University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Tag: legumes



2017 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/11/2017 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-734
400 printed copies | 4 pages | 2,182 words | 1 download | PDF: 450 kb


2017 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/11/2017 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. | PR-733
350 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,924 words | 1 download | PDF: 413 kb


2017 Alfalfa Report
11/29/2017 (new)

This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. Tables 14 and 15 (Roundup Ready varieties) shows a summary of all alfalfa varieties tested in Kentucky during the past 16 years. The UK Forage Extension website, at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage, contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states as well as a large number of other forage publications. | PR-727
400 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,822 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,530 kb


2017 Red and White Clover Report
11/27/2017 (new)

This report provides current yield and persistence data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. Tables 13 and 14 show a summary of all clover varieties tested in Kentucky for the past 15 years. The UK Forage Extension website at www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage contains electronic versions of all forage variety testing reports from Kentucky and surrounding states and a large number of other forage publications. | PR-728
600 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,739 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 757 kb


Soybean Production in Kentucky
3/22/2017 (major revision)

Soybean seed quality is very important for crop establishment. In general, seed quality is an indicator of a seed's ability to produce a seedling in field conditions and includes both seed germination and seed vigor. Most producers are familiar with seed germination since they have seen it on a seed tag. Fewer are familiar with seed vigor. | AGR-130
web only | 6 pages | 4,076 words | 62 downloads | PDF: 1,395 kb


2016 Red and White Clover Report
12/13/2016 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties generally are productive for 2.5 to 3 years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures and hay fields. This report provides current yield data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. | PR-710
600 printed copies | 8 pages | 2,998 words | 24 downloads | PDF: 1,018 kb


2016 Alfalfa Report
12/13/2016 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highestyielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. | PR-709
400 printed copies | 12 pages | 3,694 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 1,745 kb


2016 Kentucky Soybean Performance Tests
12/9/2016 (new)

The Kentucky Soybean Variety Performance Tests are conducted to provide an unbiased and objective estimate of the relative performance of soybean varieties sold in Kentucky. This information may be used by growers and seed producers to aid in selecting varieties that will give the highest total production in a specific situation. Soybean cultivars in the 2016 tests were entered by soybean growers, commercial companies, and state and federal institutions. | PR-722
2,500 printed copies | 36 pages | 10,317 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 4,611 kb


2016 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
11/17/2016 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-716
400 printed copies | 4 pages | 2,148 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 440 kb


2016 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
11/17/2016 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. | PR-715
350 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,903 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 397 kb


2015 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/14/2015 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a low-growing, perennial pasture legume with white flowers. It differs from red clover in that the stems (stolons) grow along the surface of the soil and can form adventitious roots that may lead to the development of new plants. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-701
400 printed copies | 6 pages | 2,238 words | 13 downloads | PDF: 530 kb


2015 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/14/2015 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. | PR-700
400 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,982 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 525 kb


2015 Red and White Clover Report
11/23/2015 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties generally are productive for 2.5 to 3 years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures and hay fields. This report provides current yield data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. | PR-695
500 printed copies | 6 pages | 2,805 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 875 kb


2015 Alfalfa Report
11/23/2015 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highestyielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. | PR-694
400 printed copies | 10 pages | 3,151 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


2014 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/2/2014 (new)

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of red and white clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-683
400 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,347 words | 13 downloads | PDF: 660 kb


2014 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/2/2014 (new)

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-682
400 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,278 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 550 kb


Managing Diseases of Alfalfa
12/1/2014 (new)

Alfalfa can be a vigorous and productive forage crop for Kentucky farmers. Like all farm crops, however, alfalfa is subject to infectious diseases that can limit forage production. Managing these diseases is an important part of economical alfalfa production. | PPFS-AG-F-9
web only | 4 pages | 1,658 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 756 kb


2014 Alfalfa Report
11/25/2014 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. | PR-676
500 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,769 words | 25 downloads | PDF: 1,780 kb


