University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
 

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Not a complete list as of 8-30-17.

Tag: plant diseases



Cane Diseases of Brambles
11/1/2017 (major revision)

Anthracnose can cause severe damage to blackberries, purple and black raspberries, and to a much lesser extent, red raspberries in Kentucky. When left unchecked, anthracnose can significantly reduce overall yields, as well as limit the longevity of bramble plantings. Disease also causes loss of winter hardiness. | PPFS-FR-S-17
web only | 5 pages | 800 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 299 kb


Holcus Leaf Spot
10/11/2017 (new)

Holcus leaf spot, a bacterial disease, can be seen sporadically in Kentucky cornfields, and it is challenging to diagnose. This publication describes the disease symptoms, conditions that favor disease, and how to distinguish holcus spot from herbicide injury that can mimic this disease. | PPFS-AG-C-6
web only | 3 pages | 483 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 889 kb


Diplodia Ear Rot
10/11/2017 (new)

Diplodia ear rot can reduce yield and grain quality by damaging kernels, lowering grain test weight, and reducing grain fill. Incidence of affected ears in the field can vary from 1% or 2% to as high as 80%. Although mycotoxins have been associated with Diplodia ear rot in South America and South Africa, there have been no reports of livestock feeding issues due to mycotoxins linked to Diplodia ear rot in the United States. | PPFS-AG-C-5
web only | 3 pages | 514 words | - | PDF: 990 kb


Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Corn Diseases
9/28/2017 (new)

The Corn Disease Working Group (CDWG) developed ratings for how well fungicides control major corn diseases in the United States. The CDWG determined efficacy ratings for each fungicide listed in the table by field testing the materials over multiple years and locations. Ratings are based on the product's level of disease control and does not necessarily reflect yield increases obtained from product application. A product's efficacy depends upon proper application timing, rate, and application method as determined by the product label and overall disease level in the field at the time of application. | PPA-49
web only | 2 pages | 690 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 1,120 kb


Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Wheat Diseases
9/28/2017 (new)

The North Central Regional Committee on Management of Small Grain Diseases (NCERA-184) has developed the following information about fungicide efficacy for the control of certain foliar diseases of wheat for use by the grain production industry in the United States. The efficacy ratings for each fungicide listed in this table were determined by field testing the materials over multiple years and locations by the members of the committee. | PPA-48
web only | 2 pages | 649 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,400 kb


Commercial Strawberry Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide
8/1/2017 (new)

A fungicide spray guide and worksheet for commercial strawberry growers. | PPFS-FR-S-26
web only | 2 pages | 419 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 230 kb


Volutella Blight of Boxwood
8/1/2017 (new)

Volutella blight (also called Pseudonectria canker) is the most common disease of boxwood in Kentucky landscapes and nurseries. This disease is caused by an opportunistic fungal pathogen that attacks leaves and stems of damaged or stressed plants. Winter injury, poor vigor, and stem wounds increase risk for Volutella blight. All species and cultivars of boxwood are susceptible. | PPFS-OR-W-26
web only | 4 pages | 226 words | 1 download | PDF: 1,568 kb


Flowering Dogwood Diseases
8/1/2017 (major revision)

The flowering dogwood is one of the most popular ornamental trees in Kentucky landscapes. Different cultivars, as well as different species and hybrids, offer a variety of flower and plant characteristics. Unfortunately, some common diseases can threaten the health of dogwood in both residential and commercial settings. | PPFS-OR-W-6
web only | 6 pages | 586 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 500 kb


Dothistroma Needle Blight of Pine
7/1/2017 (new)

Dothistroma needle blight disease afflicts some of the pine species commonly planted in Kentucky landscapes, resulting in needle browning and unattractive trees. Austrian pine and Mugo pine are most commonly affected. Dothistroma needle blight is infrequently observed on spruce. A closely related fungal disease called brown spot needle blight occasionally affects Scots pine or white pine, although this disease is less common in Kentucky. | PPFS-OR-W-25
web only | 3 pages | 256 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,053 kb


Managing Diseases of Herbaceous Ornamentals
5/1/2017 (new)

Herbaceous landscape ornamentals can succumb to various adverse factors, including infectious and non-infectious diseases. Infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms, such as fungi, fungus-like water molds, bacteria, nematodes, viruses, and phytoplasmas. Abiotic or non-infectious diseases may be attributed to unfavorable growing conditions, which can include nutritional deficiencies, improper soil pH, extreme temperatures, excessive soil moisture, or drought. In order to determine the proper course of action for treatment, it is essential to accurately identify the specific cause(s). | PPFS-OR-H-1
web only | 19 pages | 669 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 3,137 kb


Sampling for the Tall Fescue Endophyte in Pasture or Hay Stands
4/10/2017 (minor revision)

Most of the tall fescue growing in Kentucky is colonized by the tall fescue endophyte, a fungus which causes disorders in livestock that feed on the infected grass. The animal disease syndrome is called fescue toxicosis, which some researchers estimate may cost Kentucky producers over $200 million yearly. This problem can be greatly reduced by identifying the infected fields and replacing them with endophyte-free or novel endophyte tall fescue varieties or by managing them in a way to minimize the impact of the endophyte on herd productivity. One of the simplest ways to reduce toxicity symptoms in cattle is add red and white clover to existing tall fescue stands. | PPA-30
web only | 2 pages | 1,222 words | 22 downloads | PDF: 253 kb


Chemical Control of Turfgrass Diseases, 2017
4/4/2017 (major revision)

Turgrasses under intensive management are often subject to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Good turf management practices often greatly reduce the impact of disease by promoting healthy plants that are better able to resist infections. Even under good management, however, diseases sometimes cause excessive damage to highly managed turfgrasses. The proper use of fungicides in these instances, in conjunction with good cultural practices that promote quality turf, can be an important part of an overall disease-management program. | PPA-1
web only | 32 pages | 21,555 words | 110 downloads | PDF: 1,926 kb


Stewart's Wilt of Corn
1/1/2017 (new)

