University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Not a complete list as of 8-30-17.

Tag: nursery and landscape



Reducing Heat Stress to Container-Grown Plants
11/14/2017 (new)

Production of plants in containers offer many advantages over field production. Shorter production cycles, larger numbers of plants per acre, and the ability to continuously market and ship plants are among those advantages. However, there are some disadvantages including more intense cultural practices, a relatively short window of optimum marketability due to container size restrictions, and rapid daily temperature fluctuations within the container substrate (growing medium). This publication will provide information about plant response to high root-zone temperatures, identify critical temperatures, describe the factors that influence temperature fluctuations, and suggest cultural practices to reduce heat stress in container-grown plants. | HO-119
web only | 6 pages | 3,953 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,240 kb


Stevia
9/5/2017 (minor revision)

Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) is a small, herbaceous plant in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It is a perennial in its native South America, but is grown as an annual in all but the warmest areas of the United States. Stevia is commonly called "sweetleaf" or "sugarleaf." | CCD-CP-55
web only | 4 pages | 1,145 words | - | PDF: 791 kb


Woody Cuts
8/22/2017 (minor revision)

Woody cuts are portions of woody ornamentals used for floral or decorative purposes. These include foliage, flowering branches, fruit and seeds, as well as bare stems and branches. Numerous shrubs, trees, and woody vines can be grown commercially for these purposes. Cut flower growers may want to add woody cuts to their production line to diversify their products, expand their markets, and extend the floral season. Growers will need to be familiar with the different production and harvest requirements of a diverse group of plant material. | CCD-CP-76
web only | 3 pages | 1,519 words | - | PDF: 909 kb


Garden Mums
7/13/2017 (minor revision)

The garden mum (Chrysanthemum spp.) is a popular herbaceous perennial flowering plant that is commonly grown for fall sales. While also referred to as 'hardy mums,' their actual hardiness outdoors (that is, their ability to survive the winter) can vary by cultivar, time of planting, and environmental conditions. Garden mums are generally container-grown in Kentucky, either in a greenhouse or outdoors in connection with a greenhouse business; there is also some field production in the state. | CCD-CP-71
web only | 3 pages | 969 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 1,500 kb


Hydroponic Lettuce
6/30/2017 (minor revision)

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is one of the most commonly grown hydroponic vegetables. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants without soil. Plants may be grown in a nutrient solution only (liquid culture) or they may be supported by an inert medium (aggregate culture). In both systems all of the plants' nutritional needs are supplied through the irrigation water. | CCD-CP-63
web only | 4 pages | 1,872 words | 9 downloads | PDF: 1,300 kb


Propagation Nursery
6/5/2017 (minor revision)

Propagation nurseries produce pre-finished plant material (liners), such as ornamental trees, shrubs, and grasses, fruit trees, and annual and perennial flowers. Plants are propagated either by seed or by vegetative means, such as by cuttings, grafting, or tissue culture. Some nurseries specialize in growing and selling pre-finished plants to other growers, making propagation their sole business. However, some wholesale nursery operations have their own propagation areas where plants are produced for in-house use. | CCD-SP-8
web only | 4 pages | 1,739 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 1,900 kb


Optimizing Bermudagrass Athletic Field Winter Survival in the Transition Zone
5/31/2017 (new)

Bermudagrass is an excellent choice for use on athletic fields throughout the transition zone (which includes Virginia, Kentucky, southern Indiana, and Missouri) because of its tolerance to close cutting heights, summer vigor, positive traction characteristics for athletes, resistance to divoting and ability to withstand and recover from significant traffic during active growth. The major limitation to successful bermudagrass persistence in transition zone locations is a general lack of cold tolerance and susceptibility to winterkill. | AGR-228
web only | 10 pages | 4,267 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 6,633 kb


Lavender
4/25/2017 (new)

Large-scale lavender production in Kentucky is limited by climatic requirements (low humidity and low winter temperatures ), poorly drained soils and the scale requirements for essential oils processing. Lavender could be suited as a specialty/niche crop for some Kentucky farms, especially those with ongoing agritourism enterprises. Marketing constraints and the scale requirements for essential oils processing make lavender more likely suited as a crop for ornamental or on-farm agritourism potential (lavender festivals) in Kentucky. | CCD-CP-127
web only | 3 pages | 1,339 words | 26 downloads | PDF: 897 kb


Field Nursery Production
4/17/2017 (minor revision)