2014 Red and White Clover Report
11/24/2014 (new)

This report provides current yield data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. | PR-677
700 printed copies | 8 pages | 1,717 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 1,000 kb


Soybean Cyst Nematode Management Recommendations for Kentucky, 2015
11/1/2014 (reviewed)

SCN-resistant soybean varieties are an essential tool in the management of SCN. Although some of the early resistant varieties lagged behind susceptible varieties in yield, newer resistant varieties adapted for use in Kentucky do not suffer the same yield penalty. In fact, in the absence of SCN, it is common for modern SCN-resistant varieties to out-yield the best susceptible varieties in university research trials. | PPFS-AG-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 875 words | 1 download | PDF: 546 kb


Kentucky Plant Disease Management Guide for Forage Legumes
10/1/2014 (new)

Disease management in forage legumes relies heavily on using disease-resistant varieties and employing sound agronomic practices. It is important to integrate both of these strategies into a comprehensive disease management program. Failure to consider one or the other will compromise the success of your efforts. The appropriate use of pesticides sometimes plays a significant role in managing certain diseases, but it is secondary to sound cultural practices and proper variety selection. | PPFS-AG-F-8
web only | 7 pages | 2,707 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 907 kb


Kura Clover
3/1/2014 (minor revision)

Kura clover was investigated by the University of Kentucky Department of Plant and Soil Sciences for several years. Unfortunately, due to establishment difficulties, UK researchers have concluded that kura clover succeeds best further north. | CCD-CP-35
web only | 2 pages | 751 words | - | PDF: 389 kb


Fertilizer Management in Alfalfa
1/8/2014 (new)

Alfalfa is a high quality, valuable forage crop that can be successfully produced on most well-drained soils in Kentucky for hay, silage, and grazing. Fertilizing alfalfa can be uniquely challenging because it is a high-yielding crop that removes a tremendous amount of soil nutrients when compared to other crops grown in Kentucky. A thorough understanding of alfalfa's growth habits, nutrient requirements, and soil nutrient supply mechanisms is necessary to effectively manage fertilizer inputs and maximize profitability while minimizing environmental impact. | AGR-210
500 printed copies | 4 pages | 2,657 words | 44 downloads | PDF: 4 kb


2013 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
11/25/2013 (new)

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of red and white clover varieties when subjected to continuous grazing pressure. | PR-667
500 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,346 words | 24 downloads | PDF: 700 kb


2013 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
11/22/2013 (new)

This report summarizes research on the grazing tolerance of alfalfa varieties when subjected to continuous heavy grazing pressure during the grazing season. | PR-666
450 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,227 words | 16 downloads | PDF: 680 kb


2013 Red and White Clover Report
11/18/2013 (new)

This report provides current yield data on red and white clover varieties included in yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting clover varieties. | PR-661
800 printed copies | 8 pages | 1,727 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 960 kb


2013 Alfalfa Report
11/15/2013 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It is an important part of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. This report provides yield data on alfalfa varieties included in current yield trials in Kentucky as well as guidelines for selecting alfalfa varieties. | PR-660
600 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,781 words | 14 downloads | PDF: 1,950 kb


Red and White Clover
5/28/2013 (minor revision)

Red and white (ladino) clovers are high quality forage legumes with excellent feed value and animal palatability. Red clover (Trifolium pretense), a tall-growing and short-lived perennial, is used for hay, pasture, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitats. While white clover (Trifolium repens), a low-growing perennial, is best suited for grazing, it can also be used for soil improvement and reclaiming disturbed land. | CCD-CP-39
web only | 2 pages | 731 words | - | PDF: 512 kb


Soybean Foliar Spots and Blights
5/1/2013 (minor revision)

Soybean foliage is susceptible to a number of fungal and bacterial pathogens. These pathogens cause leaf spots and blights and are generally common in Kentucky; however, few fields in any given year are seriously damaged by foliar diseases. Crop rotation and weather that is unfavorable to disease typically keeps foliar diseases at low levels. Occasionally an extended period of wet and humid weather in July to early August will result in significant amounts of foliar disease and yields may be seriously affected. However, this scenario is relatively uncommon in Kentucky. | PPFS-AG-S-19
web only | 6 pages | 2,197 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 856 kb