Historically, Stewart's wilt of corn has resulted in losses for corn producers. Although this disease still occurs occasionally, it has become less prevalent in recent years in Kentucky and surrounding states. Stewart's wilt has been known by other names, such as bacterial leaf blight, Stewart's leaf blight, and maize bacteriosis. | PPFS-AG-C-4
web only | 3 pages | 1,079 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 1,445 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Strawberry in Kentucky
11/17/2016 (new)

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed (although rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders helps identify potential problems before serious losses result. This is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur in Kentucky strawberry plantings. | ID-238
1,600 printed copies | 28 pages | 6,288 words | 28 downloads | PDF: 10,025 kb


Genetically Engineered Crops: A Review of Concerns and Benefits
10/1/2016 (new)

Genetically engineered crops are plants that have had their genetic material (DNA) purposefully manipulated in the laboratory to produce a particular beneficial outcome. These types of crops are often called genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Commercial genetically engineered crops are designed to have limited and precise genetic changes that provide one or more benefits to humans or the environment. | PPFS-MISC-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,238 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,260 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of High Tunnel and Greenhouse Vegetable Crops in Kentucky
7/8/2016 (new)

Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. The key to effective monitoring is accurate identification. The pictures included in this guide represent the more common abiotic and biotic problems that occur on vegetable crops grown in high tunnel and greenhouse structures in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter problems not included here. Please contact a local Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance. | ID-235
2,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 5,187 words | 43 downloads | PDF: 5,436 kb


Commercial Apple Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guide
7/1/2016 (minor revision)

A sample spray guide and spray schedule worksheet. | PPFS-FR-T-19
web only | 2 pages | 365 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 337 kb


Backyard Berry Disease and Disease Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard berry (blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, and strawberry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-25
web only | 4 pages | 1,260 words | 30 downloads | PDF: 1,037 kb


Backyard Grape Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard grape production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 1,263 words | 20 downloads | PDF: 1,213 kb


Backyard Stone Fruit Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard stone fruit (peach, nectarine, plum, and cherry) production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,234 words | 18 downloads | PDF: 890 kb


Backyard Apple Disease and Pest Management Using Cultural Practices (with Low Spray, No Spray and Organic Options)
6/1/2016 (new)

Backyard apple production requires a proactive approach to disease, insect, and weed management. Preventative practices are recommended to minimize inputs. While intensive culture may result in the highest quality fruit, reduced inputs can result in acceptable fruit with minor crop losses or aesthetic maladies. This guide focuses on preventative cultural practices with options of low-input pesticide applications. Refer to the homeowner fruit spray guide (ID-21) for a more complete pesticide spray schedule. | PPFS-FR-T-21
web only | 4 pages | 1,311 words | 27 downloads | PDF: 1,013 kb


Common Diseases of Spruce in Kentucky
6/1/2016 (new)

Spruce trees, particularly blue spruce (Picea pungens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies), are popular specimen trees and screening conifers in Kentucky landscapes. Unfortunately, they can present problems for homeowners as a result of poor vigor, dieback, or needle drop. A combination of infectious disease and environmental stress is often to blame. | PPFS-OR-W-24
web only | 5 pages | 1,627 words | 11 downloads | PDF: 2,118 kb


Simplified Backyard Grape Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A simplified backyard grape spray guide (table). | PPFS-FR-S-23
web only | 1 pages | 323 words | 17 downloads | PDF: 351 kb


Sample Fungicide Spray Schedule for Commercial Bramble
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A sample fungicide spray schedule for commercial bramble (table). | PPFS-FR-S-22
web only | 1 pages | 152 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 236 kb


Sample Fungicide Spray Schedule for Commercial Blueberry
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

A sample fungicide spray schedule for commercial blueberry growers (table). | PPFS-FR-S-21
web only | 1 pages | 197 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 280 kb


Commercial Grape Fungicide Schedule Worksheet and Sample Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (new)

A fungicide schedule worksheet and two sample spray guides for commercial grape growers. | PPFS-FR-S-20
web only | 3 pages | 599 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 427 kb


Simplified Backyard Peach and Stone Fruit Spray Guide
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Peach, nectarine, apricot, plum, and cherry are all stone fruits. Production of these tree fruits requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. Disease resistant cultivars are the preferred method for reducing spray inputs. | PPFS-FR-T-20
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 19 downloads | PDF: 672 kb


Simplified Backyard Apple Spray Guides
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Apple production requires pest and disease management programs for quality fruit. Home orchards are no different. Homeowners, however, are generally more tolerant of aesthetic maladies or minor crop losses than commercial orchardists. Thus, homeowners may choose to limit numbers of insecticide and fungicide sprays. | PPFS-FR-T-18
web only | 4 pages | 1,284 words | 23 downloads | PDF: 626 kb


Fungicides for Tree Fruits
4/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-92, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-11
web only | 3 pages | 894 words | 15 downloads | PDF: 124 kb


Relative Effectiveness of Various Chemicals for Disease Control of Ornamental Plants
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included here as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and mention or listing of commercial products does not imply endorsement nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current STATE regulations and conforms to the product label. Examine a current product label before applying any chemical. For assistance, contact your county Cooperative Extension agent. | PPFS-GEN-13
web only | 3 pages | 2,173 words | 9 downloads | PDF: 388 kb


Simplified Fungicide Guide for Backyard Fruit
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

This fungicide spray guide is intended as a supplement to the more detailed spray schedule available in Disease and Insect Control Programs for Homegrown Fruit in Kentucky, Including Organic Alternatives, ID-21. | PPFS-GEN-8
web only | 2 pages | 554 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 431 kb


Homeowner's Guide to Fungicides
4/1/2016 (minor revision)

Diseases in home gardens, orchards, and landscapes do not always cause total losses, but they can be serious problems if left unmanaged. As a rule, chemicals are not recommended as the only means of disease control for homeowners. Cultural practices such as sanitation, irrigation management, attention to plant health, rotation, and selection of disease-resistant varieties are usually enough to control diseases. Chemicals may be required, though, and should be used as a supplement to good management practices. | PPFS-GEN-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,312 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 491 kb