Field nurseries are the traditional method of producing and marketing ornamental trees, shrubs, fruit trees, and perennial flowers. Until the mid 1900s nearly all nursery crops were produced in the field. Even with the advent of aboveground container and pot-in-pot production, field nurseries are still widely used. Some of the advantages of field production over other production methods include: less maintenance and labor requirements during the growing period, ability of plants to overwinter in the field without additional protective measures, and lower start-up costs. In Kentucky, most field-grown trees and shrubs are sold as balled-and-burlapped (B&B), meaning that the soil surrounding the plant's root system is dug with the plant and wrapped in burlap. | CCD-SP-6
web only | 5 pages | 2,198 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 1,100 kb


Container Nursery Production
4/17/2017 (minor revision)

The container nursery business involves the production and marketing of ornamental trees and shrubs, fruit trees, and perennial flowers grown in aboveground containers. This production method has helped revolutionize the nursery business in the last few decades. Some of the advantages of container production include: less acreage required for production, handling convenience, and a nearly year-round harvest and planting season. | CCD-SP-5
web only | 5 pages | 1,123 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 1,700 kb


Pot-in-Pot Nursery Production
1/31/2017 (minor revision)

"Pot-in-pot" describes a nursery production system that uses containers (production pots) placed inside permanent in-ground containers (socket pots). Pot-in-pot is used for the production of caliper-sized shade trees, flowering trees, and large shrubs. The pot-in-pot system combines many of the benefits of field production with the marketing flexibility of container production. Container-grown plants can be sold at any time of year and with relatively short notice, whereas harvesting of field-grown plants requires more planning and is typically not done during the summer or extremely wet periods. | CCD-SP-7
web only | 5 pages | 2,325 words | 14 downloads | PDF: 918 kb


Turfgrass Weed Control for Professionals, 2017
1/19/2017 (new)

This newly expanded guide provides weed identification and control information that turfgrass professionals can use to develop effective weed control programs for golf courses, athletic fields, sod farms, lawns, and other turfgrass systems. The recommendations apply to the majority of the United States, with input from experts in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Available for purchase from Purdue University. | AGR-225
web only | 96 pages | - | 26 downloads | PDF: kb


Greenhouse-grown Specialty Cut Flowers
11/11/2016 (minor revision)

"Specialty cut flowers" generally refers to cut flower species other than roses, carnations, and chrysanthemums. Some of the specialty cut flowers that can be grown successfully in Kentucky greenhouses, or other protected environments such as high tunnels, include anemone (Anemone spp.), Asiatic or oriental lilies (Lilium spp.), bachelor button or cornflower (Centaurea spp.), celosia or cockscomb (Celosia spp.), coral bell (Heuchera hybrids), freesia (Freesia hybrids), larkspur (Delphinium spp.), lisianthus (Eustoma spp.), snapdragon (Antirrhinum spp.), pollenless sunflowers (Helianthis annus) and zinnias (Zinnia spp.), and sweetpea (Lathyrus odoratus). | CCD-CP-58
web only | 3 pages | 1,298 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 503 kb


Ginseng
9/1/2016 (minor revision)

Ginseng is a perennial herb that has been used for medicinal purposes in China and other Asian countries for centuries. American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is native to the rich hardwood forests of Canada and the eastern half of the United States, including Kentucky. Today Kentucky leads the nation in wild ginseng production. While wild American ginseng is not yet considered endangered, it is protected by federal and state laws. Because ginseng regulations are subject to change, the State Ginseng Coordinator in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) should be contacted for the latest laws and restrictions. Additionally, laws will vary from state to state; the information in this profile is pertinent to Kentucky only. | CCD-CP-53
web only | 6 pages | 2,459 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 967 kb


Goldenseal
4/15/2016 (minor revision)

Kentucky is a major harvester of wild goldenseal. Unfortunately, a decline in native populations has occurred as demand and harvesting pressure has increased. Like ginseng, goldenseal is listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) agreement. As such, international trade of goldenseal is closely controlled to prevent over-exploitation that could lead to further endangering the species. | CCD-CP-54
web only | 4 pages | 1,799 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 582 kb


Christmas Trees
8/18/2015 (minor revision)

Christmas trees can be grown on relatively small parcels of land. This enterprise can fit in well with an existing farm or nursery operation. While Christmas tree production does have a high profitability potential, it is also a long-term, risky investment requiring periods of intensive labor. | CCD-CP-67
web only | 4 pages | 1,569 words | 1 download | PDF: 492 kb