Alfalfa
4/2/2013 (minor revision)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has the highest yield potential and highest feeding values of all adapted perennial forage legumes. It is a versatile crop that may be used for pasture, hay, silage, green-chop, pellets, cubes, soil improvement, and soil conservation. | CCD-CP-21
web only | 3 pages | 998 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 426 kb


Specialty Soybeans
3/19/2013 (minor revision)

The first commercial use of soybean (Glycine max) was for its oil; however, this crop is now considered a valuable source of protein as well. Specialty or novel soybeans are used to produce various soyfoods of Asian origin, such as tofu, miso, soy sauce, natto, soymilk, and tempeh. Assorted health food snacks, energy foods, and cereals are also produced from specialty soybeans. Other uses include bean sprouts and soy nuts. | CCD-CP-41
web only | 4 pages | 1,605 words | 1 download | PDF: 922 kb


2012 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/5/2012 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two and a half to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield, and animal acceptance. | PR-650
500 printed copies | 6 pages | 1,346 words | 13 downloads | PDF: 650 kb


2012 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/5/2012 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. | PR-649
500 printed copies | 8 pages | 1,227 words | 12 downloads | PDF: 670 kb


2012 Red and White Clover Report
11/26/2012 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties generally are productive for 2.5 to 3 years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, yield, and animal acceptance. | PR-644
800 printed copies | 10 pages | 1,750 words | 9 downloads | PDF: 1,260 kb


2012 Alfalfa Report
11/26/2012 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest-yielding, highest-quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. | PR-643
600 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,775 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 2,000 kb


Downy Mildew of Soybean
9/1/2012 (minor revision)

Small, irregular spots on upper leaf surfaces are initially pale yellow in appearance, later becoming gray-brown with a yellowish margin. On the underside of the leaves, the spots have a gray, fuzzy appearance due to the presence of the pathogen. These fungal-like tufts are reproductive structures of the organism and their appearance is diagnostic for this disease. Symptoms frequently occur at low levels throughout the crop canopy. Early leaf spots are non-descript and are commonly confused with leaf spots and pustules caused by soybean rust. | PPFS-AG-S-3
web only | 2 pages | 512 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 538 kb


Phytophthora Root and Stem Rot of Soybean
7/1/2012 (minor revision)

Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRSR), caused by Phythophthora sojae, is infrequently encountered in Kentucky. However, where it does occur, the disease can be quite destructive. Soon after planting, P. sojae can cause damping-off of germinating seeds and/or young seedlings. Severe stand loss often necessitates replanting. Alternately, this pathogen can infect and kill established plants of susceptible soybean varieties any time during the season. Varieties that have some resistance to P. sojae may be stunted, but rarely die. PRSR is primarily a problem in poorly drained fields (due to high clay content, "hard pan," and/or soil compaction) or areas of fields that are prone to flooding. | PPFS-AG-S-4
web only | 3 pages | 446 words | 1 download | PDF: 355 kb


Brown Spot of Soybean
6/1/2012 (minor revision)

Brown spot, caused by the fungus Septoria glycines, is present in all soybean fields in Kentucky. In most years the disease causes little to no yield impact; however, up to 15% yield losses can occur in select environments. For example, brown sport tends to be worse where soybeans follow no-till soybeans, where early-maturing varieties are planted, and/or when fields are planted in late April. River bottom fields or fields subject to fog or morning shade are frequently impacted. | PPFS-AG-S-1
web only | 2 pages | 666 words | 1 download | PDF: 420 kb


2011 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/23/2011 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. | PR-634
750 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,116 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 322 kb


2011 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/23/2011 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. | PR-633
750 printed copies | 4 pages | 1,058 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 402 kb