Fungicides for Management of Diseases in Commercial Greenhouse Ornamentals
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-GH-3
web only | 3 pages | 737 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 118 kb


Fungicides for Management of Landscape Woody Ornamental Diseases
4/1/2016 (reviewed)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-OR-W-14
web only | 3 pages | 734 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 118 kb


Plant Diseases: Kentucky Master Gardener Manual Chapter 6
3/2/2016 (major revision)

Anyone who has ever planted a garden knows not only the rewards of beautiful flowers, fruit, and/or vegetables, but also the disappointment when plants become diseased or damaged. Many factors cause plants to exhibit poor vigor, changes in appearance, or even death. This chapter focuses on those living organisms that cause disease: fungi, water molds, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, phytoplasmas, and parasitic plants. | PPA-46
web only | 24 pages | 5,749 words | 41 downloads | PDF: 5,000 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Grape Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-S-18
web only | 5 pages | 1,450 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 407 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Strawberry Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-S-15
web only | 3 pages | 885 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 398 kb


Commercial Peach/Stone Fruit Fungicide Spray Schedule Worksheet
3/1/2016 (new)

A spray schedule worksheet for commercial peach/stone fruit growers. | PPFS-FR-T-23
web only | 1 pages | 181 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 458 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Apple Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-15
web only | 3 pages | 576 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 385 kb


Effectiveness of Fungicides for Management of Stone Fruit Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

This guide is a decision-making tool to help growers select fungicides from different chemical classes (FRAC). Additional information can be found in a number of UK Cooperative Extension Service publications, including ID-232, or by contacting county Extension agents. | PPFS-FR-T-14
web only | 3 pages | 1,047 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 401 kb


Cherry Leaf Spot
3/1/2016 (new)

Cherry leaf spot occurs on both sweet and sour cherry; however, it is considerably more serious on sour cherries. Premature defoliation from cherry leaf spot reduces flower bud set for the next year, weakens trees, and increases sensitivity to winter injury. | PPFS-FR-T-6
web only | 1 pages | 311 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 500 kb


Considerations for Diagnosis of Ornamentals in the Landscape
3/1/2016 (new)

Diagnosing plant problems can be challenging. A site visit can provide the information necessary for a complete and accurate diagnosis. However, once on-site, it is important to know how to proceed. The following guidelines are intended to assist in the process of gathering pertinent information and determining a possible cause. Often abiotic conditions such as environment, mechanical damage, or living organisms like insects or wildlife may be to blame. Should the field site diagnosis be inconclusive and samples need to be submitted to the UK Plant Diagnostic Laboratories, the information gathered here can provide valuable supplementary information. | PPFS-GEN-15
web only | 6 pages | 1,109 words | 10 downloads | PDF: 3,377 kb


Managing Greenhouse and High Tunnel Environments to Reduce Plant Diseases
3/1/2016 (new)

Greenhouse and high tunnel environments, which tend to be warm and humid, often create ideal situations for disease development. Environments favoring infection and spread of many disease pathogens include one or more of the following: high relative humidity (90% or above), free moisture (e.g., leaf wetness, wet soil), and/or warm temperature. Because diseases can cause extensive damage, their management is essential to production of high quality, marketable products. While challenging, these environments can be managed to simultaneously encourage plant growth and discourage pathogen spread. | PPFS-GH-1
web only | 6 pages | 2,233 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 1,494 kb


Managing Spring Dead Spot of Bermudagrass
3/1/2016 (new)

Spring dead spot is the most destructive disease of bermudagrass in Kentucky. The most serious outbreaks occur under high maintenance conditions; e.g., high nitrogen fertility, low mowing height, and frequent traffic. Moderate to severe outbreaks can occur under low-maintenance conditions as well. | PPFS-OR-T-13
web only | 4 pages | 1,638 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 816 kb


Fungicide Guide for Burley and Dark Tobacco, 2016
2/24/2016 (minor revision)

The number of fungicides that are registered for use on tobacco in Kentucky is relatively small in comparison to the large array of products available to producers of other crops. Although growers have a limited number of fungicides from which to choose, those that are available are effective against most of the major diseases of roots, stems, and foliage. | PPFS-AG-T-8
web only | 6 pages | 1,980 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 295 kb


Frogeye Leaf Spot, Black Rot, and Canker of Apple
2/1/2016 (new)

Black rot and frogeye are common names of an apple disease that occurs in three phases: (1) leaf infections result in frogeye leaf spot, while (2) fruit rot and (3) branch infections are referred to as black rot. All three phases can cause significant damage in Kentucky home and commercial orchards. | PPFS-FR-T-3
web only | 3 pages | 785 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 1,003 kb


Don't Eat Those Wild Mushrooms
2/1/2016 (new)

Mushrooms are strange and wonderful things--some are beautiful, some are ugly, some are delicious, and some are deadly. Mushroom hunting is a fun and rewarding hobby that can turn a hike through local woods into a puzzle-solving adventure. Many people are drawn to mushroom hunting and the potential to forage for food. Unfortunately, there is a dark side to mushroom foraging: poisoning. Each year, wild mushrooms lead to numerous illnesses and even a few deaths. | PPFS-GEN-14
web only | 5 pages | 1,611 words | 21 downloads | PDF: 1,283 kb


Shade Tree Anthracnose
2/1/2016 (new)

Anthracnose is the common name given to several fungal shade tree diseases with similar dark, irregularly-shaped leaf lesions. While they are primarily foliar diseases, damage on some hosts may extend to twigs, branches, and buds. In established trees, anthracnose usually does not cause permanent damage. However, resulting defoliation and dieback, especially if it occurs year after year, can weaken trees and make them more susceptible to environmental stresses and secondary pathogens. | PPFS-OR-W-23
web only | 4 pages | 1,279 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 869 kb


Black Spot of Rose
2/1/2016 (reviewed)