Turfgrasses of Kentucky
8/17/2015 (new)

Roughly 7,500 grass species are grown around the world, but only 14 species are adapted as turfgrasses that have been used extensively. Kentucky is situated in the transitional climatic zone of the United States, the middle point between the cool north and the warm south, with warm summers and cool winters. Because of its unusual climate, no single grass is suitable for all situations and locations. The majority of the turfgrasses that are appropriate for use in Kentucky are known as C3 grasses, or cool-season grasses. Cool-season grasses differ from warm-season grasses (C4) in many ways, but most notably in their photosynthetic pathways. Warm-season grasses can tolerate and even thrive during the warm summers while cool-season grasses may become heat-stressed. Conversely, winters in Kentucky may be too cool for warm-season grasses and greenup in the spring may be long and arduous. Warm-season grasses enter a dormancy period during the fall and winter and may stay in this state as long as six or seven months. | AGR-216
web only | 12 pages | 3,123 words | 63 downloads | PDF: 8,500 kb


Echinacea
6/1/2015 (minor revision)

Coneflowers (Echinacea spp.) are herbaceous perennials with large daisy-like flowers. There are nine species of coneflower and all are native to central or eastern North America. Purple coneflower (E. purpurea), a well-known garden flower, is extensively cultivated in nurseries. This hardy ornamental is commonly planted in both home and commercial landscapes. Coneflowers are also effective, long lasting cut flowers. Some species (E. angustifolia, E. purpurea, and E. pallida) are also prized commercially for their reported medicinal properties. | CCD-CP-52
web only | 5 pages | 2,285 words | - | PDF: 1,400 kb


Herbicide Recommendations for Weed Control in Kentucky Bluegrass and Tall Fescue Lawns for Professional Applicators
3/30/2015 (new)

The best method to control weeds is to grow a dense and healthy lawn. This objective should be primary for turf professionals. Lawn weed control is facilitated by identification of the turfgrass and weed species present. Not all herbicides will control all weeds, and not all herbicides are safe on all lawn grasses. This publication contains herbicide recommendations for licensed professionals. For information on weed control for non-professionals, see AGR 208: Weed Control for Kentucky Home Lawns. | AGR-218
web only | 4 pages | 1,478 words | 53 downloads | PDF: 240 kb


Field-grown Cut Flowers
11/26/2014 (minor revision)

Cut flowers include not only fresh and dried flowers, but also any plant part used for floral or decorative purposes, such as seed heads, stalks, and woody cuts. Cut flowers are well-suited to small-scale production and are a good way to diversify or expand an existing farm operation. Specialty cut flowers can be sold by the stem, in bunches, or in mixed bouquets. | CCD-CP-70
web only | 4 pages | 1,521 words | - | PDF: 652 kb


Hanging Baskets
11/26/2014 (minor revision)

Incorporating hanging baskets in with bedding plant production enables growers to generate income from otherwise unused space above benches and in walkways. Hanging baskets can fetch a higher price (on a per plant basis) than small pots and can, therefore, enhance the profitability of greenhouse bedding plant operations. In some cases, growers may devote whole greenhouses or sections of greenhouses to hanging basket production. | CCD-CP-59
web only | 4 pages | 1,460 words | - | PDF: 631 kb


Bedding Plants
5/31/2014 (minor revision)

Hundreds of different annuals, perennials, herbs, and vegetable transplants can be grown and sold as bedding plants. In general the term 'bedding plant' refers to any plant that is produced and sold for planting in the landscape, garden, or large containers (such as patio pots). | CCD-CP-56
web only | 3 pages | 1,203 words | - | PDF: 1,100 kb


Poinsettias
5/1/2014 (minor revision)

Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) are subtropical plants which originated in Mexico and Guatemala. In their native climate, poinsettias are small woody shrubs that may reach a height of over 10 feet. In the U.S. poinsettias are grown as indoor potted plants popular at Christmas time. While the showy bracts are suggestive of flower petals, they are really modified leaves. The actual poinsettia flowers are less conspicuous by comparison, forming a yellow to red cluster in the center of the bracts. | CCD-CP-64
web only | 3 pages | 1,262 words | - | PDF: 409 kb


Ornamental Corn
4/24/2014 (minor revision)