2011 Red and White Clover Report
12/19/2011 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two-and-a-half to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield, and animal acceptance. | PR-628
1,100 printed copies | 8 pages | 1,723 words | - | PDF: 313 kb


2011 Alfalfa Report
12/19/2011 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. | PR-627
1,000 printed copies | 12 pages | 1,763 words | 1 download | PDF: 322 kb


Seed Treatment Fungicides for Soybeans: Issues to Consider
4/1/2011 (minor revision)

Kentucky soybean producers frequently ask the question "Is it advisable to treat soybean seed with fungicides?" There is no pat answer to this question because of the many variables involved. Historically, soybean has not been treated to the same extent that corn and wheat have in the U.S. There are many good reasons for this, and some of them are discussed below. However, the trend is toward greater use of fungicide seed treatment on soybean, both in Kentucky and nationally. | PPFS-AG-S-12
web only | 3 pages | 974 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 400 kb


2010 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/15/2010 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two and a half to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield and animal acceptance. | PR-616
750 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 3 downloads | PDF: 260 kb


2010 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/15/2010 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Recent emphasis on its use as a grazing crop and the release of grazing-tolerant varieties have raised the following question: Do varieties differ in tolerance to grazing? We have chosen to use the standard tolerance test recommended by the North American Alfalfa Improvement Conference. This test uses continuous heavy grazing to sort out differences in grazing tolerance in a relatively short period of time. | PR-615
750 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 260 kb


2010 Red and White Clover Report
12/6/2010 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two-and-a-half to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield, and animal acceptance. | PR-610
1,100 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 260 kb


2010 Alfalfa Report
12/6/2010 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. | PR-609
1,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 300 kb


Soybean Loss Prediction Tool for Managing Soybean Rust
7/1/2010 (new)

Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a potentially devastating foliar disease of soybean. The disease was first detected in the Continental United States in the fall of 2004. Since that time, it has caused only sporadic yield losses in the U.S., primarily in the Gulf States. However, the potential still exists for devastating losses to occur in all soybean producing areas of the U.S. should the proper combination of weather conditions come together to support significant disease development by mid-summer. Currently, the only way to avert significant yield loss caused by SBR when disease risk is high is by applying foliar fungicides. | PPFS-AG-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,542 words | 1 download | PDF: 656 kb


Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines
6/1/2010 (minor revision)

Effective use of fungicides to control soybean rust is not very complicated. The whole idea is to wait to spray until the soybean rust risk is at least moderate, and make a fungicide application before significant infection has occurred. This means applying fungicides when plant pathologists in and around Kentucky are "sounding the alarm," but before symptoms are evident. Many soybean producers in the deep South have been using fungicides to control soybean rust since 2005 with considerable success. I believe we will have the same experience if it ever becomes necessary to apply fungicides for soybean rust in Kentucky. | PPFS-AG-S-23
web only | 2 pages | 407 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 473 kb


Soybean Diseases Control Series: Soybean Cyst Nematode
1/1/2010 (minor revision)

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) exists virtually everywhere soybean is grown in Kentucky. The pest is insidious in that significant yield damage often occurs without the appearance of visible disease symptoms. This is an extremely important point because it suggests that farmers are frequently unaware that SCN is active and doing damage in a field. | PPFS-AG-S-13
web only | 4 pages | 1,774 words | 1 download | PDF: 336 kb


2009 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
11/24/2009 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense) and white clover (Trifolium repens) are both high-quality forage legumes that are used primarily in mixed stands with tall fescue or orchardgrass for improving yield and quality of pastures. | PR-596
750 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 214 kb


2009 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
11/24/2009 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. | PR-595
1,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 216 kb


2009 Red and White Clover Report
11/24/2009 (new)

Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a high-quality, short-lived, perennial legume that is used in mixed or pure stands for pasture, hay, silage, green chop, soil improvement, and wildlife habitat. This species is adapted to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. Stands of improved varieties are generally productive for two to three years, with the highest yields occurring in the year following establishment. Red clover is used primarily as a renovation legume for grass pastures. It is a dominant forage legume in Kentucky because it is relatively easy to establish and has high forage quality, high yield, and animal acceptance. | PR-590
1,250 printed copies | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 271 kb