Black spot is the most common and serious disease of roses in Kentucky. It is a problem in greenhouse production and outdoor plantings. | PPFS-OR-W-10
web only | 1 pages | 344 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 350 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Cole Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and brussel sprouts, all cole crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens. During wet seasons, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry seasons. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. | PPFS-VG-23
web only | 2 pages | 822 words | 7 downloads | PDF: 788 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Legume Vegetable Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Beans and peas, both legume crops, are excellent plants to integrate into gardens for multiple reasons. These plants are affected by few of the diseases that affect other popular garden plants. Beans and peas increase nitrogen fertility where they are planted, enriching the soil for the plants that are to follow them in a rotation. These plants can be extremely productive, and are a great source of dietary fiber and, in some cases, vegetable protein. | PPFS-VG-22
web only | 2 pages | 841 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 460 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Solanaceous Crops in the Home Garden
1/1/2016 (new)

Solanaceous crops, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and potatoes, may be the most popular garden plants, but many diseases commonly affect them. Early blight and Septoria leaf spot occur each year under even the best disease management, and bacterial spot may be spread easily under rainy conditions. A combination of approaches, such as using resistant varieties, record-keeping, cultural, and chemical management, is the best practice for minimizing vegetable garden diseases. | PPFS-VG-21
web only | 2 pages | 981 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 874 kb


Black Knot
12/1/2015 (new)

Black knot is a common, often serious, disease of plums and cherries in Kentucky. Ornamental Prunus species, as well as wild plums and cherries, may also be affected. Trees in both commercial and residential plantings are susceptible. | PPFS-FR-T-4
web only | 2 pages | 617 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 784 kb


Peach Leaf Curl and Plum Pockets
12/1/2015 (new)

Peach leaf curl occurs annually in commercial and residential orchards throughout Kentucky. The disease causes severe defoliation, weakens trees, and reduces fruit quality, fruit set, and yield. Peaches, apricots, and nectarines are susceptible to peach leaf curl. Plum pockets is a similar, but less common, disease that occurs on wild and cultivated plums. | PPFS-FR-T-1
web only | 3 pages | 667 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 887 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Leafy Green Crops in the Home Garden
12/1/2015 (new)

Leafy greens are great garden plants as a result of their short seasons, ease of growing, and ability to be succession planted. In wet summers, bacterial diseases, fungal leaf spots, and downy mildew are common problems, while powdery mildew is more common during dry summers. Bacterial diseases are also benefited by hot weather with occasional strong storms, which injure plants and spread pathogens in the garden. Lettuce drop, caused by the Sclerotinia fungus, can become a multi-year problem and may spread to different families of plants. | PPFS-VG-20
web only | 2 pages | 781 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 896 kb


Sustainable Disease Management of Cucurbit Crops in the Home Garden
12/1/2015 (new)

Cucurbit vining crops include cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, zucchini, and summer and winter squashes, and can be highly productive plants in small gardens. During wet summers, downy mildew and fungal leaf spot diseases tend to occur, while in drier summers, powdery mildew is the most common disease. Gardens with cucumber beetle pressure are much more likely to have plants affected by bacterial wilt, since striped and spotted cucumber beetles can carry the bacterial wilt pathogen. | PPFS-VG-19
web only | 2 pages | 854 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 995 kb


Gummosis and Perennial Canker of Stone Fruits
11/1/2015 (minor revision)

Gummosis is a general, nonspecific condition of stone fruits (peach, nectarine, plum and cherry) in which gum is exuded and deposited on the bark of trees. Gum is produced in response to any type of wound, regardless of whether it is due to insects, mechanical injury or disease. | PPFS-FR-T-8
web only | 2 pages | 559 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 207 kb


"Wet Feet" of Ornamentals
11/1/2015 (new)

"Wet feet" is the common term for a condition that affects plant species intolerant of wet growing conditions. This problem occurs when soils become saturated with water, which, in turn, displaces available oxygen. Roots require oxygen to function; when oxygen is deficient, roots suffocate. Once root damage occurs, plants decline and may eventually die. While "wet feet" is an abiotic disorder and is not caused by infectious organisms, declining root health and wet soil conditions can inhibit the ability of some plants to thrive. This also provides ideal conditions for many root and collar rot water mold pathogens, such as Phytophthora and Pythium. | PPFS-OR-W-4
web only | 4 pages | 1,199 words | 8 downloads | PDF: 1,362 kb


Tree Wounds: Invitations to Wood Decay Fungi
9/1/2015 (new)

Wood decay leads to loss of tree vigor and vitality, resulting in decline, dieback, and structural failure. Wounds play an important part in this process since they are the primary point of entry for wood decay pathogens. While other factors may also result in decline and dieback, the presence of wounds and/or outward signs of pathogens provides confirmation that wood decay is an underlying problem. Wounds and wood decay reduce the ability of trees to support themselves. | PPFS-OR-W-1
web only | 7 pages | 1,947 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 2,953 kb


Apple Rust Diseases
8/1/2015 (new)

Cedar-apple rust is the most common and economically important rust disease occurring on apple in Kentucky. Two other rusts, cedar-hawthorn rust and cedar-quince rust, are of lesser importance on apple, but can significantly impact ornamental plants. All three diseases occur on crabapple, hawthorn, mountain ash, pear, and serviceberry. | PPFS-FR-T-5
web only | 5 pages | 1,395 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 813 kb


Guia de Monitoreo de MIP para Plagas Comunes de los Cultivos Cucurbitaceos en Kentucky
7/15/2015 (new)

Esta guia cubre los problemas abioticos y bioticos mas comunes que ocurren en cucurbitaceas (Familia Curcubitaceae) en Kentucky. Este grupo de plantas, al que tambien se refiere como enredaderas trepadoras, incluye al pepino, melon (cantalope), sandia, melones especiales, calabazas (o zapallos), calabacines, y cogordas (conocidas tambien como calabazas de peregrino, ayotes, jicaras, o porongos [gourds en ingles]). | ID-91s
2,500 printed copies | 24 pages | 8,426 words | 25 downloads | PDF: 1,743 kb


Maintaining the Efficacy of Foliar Fungicides for Tobacco Disease Management
7/1/2015 (new)

Management of resistance to fungicides is based on alternating the use of particular modes of action, or FRAC groups, which essentially presents multiple different challenges to the fungal population. Overall, fungi that are naturally resistant to a mode of action are very rare in the environment. Challenging a population with multiple different modes of action will reduce the chance of developing widespread resistance, which will prolong the efficacy of these chemicals. | PPFS-AG-T-5
web only | 4 pages | 1,356 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 473 kb


