University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Tag: organic production



Economic Analysis of the University of Kentucky Community Supported Agriculture Organic Vegetable Production System
7/12/2017 (new)

Farms marketing through a vegetable CSA are complex businesses facing many operational and economic challenges. To be economically viable, CSA farms must achieve the appropriate match of crops, equipment, and labor with farm size and number of CSA members. A diverse array of vegetable crops are typically grown with unique requirements for crop production, pest management, harvest, and post-harvest handling. An extensive suite of skills, tools, and equipment are required to produce these crops efficiently, and mechanization becomes critical as the number of acres in production increases. | SR-111
200 printed copies | 28 pages | 8,907 words | 12 downloads | PDF: 6,500 kb


Organic Tomatoes
11/23/2016 (minor revision)

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are one of the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky. With the rising consumer demand for organic products, organic tomatoes should be an excellent prospect for local fresh market sales. | CCD-CP-111
web only | 6 pages | 2,698 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 566 kb


Organic Sweet Corn
11/23/2016 (minor revision)

Organic sweet corn is produced using pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic pesticides or petroleum-based fertilizers. Because organic crop production standards are regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP), growers producing and selling sweet corn labeled "organic" must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency. While there are benefits to using the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) for the certification process, Kentucky residents can be certified by any approved agency operating in the Commonwealth. | CCD-CP-110
web only | 4 pages | 1,786 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 604 kb


Organic Blackberries and Raspberries
11/3/2016 (new)

Blackberries and raspberries (both Rubus spp.) are included in the group of small fruits generally referred to as "brambles" or "caneberries." Erect (thorny and thornless), thorny primocane fruiting, and semi-erect (thornless) blackberries, as well as fall bearing raspberries, present an opportunity for organic production in Kentucky. Pests, especially spotted wing drosophila (SWD), present the greatest challenge for organic bramble production. | CCD-CP-12
web only | 5 pages | 2,523 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 799 kb


Organic Lettuce and Leafy Greens
8/5/2016 (minor revision)

Leafy greens and lettuce, which are among the most popular fresh market vegetables grown commercially in Kentucky, have excellent potential for organic production. Organic crops are produced using integrated pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling lettuce and greens with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state agency (e.g. the Kentucky Department of Agriculture) or private agency, plus follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). | CCD-CP-109
web only | 6 pages | 2,797 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 575 kb


Organic Asparagus
6/1/2016 (minor revision)

Asparagus is grown primarily in Kentucky for fresh market, especially near large population centers. Potential markets for organic asparagus include roadside stands, farmers markets, cooperatives, community supported agriculture (CSA) subscriptions, produce auctions, and local wholesalers. Restaurants, health food stores, and locally owned grocers may also be interested in Kentucky-grown organic products. Kentucky's market window for asparagus, which varies depending on region, can start as early as April and run through the month of June. | CCD-CP-108
web only | 4 pages | 2,131 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 513 kb


Backyard Berry Disease and Disease Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-25
web only | 4 pages | 1,260 words | 32 downloads | PDF: 1,037 kb


Backyard Grape Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 1,263 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,213 kb


Backyard Stone Fruit Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,234 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 890 kb


Backyard Apple Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-21
web only | 4 pages | 1,311 words | 27 downloads | PDF: 1,013 kb


Organic Corn Production in Kentucky
1/15/2015 (new)

The number of organic dairy cows in Kentucky has been steadily increasing for years, yet there's not enough organic corn produced in the state to feed the growing herds. In short, a new market has developed in the state, but few local farmers are taking advantage of it. While Kentucky farmers are no strangers to corn, growing corn organically utilizes different management, cultural and marketing practices and requires new skills. And, importantly, organic production must follow an approved farm plan that allows farmers to sell their corn as certified organic. This publication is designed to be both an introduction to a new enterprise as well as a practical manual for those interested in pursuing organic corn production on their own farms. | ID-225
2,000 printed copies | 30 pages | 19,856 words | 47 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Organic Blueberries
8/20/2014 (minor revision)

The highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub that will do well in most areas of Kentucky as long as the soil pH is properly adjusted. Organic production requires the use of pest management and fertilization methods that do not include synthetic compounds. Growers producing and selling their berries with an organic label must be certified by a USDA-approved state or private agency and follow production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). | CCD-CP-13
web only | 6 pages | 2,842 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 633 kb


Marketing Organic Produce
6/27/2014 (minor revision)

Growth in organic food consumption has been a major trend in the U.S. food industry during the last two decades. Sales of organic food rose from $3.6 billion in 1997 to $21.1 billion in 2007. Sales of organic food products were estimated at $28.4 billion in 2012 and approaching $35 billion in 2014. | CCD-MP-9
web only | 5 pages | 1,687 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,200 kb


Organic Certification Process
4/14/2014 (minor revision)

Growers who plan to market their agricultural products as "organic" or "certified organic" must first be certified by a USDA accredited certifier. Certification, required by federal regulation, provides third party verification that the grower is complying with production standards regulated by the National Organic Program (NOP). Annual inspections and detailed record keeping are required for continuing certification. These strict regulations are meant to protect consumers by ensuring that all organic producers are adhering to the same set of uniform standards. | CCD-SP-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,334 words | - | PDF: 430 kb


Organic Gardening: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 18
5/7/2012 (new)

Organic gardening offers the gardener many benefits--a safe, low-chemical gardening environment, produce free from synthetic pesticide residues, and gardens that can increase in fertility and natural pest control over time. However, reaping the benefits of organic management requires planning, observation, and thinking about the garden as an interconnected system of soils, plants, pests, and beneficial organisms. | HO-100
web only | 12 pages | 5,684 words | 96 downloads | PDF: 615 kb


Organic Corn for Feed or Food
2/14/2011 (new)

Organic white and yellow food grade corn is produced for use in organic cereals, tortillas, corn chips, snack foods, cornmeal, and other corn-based processed products. Organic corn is also used as animal feed in organic beef, dairy, poultry, and hog production | CCD-CP-37
web only | 6 pages | 2,534 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 467 kb


Home Composting: A Guide to Managing Organic Wastes
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

| HO-75
web only | 4 pages | - | 62 downloads | PDF: 263 kb


Low-Maintenance Lawn Care, Stressing Pest Avoidance and Organic Inputs
3/15/2005 (reprinted)

This publication is written for those who wish to maintain their lawn with minimal inputs. Low-maintenance lawn care offers certain benefits, such as minimal pesticide use, reduced fertilizer input, less need for irrigation, and reduced mowing frequency. However, when choosing a low-maintenance approach, recognize that the lawn will not offer the same dark green, uniform sward of turf that is seen under a high-maintenance lawn-care program. | ID-154
2,500 printed copies | 6 pages | - | 19 downloads | PDF: 176 kb