2009 Alfalfa Report
11/24/2009 (new)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has historically been the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef, and sheep diets. Choosing a good variety is a key step in establishing a stand of alfalfa. The choice of variety can impact yield, thickness of stand, and persistence. | PR-589
1,500 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 309 kb


Crown Rots of Alfalfa
5/1/2009 (minor revision)

Crown rots are chronic disease problems of alfalfa throughout the world. Crown rots cause loss of stand and forage yield in several ways. If the crowns are rotted severely enough, infected plants will die simply by being choked off. Carbohydrates for winter survival are stored in the crown and upper taproot. By rotting this area, crown rots also make alfalfa plants more sensitive to winter kill. Some crown rot fungi produce toxins, thus weakening or even killing the plant. | PPFS-AG-F-5
web only | 2 pages | 565 words | 1 download | PDF: 239 kb


Common Alfalfa Seedling Diseases and Disorders
3/1/2009 (minor revision)

Alfalfa seedlings are subject to a number of biotic and abiotic problems which can affect establishment. Several of the more common seedling diseases and disorders are described below. This information is being provided as a diagnostic aid; publications which provide specific management and production information can be found in the resource list. | PPFS-AG-F-3
web only | 2 pages | 639 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 115 kb


"Emergency" Inoculation for Poorly Inoculated Legumes
2/1/2009 (minor revision)

Frequently, stunted and yellowed legumes are thought by growers to be diseased. Close examination often reveals that such "diseased" plants are actually just poorly nodulated. | PPFS-AG-F-4
web only | 3 pages | 912 words | 1 download | PDF: 187 kb


2008 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/3/2008 (new)

| PR-580
1,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 200 kb


2008 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/3/2008 (new)

| PR-579
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 197 kb


2008 Red and White Clover Report
12/3/2008 (new)

| PR-574
1,750 printed copies | 10 pages | - | - | PDF: 230 kb


2008 Alfalfa Report
12/3/2008 (new)

| PR-573
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 250 kb


Risk Factors for Sclerotinia Crown and Stem Rot in Fall-Seeded Alfalfa
12/1/2008 (minor revision)

Alfalfa seeded during late summer or fall is susceptible to the destructive disease Sclerotinia crown and stem rot. Fall-seeded stands are particularly vulnerable to this disease because the young seedlings have not had sufficient time to develop adequate resistance before infectious spores of the pathogen are produced in late October. In contrast, spring-seeded stands are able to develop larger, more resistant crowns prior to this infectious period. Thus, spring plantings are better able to withstand an attack, should these air-borne spores be present in the field. | PPFS-AG-F-2
web only | 3 pages | 977 words | 1 download | PDF: 280 kb


Alfalfa Diseases Caused by Rhizoctonia Fungi
11/1/2008 (minor revision)

Rhizoctonia fungi, particularly Rhizoctonia solani, are found in most agricultural soils in Kentucky. These fungi are natural soil inhabitants that colonize and live on dead organic matter. Under the right environmental conditions, the Rhizoctonia organisms are often able to attack living plants, including alfalfa. When warm, wet conditions prevail, Rhizoctonia fungi can cause just about every conceivable type of alfalfa disease. | PPFS-AG-F-6
web only | 3 pages | 701 words | 1 download | PDF: 294 kb


Summertime Foliar Diseases of Alfalfa
11/1/2008 (minor revision)

Warm, humid weather can favor development of foliar diseases of alfalfa during summer. | PPFS-AG-F-1
web only | 2 pages | 409 words | 1 download | PDF: 194 kb


Southern Blight of Soybeans
10/1/2008 (minor revision)