Blueberry Root Rot
5/1/2015 (new)

Blueberry is considered one of the most disease-free fruit crops in Kentucky. Many of the diseases that affect blueberry result in minor damage. However, the most common disease of blueberry, Phytophthora root rot, can cause severe dieback and often results in plant death. The causal agent of blueberry root rot is Phytophthora cinnamomi, a soilborne water mold that occurs world-wide and can infect a wide range of hosts, including woody ornamentals. Under optimal conditions, the pathogen proliferates, and disease symptoms occur. | PPFS-FR-S-19
web only | 3 pages | 993 words | 1 download | PDF: 702 kb


Garden Mum Production: Diseases and Nutritional Disorders
5/1/2015 (new)

Many Kentucky vegetable and greenhouse producers are beginning to include fall chrysanthemum production in their operations. Garden mums are usually planted in June and sold in September when fall color is in demand. Production can vary in size; small scale growers may produce as few as 200 plants per season. Size of the operation influences cultural practices, as well as initial investments in important practices (e.g., surface drainage, pre-plant fungicide dips, and pre-emergent herbicides); all of which can impact disease management. | PPFS-OR-H-10
web only | 7 pages | 461 words | - | PDF: 1,803 kb


When White Pines Turn Brown: Common Problems of White Pines in Kentucky
4/1/2015 (new)

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is a popular conifer in many Kentucky landscapes, although its use may be limited to loose, well-drained, pathogen-free soil. Often, needle browning is the primary symptom that alerts homeowners and nursery growers of health problems. In Kentucky, brown needles on white pine are often caused by one of the following three conditions: white pine decline, white pine root decline (Procerum root rot), or Phytophthora root rot. | PPFS-OR-W-22
web only | 4 pages | 1,497 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,170 kb


Fundamental Principles of Plant Pathology for Agricultural Producers
3/9/2015 (major revision)

All crop plants produced in Kentucky have the potential to become diseased under certain conditions. Diseases of crops can affect yield and/or quality of the harvested commodity, which can impact profitability and increase the risks of farming. A plant is diseased when it is affected by some agent that interferes with its normal development. Some disorders are caused by noninfectious factors, such as temperature extremes or nutrient deficiencies. However, this publication focuses on diseases caused by infectious microorganisms. | PPA-41
web only | 7 pages | 3,473 words | 45 downloads | PDF: 3,800 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Legume Vegetables in Kentucky
1/30/2015 (new)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" (but rarely eliminated entirely) to reduce their negative impact on the crop. Scouting and monitoring diseases, insects, weeds, and abiotic disorders in order to identify potential problems before they result in serious losses is essential to the IPM approach. Proper identification is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during bean and pea production in Kentucky. This manual is not all-inclusive, and growers may encounter a problem that is not included here. Please contact your county Extension service for assistance. | ID-227
1,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 6,479 words | 40 downloads | PDF: 33,000 kb


Diplodia Tip Blight of Pine
1/1/2015 (new)

Tip blight is a serious disease of landscape pines in Kentucky. Pines such as Austrian (Pinus nigra), Scots (P. sylvestris), and Mugo (P. mugo) are most commonly affected. Other landscape conifers occasionally may be affected by tip blight as well. Tip blight disease has not been found on eastern white pine (P. strobus). | PPFS-OR-W-21
web only | 3 pages | 922 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,268 kb


Managing Diseases of Alfalfa
12/1/2014 (new)

Alfalfa can be a vigorous and productive forage crop for Kentucky farmers. Like all farm crops, however, alfalfa is subject to infectious diseases that can limit forage production. Managing these diseases is an important part of economical alfalfa production. | PPFS-AG-F-9
web only | 4 pages | 1,658 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 756 kb


Brown Patch Disease in Kentucky Lawns
12/1/2014 (new)

Brown patch, also called Rhizoctonia blight, is a common infectious disease of turfgrass. All turfgrasses grown in Kentucky lawns can be affected by brown patch. However, this disease is usually destructive only in tall fescue and perennial ryegrass during warm, humid weather. While brown patch can temporarily harm a lawn's appearance, it usually does not cause permanent loss of turf except in plantings less than 1 year old. | PPFS-OR-T-12
web only | 4 pages | 1,767 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 745 kb


Soybean Cyst Nematode Management Recommendations for Kentucky, 2015
11/1/2014 (reviewed)

SCN-resistant soybean varieties are an essential tool in the management of SCN. Although some of the early resistant varieties lagged behind susceptible varieties in yield, newer resistant varieties adapted for use in Kentucky do not suffer the same yield penalty. In fact, in the absence of SCN, it is common for modern SCN-resistant varieties to out-yield the best susceptible varieties in university research trials. | PPFS-AG-S-24
web only | 4 pages | 875 words | 1 download | PDF: 546 kb


Disease Management in the Home Lawn
11/1/2014 (new)

This publication describes lawn management practices that can help control diseases of turfgrasses commonly used in home lawns--Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and perennial ryegrass. You can control diseases of turfgrasses most effectively by using as many of the following lawn management practices as feasible. | PPFS-OR-T-11
web only | 4 pages | 1,670 words | 4 downloads | PDF: 1,018 kb


Patch Diseases in Kentucky Bluegrass Lawns
11/1/2014 (new)

"Patch diseases" can be very destructive when Kentucky bluegrass is grown under intensive management. Two patch diseases with similar symptoms can occur. Necrotic ring spot often appears in early summer. Summer patch, the more common disease in Kentucky landscapes, develops in middle to late summer. | PPFS-OR-T-6
web only | 4 pages | 1,892 words | 1 download | PDF: 793 kb


Boxwood Blight
11/1/2014 (new)

Boxwood blight is a disease of boxwood (Buxus spp.), causing rapid defoliation and plant dieback. The fungal disease is particularly devastating to American boxwood cultivars, which can defoliate within a week and die within one growing season. Plants are eventually weakened by repeated defoliation and dieback, and resulting plant stress and consequent colonization by secondary invaders result in plant death. | PPFS-OR-W-20
web only | 3 pages | 973 words | 1 download | PDF: 730 kb