Ornamental corn (Zea mays) production currently represents a new crop for Kentucky, in terms of limited University of Kentucky research. There are many kinds of ornamental corn, varying in ear size, kernel color, husk, and stalk color. Some cultivars have red or purple stalks and leaves that are sold for decorative purposes. | CCD-CP-72
web only | 3 pages | 984 words | - | PDF: 643 kb


Willows for Cuttings
7/18/2013 (minor revision)

Willows (Salix spp.), well known for their flexible and vigorous growth, have long been popular in basket and furniture making. A versatile woody plant, various species can also be used for trellises, fencing, floral arrangements, and artistic sculptures. Its fast growth makes willow a popular landscape ornamental, as well as a potential bioenergy crop. This profile will emphasize the production of willows for live cuttings and dried rods. | CCD-CP-75
web only | 3 pages | 1,137 words | 1 download | PDF: 430 kb


Ornamental Grasses
7/17/2013 (minor revision)

Ornamental grasses are popular for use in commercial and homeowner landscapes. Attractive foliage, showy flowers, and distinctive seed heads make many annual and perennial grasses suitable for fresh and dried floral arrangements. Ornamental grasses can be added to an existing nursery operation or become the focus of a specialty nursery. | CCD-CP-73
web only | 3 pages | 1,193 words | - | PDF: 477 kb


Starting a Nursery Business
7/15/2013 (minor revision)

The nursery business involves the production and marketing of various plants including trees, shrubs, grasses, perennial and annual flowers, and fruit trees. A landscaping service, garden center, or sod farm may also be associated with a nursery enterprise. A successful nursery operator must be knowledgeable about all phases of plant production and be willing to work long, hard days. Good marketing and management skills are essential. A passion for ornamental plants and an entrepreneurial spirit add greatly to the chances for success. | CCD-SP-9
web only | 5 pages | 2,329 words | 1 download | PDF: 614 kb


Selected Resources and References for Commercial Greenhouse Operators
4/18/2013 (minor revision)

Books can be obtained from the publisher (known links are provided), by ordering through a local bookstore, or by ordering through an industry trade magazine (books are generally advertised in each issue). Book sources can also be located by searching the Internet using the title as the keyword. | CCD-SP-4
web only | 3 pages | 862 words | - | PDF: 553 kb


Bamboo
4/5/2013 (minor revision)

Edible young bamboo shoots are used in cooking, while mature canes (or culms) are harvested for timber uses that include fences, stakes, fishing poles, crafts, flooring, and furniture. Because they are capable of removing high levels of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, bamboos are being promoted for their environmental benefits. | CCD-CP-77
web only | 4 pages | 1,968 words | - | PDF: 442 kb


Edible Flowers
9/5/2012 (minor revision)

Edible flowers can complement a cut flower or herb business, providing additional opportunities for value-added products. However, they require a specialized niche market that may take some time to develop. Flowers intended for human consumption must be grown without pesticides, providing organic growers a production edge. Plant material obtained from most commercial florists, garden centers, and nurseries is not pesticide-free and, therefore, is NOT suitable for consumption. | CCD-CP-69
web only | 3 pages | 1,337 words | 1 download | PDF: 396 kb


Turfgrass Sod Production
7/18/2011 (minor revision)

The demand for sod is highly dependent on new housing starts and industrial development. Because turfgrass is highly perishable once harvested, it cannot be shipped long distances, thus favoring local production. Most Kentucky-grown sod is marketed locally and little is either exported to or imported from neighboring states. While temporary sod shortages may occur, there is generally no consistent shortage of cultivated sod in Kentucky, indicating that current production is meeting demand. The market is extremely tight and new growers will have to produce a better quality turfgrass at a lower price in order to compete. | CCD-CP-74
web only | 3 pages | 928 words | 1 download | PDF: 475 kb


Poinsettia Diseases
5/1/2010 (minor revision)

Poinsettias grown through the fall months for Christmas sales are vulnerable to destructive diseases from the time the cuttings are stuck into the rooting media until they are mature and ready for sale. A number of poinsettia diseases are favored by the same environmental conditions that promote propagation, making plant material at this stage particularly vulnerable. Diseases occurring in the later stages of production can be related to management issues or cultural problems, as well as the cooler temperatures needed for finishing. Some other diseases can be problematic to poinsettias at any phase of production. And finally, a phytoplasma organism found associated with poinsettias provides evidence that some host/pathogen relationships can actually be economically beneficial. | PPFS-GH-6
web only | 6 pages | 1,122 words | - | PDF: 1,335 kb