Southern blight is a minor disease of soybeans in the United States. Although the disease can occur in plants anytime from emergence through pod fill, it most commonly occurs in isolated plants in the latter stages of reproductive development. Occasionally, southern blight develops when plants are in the early to mid-vegetative stages. When this occurs, the disease may spread rapidly down rows, resulting in serious stand losses in patches. However, even in the worst case scenario, it would be extremely rare for southern blight to cause measurable yield losses in a commercial soybean field. | PPFS-AG-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 641 words | 1 download | PDF: 207 kb


2007 Red and White Clover Report
12/15/2007 (new)

| PR-562
1,750 printed copies | 10 pages | - | - | PDF: 191 kb


2007 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/15/2007 (new)

| PR-560
1,000 printed copies | 7 pages | - | - | PDF: 148 kb


2007 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/12/2007 (new)

| PR-559
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 133 kb


2007 Alfalfa Report
11/16/2007 (new)

| PR-556
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 205 kb


2006 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-546
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 4 downloads | PDF: 136 kb


2006 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
12/15/2006 (new)

| PR-545
1,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 136 kb


2006 Red and White Clover Report
12/6/2006 (new)

| PR-540
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | - | PDF: 197 kb


2006 Alfalfa Report
12/6/2006 (new)

| PR-539
2,500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 212 kb


2005 Alfalfa Report
1/20/2006 (reprinted)

| PR-522
1,800 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 450 kb


2005 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
1/5/2006 (new)

| PR-529
1,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 130 kb


2005 Red and White Clover Report
1/5/2006 (new)

| PR-527
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | - | PDF: 206 kb


2005 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
12/30/2005 (new)

| PR-526
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 154 kb


2004 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Report
2/20/2005 (new)

| PR-514
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 284 kb


2004 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
2/20/2005 (new)

| PR-513
1,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 275 kb


2004 Red and White Clover Report
1/30/2005 (new)

| PR-508
2,000 printed copies | 10 pages | - | - | PDF: 648 kb


2004 Alfalfa Report
1/30/2005 (new)

| PR-506
2,500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 3 downloads | PDF: 521 kb


Weed Control Strategies for Alfalfa and Other Forage Legume Crops
4/1/2004 (reprinted)

| AGR-148
1,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 18 downloads | PDF: 154 kb


2003 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
4/1/2004 (reprinted)

| PR-499
300 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 77 kb


2003 Red Clover Report
4/1/2004 (reprinted)

| PR-490
300 printed copies | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 252 kb


2003 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
1/10/2004 (new)

| PR-498
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 78 kb


2003 Alfalfa Report
12/24/2003 (new)

| PR-489
2,500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 107 kb


Alfalfa the Queen of Forage Crops
4/1/2003 (reprinted)

| AGR-76
1,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 28 downloads | PDF: 108 kb


2002 Red and White Clover Grazing Tolerance Report
3/31/2003 (new)

| PR-481
600 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 5 downloads | PDF: 72 kb


2002 Red Clover Report
1/10/2003 (new)

| PR-473
3,500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 102 kb


2002 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
1/10/2003 (new)

| PR-472
2,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 72 kb


2002 Alfalfa Report
1/5/2003 (new)

| PR-471
3,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 185 kb


Inoculation of Forage Legumes
11/22/2002 (minor revision)

| AGR-90
1,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 6 downloads | PDF: 110 kb


Grazing Alfalfa
11/1/2002 (reprinted)

| ID-97
2,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 34 downloads | PDF: 152 kb


2001 Red Clover Report
8/1/2002 (reprinted)

| PR-454
500 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 79 kb


2001 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
5/13/2002 (reprinted)

| PR-461
50 printed copies | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 64 kb


2001 Alfalfa Report
5/13/2002 (reprinted)

| PR-453
500 printed copies | 16 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 209 kb


Growing Red Clover in Kentucky
1/31/2002 (reprinted)

| AGR-33
2,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 16 downloads | PDF: 108 kb


Alfalfa Cubes for Horses
5/1/2001 (reprinted)

| ID-145
1,500 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 24 downloads | PDF: 310 kb