Kentucky Plant Disease Management Guide for Forage Legumes
10/1/2014 (new)

Disease management in forage legumes relies heavily on using disease-resistant varieties and employing sound agronomic practices. It is important to integrate both of these strategies into a comprehensive disease management program. Failure to consider one or the other will compromise the success of your efforts. The appropriate use of pesticides sometimes plays a significant role in managing certain diseases, but it is secondary to sound cultural practices and proper variety selection. | PPFS-AG-F-8
web only | 7 pages | 2,707 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 907 kb


Blackleg and Bacterial Soft Rot of Potato
10/1/2014 (new)

Blackleg and soft rot are bacterial diseases that cause heavy losses in Kentucky potato patches in some years. These diseases may result in missing hills when seed pieces are destroyed or the sprouts decay before they emerge from the ground. Serious rotting of tubers in potato hills and in storage can also occur. | PPFS-VG-18
web only | 2 pages | 754 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 707 kb


Winter Decline Syndrome of Canola
9/1/2014 (new)

Interest in producing canola in Kentucky has greatly increased in recent years. Many farming operations wish to diversify their production systems with different row crops that require little to no additional equipment or infrastructure costs; canola is such a crop. Additionally, newer canola cultivars have improved agronomic traits, including winter hardiness. Lastly, more stable markets in Kentucky have greatly increased the profitability of canola. | PPFS-AG-R-1
web only | 2 pages | 697 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 600 kb


Bacterial Spot of Pepper and Tomato
9/1/2014 (new)

Bacterial spot can result in severe damage to tomato, sweet pepper, and pimento crops. The bacterium attacks leaves, fruits, and stems causing blemishes on these plant parts. Outbreaks of leaf spotting have resulted in leaf drop and poor fruit set in the field. Defoliation due to leaf spotting can increase the incidence of sun scald on fruit. Fruit infections result in badly spotted fruit, which are of little market value. In addition, fruit injury from this disease allows entry of secondary fruit rotting organisms, causing further damage. | PPFS-VG-17
web only | 3 pages | 786 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 636 kb


Bean Diseases
8/1/2014 (new)

Anthracnose can reduce bean quality, as well as yield. Losses can be severe during cool, rainy weather. It is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which appears on all aboveground parts of the plant but rarely on roots. Lesions generally are dark brown and may contain pink spore masses during moist weather. Elongate, angular spots appear on lower leaf veins. As the fungus spreads into surrounding tissue, lesions eventually appear on the upper side of veins. Affected seeds become discolored. Plants grown from infected seed may develop lesions on the cotyledons. | PPFS-VG-16
web only | 6 pages | 2,129 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,154 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Sweet Corn in Kentucky
6/3/2014 (reprinted)

In terms of acreage, sweet corn is the largest commercial vegetable crop grown in Kentucky. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs have played an important role in its production and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed" but not necessarily eliminated in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-184
4,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 5,437 words | 22 downloads | PDF: 1,054 kb


Twig Blights of Juniper
6/1/2014 (new)

Twig and branch dieback is a common sight in many juniper plantings in Kentucky. While other factors can cause these general symptoms, two fungal diseases are frequently responsible for the dieback. | PPFS-OR-W-11
web only | 2 pages | 720 words | 1 download | PDF: 600 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Apple in Kentucky
5/7/2014 (new)

The National Integrated Pest Management Network defines IPM as "a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks." One of the key components of IPM is to continually scout and monitor crops to identify problems before they result in significant economic losses. Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter during apple production in Kentucky. | ID-219
3,000 printed copies | 20 pages | 5,056 words | 42 downloads | PDF: 2,600 kb


Root-knot Nematode in Commercial and Residential Crops
5/1/2014 (new)

Root-knot nematode (RKN) is a soil-dwelling microscopic roundworm. This nematode is parasitic on numerous plants, including vegetables, fruits, field crops, ornamentals, and common weeds. RKN can occur in commercial and homeowner plantings. Frequently, the nematode interacts with other plant pathogens to form a disease complex in which the resulting disease is much more severe than that caused by either component alone. Root-knot nematode is particularly serious when high populations are allowed to build up due to continuous replanting of susceptible plants on the same site. | PPFS-GEN-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,619 words | 1 download | PDF: 917 kb


Transplant Shock: Disease or Cultural Problem?
5/1/2014 (new)

When trees and shrubs are moved from one growing site to another (e.g. from nursery to landscape), they endure stress. If care is taken to minimize stress through proper transplanting techniques and maintenance, plants are likely to recover rapidly and become well-established in their new sites. Unfortunately, the opposite usually occurs. | PPFS-OR-W-19
web only | 10 pages | 706 words | 6 downloads | PDF: 2,476 kb


Tomato Wilt Problems
5/1/2014 (new)

Fusarium and Verticillium wilts are two fungal diseases that cause similar wilts in tomato. Fusarium wilt tends to be more common during warm weather, while Verticillium wilt is found more often when temperatures are cool. Both diseases share similar symptoms and can be hard to tell apart visually; laboratory tests are often needed for an accurate diagnosis. | PPFS-VG-15
web only | 4 pages | 1,510 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 2,070 kb


Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits
4/1/2014 (new)

Bacterial wilt is a common, often destructive, disease of cucurbits. This disease can cause nearly complete losses of a planting before the first harvest. Bacterial wilt primarily affects cucumber and muskmelon (cantaloupe). While squash and pumpkin are also susceptible, the damage to these hosts is usually less severe. | PPFS-VG-11
web only | 3 pages | 1,044 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 575 kb


Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits Quick Facts
4/1/2014 (new)

Highlights from the publication Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits, PPFS-VG-11. | PPFS-VG-11-QF
web only | 2 pages | 300 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 786 kb


Diagnosis of "No Disease"
3/1/2014 (new)

