, and wine. Grapes are also easy to manage. Vines are trained on trellises or arbors and easily can be sprayed using small equipment for control of insects and diseases. | ID-126
3,000 printed copies | 24 pages | - | 70 downloads | PDF: 238 kb


Consumer Trends and Opportunities: Fruits
3/15/2000 (new)

| IP-58D
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 10 downloads | PDF: 89 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Crop Research Report 1999
12/31/1999 (new)

| PR-423
750 printed copies | 43 pages | - | - | PDF: 712 kb


Fruit and Vegetable Program: 1998 Research Report
12/1/1998 (new)

The emphases in our research program reflect industry-defined needs, expertise available at UK, and the nature of research projects around the world generating information applicable to Kentucky. Although the purpose of this publication is to report research results, the report also highlights our Extension program and Undergraduate and Graduate degree programs that address the needs of the horticultural industries. | PR-410
web only | 46 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 335 kb


Midwest Tree Fruit Pest Management Handbook
11/1/1998 (new)

| ID-93
5,000 printed copies | - | - | 10 downloads | HTML: 3 kb


Food Safety Pesticide Residues in Grains, Vegetables, Fruits and Nuts
9/1/1992 (minor revision)

| IP-9
300 printed copies | - | - | 2 downloads | HTML: 16 kb