2000 Alfalfa Report
1/15/2001 (new)

| PR-440
3,000 printed copies | 16 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 398 kb


2000 Red Clover Report
1/10/2001 (new)

| PR-441
3,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 247 kb


2000 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
1/1/2001 (new)

| PR-438
2,200 printed copies | 4 pages | - | - | PDF: 186 kb


An Alfalfa Disease Calendar
5/1/2000 (new)

| PPA-44
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 6 downloads | PDF: 168 kb


1999 Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
1/31/2000 (new)

| PR-427
2,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 226 kb


1999 Red Clover Report
12/31/1999 (new)

| PR-426
4,000 printed copies | 6 pages | - | - | PDF: 97 kb


1999 Alfalfa Report
12/15/1999 (new)

| PR-425
4,000 printed copies | 14 pages | - | - | PDF: 244 kb


The 1998 Kura Clover Report
10/15/1999 (new)

| PR-419
3,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 188 kb


Alfalfa Grazing Tolerance Variety Report
4/1/1999 (new)

| PR-415
2,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 74 kb


1998 Red Clover Report
1/15/1999 (new)

| PR-412
4,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 78 kb


1998 Alfalfa Report
1/15/1999 (new)

| PR-411
4,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 188 kb


1997 Red Clover Report
2/1/1998 (new)

| PR-400
4,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 67 kb


1997 Alfalfa Report
2/1/1998 (new)

| PR-399
4,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | 2 downloads | PDF: 153 kb


Kura Clover for Kentucky
4/1/1997 (minor revision)

| AGR-141
2,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 16 downloads | PDF: 203 kb


1996 Alfalfa Variety Trials
12/1/1996 (new)

| PR-390
4,000 printed copies | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 172 kb


1996 Red Clover Variety Trials
12/1/1996 (new)

| PR-389
4,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 165 kb


Growing White Clover in Kentucky
11/1/1996 (minor revision)

| AGR-93
2,000 printed copies | 2 pages | - | 12 downloads | PDF: 184 kb


Producing Red Clover Seed in Kentucky
11/1/1996 (new)

| AGR-2
web only | 4 pages | - | 7 downloads | PDF: 144 kb


1995 Alfalfa Variety Trials
12/1/1995 (new)

| PR-380
4,000 printed copies | 14 pages | - | - | PDF: 83 kb


1995 Red Clover Variety Trials
12/1/1995 (new)

| PR-379
4,000 printed copies | 15 pages | - | - | PDF: 63 kb


1994 Red Clover Variety Trials
2/1/1995 (reprinted)

| PR-369
1,000 printed copies | 11 pages | - | - | PDF: 43 kb


1994 Alfalfa Variety Trials
12/1/1994 (new)

| PR-370
web only | 15 pages | - | - | PDF: 18 kb


1993 Alfalfa Variety Trials
12/1/1993 (new)

| PR-359
web only | 15 pages | - | - | PDF: 77 kb


1993 Red Clover Variety Trials
12/1/1993 (new)

| PR-358
web only | 12 pages | - | - | PDF: 45 kb


1992 Red Clover Variety Trials
3/1/1993 (new)

| PR-349
web only | 13 pages | - | - | PDF: 37 kb


1992 Alfalfa Variety Trials
2/1/1993 (new)

| PR-351
web only | 14 pages | - | - | PDF: 63 kb


Growing Lespedeza in Kentucky
8/1/1992 (minor revision)

| AGR-86
4,000 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 18 downloads | PDF: 146 kb


1991 Red Clover Variety Trials
2/1/1992 (new)

| PR-339
2,000 printed copies | 8 pages | - | - | PDF: 20 kb


1991 Alfalfa Variety Trials
12/1/1991 (new)

| PR-340
web only | 7 pages | - | 1 download | PDF: 25 kb


'Fergus' Birdsfoot Trefoil
6/30/1984 (reprinted)

| AGR-104
5,000 printed copies | - | - | 6 downloads | HTML: 18 kb