Extension Agents and growers may occasionally receive diagnostic reports from the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory that indicate "no disease was found." One or both of the following explanations may account for the diagnosis of "No Disease." | PPFS-GEN-11
web only | 3 pages | 916 words | 1 download | PDF: 867 kb


Submitting Plant Specimens for Disease Diagnosis
3/1/2014 (new)

Diagnosis of plant diseases is one of the many ways that the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and UK Cooperative Extension serve the citizens of Kentucky. This publication is designed to help growers collect and submit the best plant samples for an accurate diagnosis. | PPFS-GEN-9
web only | 7 pages | 872 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 2,312 kb


Sampling Soybean Fields for Soybean Cyst Nematode Analysis
1/1/2014 (minor revision)

The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) causes many millions of dollars worth of damage to Kentucky soybean fields each year. This occurs even though damage is mostly preventable and controls are inexpensive. This situation exists because a large number of soybean producers are unaware that cyst nematode is damaging their crops. In most cases soybean cyst nematode will cause significant yield reductions without producing any detectable symptoms in soybeans. When symptoms do occur, they are frequently thought to be associated with some other factor, such as soil compaction or low soil fertility. | PPFS-AG-S-9
web only | 3 pages | 1,169 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 679 kb


Some Principles of Fungicide Resistance
1/1/2014 (new)

Fungicides are important tools in modern crop production. Unfortunately, one of the risks of using these products is that fungi sometimes develop resistance to them. Resistance development is a concern because the products may become less effective--or even useless--for controlling resistant pathogens and pests. This is a concern for all pesticides, including fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides. This fact sheet is intended to help pesticide applicators better understand this process. | PPFS-MISC-2
web only | 10 pages | 5,690 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 1,325 kb


Fruit, Orchard, and Vineyard Sanitation
8/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home fruit plantings, resulting in premature leaf drop, fruit decay, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-5
web only | 3 pages | 919 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 723 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cole Crops in Kentucky
7/22/2013 (new)

Cole crops are important as a group, particularly when all acreage of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts are combined. Spring planted crops may have very different problems associated with them compared to fall crops. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs fill an important role in production of these crops and have enabled growers to improve quality and minimize input costs. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are employed in such a way as to minimize environmental risks, economic costs, and health hazards. Pests are "managed," but not necessarily eliminated, in order to reduce their negative impact on the crop. | ID-216
3,000 printed copies | 16 pages | 4,491 words | 39 downloads | PDF: 5,300 kb


Rating Scale for Brown Stripe of Orchardgrass
7/1/2013 (new)

As of right now, there is little published on how to assess foliar disease severity in forage grasses in order to determine the percentage which may be diseased. This publication provides a tool for visually determining the percentage of diseased foliar tissue in orchardgrass. It is based on the observation of individual leaves; however, it is hoped that eventually a rating system will be devised that provides disease percentages for entire plots. | PPFS-AG-F-7
web only | 3 pages | 511 words | - | PDF: 566 kb


Landscape Sanitation
7/1/2013 (new)

Diseases can become a significant problem in commercial and home landscape plantings (Figure 1a), resulting in premature leaf drop, dieback, decline, and even plant death. When diseases do occur, it is often presumed that fungicides are the most important and effective disease management tools available. However, a good sanitation program can help reduce the need for chemical controls and can improve the effectiveness of other practices for managing disease. This often-overlooked disease management tool reduces pathogen numbers and eliminates infective propagules that cause disease. | PPFS-GEN-4
web only | 3 pages | 951 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 644 kb


Leaf Scorch and Winter Drying of Woody Plants
6/1/2013 (new)

Leaf scorch symptoms can develop whenever water needed for growth and health of plant foliage is insufficient. While symptoms are often due to unfavorable environmental conditions, leaf scorch can also result from an infectious disease. Symptoms, possible causes, and management of leaf scorch are discussed below. | PPFS-OR-W-17
web only | 4 pages | 1,587 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 681 kb


Soybean Foliar Spots and Blights
5/1/2013 (minor revision)

Soybean foliage is susceptible to a number of fungal and bacterial pathogens. These pathogens cause leaf spots and blights and are generally common in Kentucky; however, few fields in any given year are seriously damaged by foliar diseases. Crop rotation and weather that is unfavorable to disease typically keeps foliar diseases at low levels. Occasionally an extended period of wet and humid weather in July to early August will result in significant amounts of foliar disease and yields may be seriously affected. However, this scenario is relatively uncommon in Kentucky. | PPFS-AG-S-19
web only | 6 pages | 2,197 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 856 kb


Greenhouse Sanitation
3/1/2013 (new)

Diseases are a major concern for greenhouse growers and can be a key limitation to profitable plant production. Disease management in greenhouses is critical because the warm, humid environment in these structures provides optimal conditions for reproduction of many pathogens. When disease management is neglected, pathogen populations build-up and continue to increase as long as there is susceptible plant tissue available for infection and disease development. Infected plant tissue, infested soil, and pathogen inoculum (such as spores, bacterial cells, virus particles, nematode eggs) all serve as sources of pathogens that can later infect healthy plants. | PPFS-GH-4
web only | 3 pages | 942 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 640 kb


Verticillium Wilt of Woody Plants
3/1/2013 (new)

Verticillium wilt can affect a wide range of ornamental trees and shrubs, as well as a number of tree fruits and woody small fruits. Over 400 herbaceous and woody plant species have been reported as hosts for this disease. | PPFS-OR-W-18
web only | 3 pages | 806 words | 1 download | PDF: 534 kb


Black Rot of Grape
10/1/2012 (new)

Black rot is the most prevalent and one of the most important grape diseases in Kentucky. While this disease can affect all young developing plant tissues above ground, fruit infections are the most destructive. Without an adequate disease management program, both home and commercial vineyards suffer significant yield losses. | PPFS-FR-S-16
web only | 4 pages | 1,272 words | - | PDF: 555 kb


Downy Mildew of Soybean
9/1/2012 (minor revision)

Small, irregular spots on upper leaf surfaces are initially pale yellow in appearance, later becoming gray-brown with a yellowish margin. On the underside of the leaves, the spots have a gray, fuzzy appearance due to the presence of the pathogen. These fungal-like tufts are reproductive structures of the organism and their appearance is diagnostic for this disease. Symptoms frequently occur at low levels throughout the crop canopy. Early leaf spots are non-descript and are commonly confused with leaf spots and pustules caused by soybean rust. | PPFS-AG-S-3
web only | 2 pages | 512 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 538 kb


Apple Scab
8/1/2012 (new)

Apple scab is the most consistently serious disease of apple and flowering crabapple in Kentucky. This disease also occurs on hawthorn and mountain ash; a similar disease affects pear and pyracantha (firethorn). The most noticeable losses on apple result from reduced fruit quality and from premature drop of infected fruit. Scab also causes a general weakening of the host when leaves are shed prematurely. Summer defoliation of flowering crabapple due to scab invariably results in fewer flowers the next spring. | PPFS-FR-T-13
web only | 3 pages | 1,045 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 486 kb


Fire Blight
8/1/2012 (minor revision)

Fire blight is a highly destructive disease of apple and pear that can occur in commercial orchards and home plantings. Many landscape trees and shrubs in the rose family are also susceptible to this disease. Fire blight can cause severe damage in a very short period of time. Because precise conditions are needed for infection, disease appearance is erratic from year to year. | PPFS-FR-T-12
web only | 4 pages | 1,556 words | 5 downloads | PDF: 650 kb


Phytophthora Root and Stem Rot of Soybean
7/1/2012 (minor revision)

Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRSR), caused by Phythophthora sojae, is infrequently encountered in Kentucky. However, where it does occur, the disease can be quite destructive. Soon after planting, P. sojae can cause damping-off of germinating seeds and/or young seedlings. Severe stand loss often necessitates replanting. Alternately, this pathogen can infect and kill established plants of susceptible soybean varieties any time during the season. Varieties that have some resistance to P. sojae may be stunted, but rarely die. PRSR is primarily a problem in poorly drained fields (due to high clay content, "hard pan," and/or soil compaction) or areas of fields that are prone to flooding. | PPFS-AG-S-4
web only | 3 pages | 446 words | 1 download | PDF: 355 kb


Brown Spot of Soybean
6/1/2012 (minor revision)

Brown spot, caused by the fungus Septoria glycines, is present in all soybean fields in Kentucky. In most years the disease causes little to no yield impact; however, up to 15% yield losses can occur in select environments. For example, brown sport tends to be worse where soybeans follow no-till soybeans, where early-maturing varieties are planted, and/or when fields are planted in late April. River bottom fields or fields subject to fog or morning shade are frequently impacted. | PPFS-AG-S-1
web only | 2 pages | 666 words | 1 download | PDF: 420 kb


Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) in Kentucky
6/1/2012 (minor revision)

Wheat streak mosaic (WSM) is a potentially devastating virus disease of wheat. In the United States, WSM is most prevalent in hard red wheat grown in the central Great Plains region. Soft red winter wheat produced in the mid-south and Midwest is infrequently impacted by WSM. Epidemics are rare in Kentucky with the only recorded ones occurring in 1989 and 2000. | PPFS-AG-SG-8
web only | 4 pages | 1,453 words | 1 download | PDF: 282 kb


Rose Rosette Disease
5/1/2012 (new)

Rose rosette is a devastating disease that is a threat to virtually all cultivated roses (Rosa spp.) in Kentucky, regardless of cultivar. Even rose cultivars known for their exceptional disease resistance and hardiness are susceptible to rose rosette disease. Losses can occur in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and botanical garden plantings. | PPFS-OR-W-16
web only | 3 pages | 962 words | 1 download | PDF: 383 kb


Black Root Rot of Ornamentals
5/1/2012 (minor revision)

Black root rot can affect a wide range of ornamentals in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and greenhouses. In Kentucky, this disease is commonly observed on Japanese and blue hollies, inkberry, pansy, petunia, and vinca. In addition to ornamentals, numerous vegetable and agronomic crops are susceptible. | PPFS-OR-W-3
web only | 3 pages | 873 words | 1 download | PDF: 585 kb


Strawberry Anthracnose
2/1/2012 (minor revision)

Anthracnose can be a serious problem in Southern and Midwestern strawberry plantings. The disease may appear as a fruit or crown rot, both of which severely reduce plant stands and yields. Fruit rot, the most common form of anthracnose, appears as fruit begins to ripen in late spring. Crown rots, on the other hand, can develop in young plants soon after planting or when weather warms in spring. | PPFS-FR-S-5
web only | 3 pages | 815 words | 1 download | PDF: 293 kb


Damping-off of Vegetables and Herbaceous Ornamentals
2/1/2012 (new)

Damping-off can occur on any herbaceous crop grown from seed, including vegetables, ornamentals, and field crops. Seeds, seedlings, and young plants may be affected, resulting in poor stands in home gardens, greenhouses, and commercial fields. Losses to damping-off can be severe, especially when cool, wet weather prevails at seeding or seed emergence. | PPFS-GEN-3
web only | 2 pages | 622 words | 1 download | PDF: 288 kb


Sample Submission Protocol for Diagnosis of Thousand Cankers Disease in Walnut
2/1/2012 (new)

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a fatal disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra), and most recently, butternut (Juglans cinerea). The disease complex involves a fungus that is carried to trees by the walnut twig beetle, causing numerous cankers on branches and killing trees 5 to 6 years after infection. The disease complex is widespread in the western U.S., and has recently been identified in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. | PPFS-OR-W-15
web only | 2 pages | 557 words | 1 download | PDF: 361 kb


Assessing Foliar Diseases of Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat: Principles and Practices
11/1/2011 (new)

This publication provides basic information on how to conduct disease assessments in on-farm trials. The focus is on foliar diseases, since root diseases are much more difficult to assess properly. The publication begins with fundamentals of proper design of field trials. | PPFS-MISC-6
web only | 5 pages | 1,693 words | 1 download | PDF: 719 kb


Foliar Fungicide Use in Corn and Soybeans
10/1/2011 (new)

Interest in the use of foliar fungicides for corn and soybean has expanded dramatically in the U.S. over the past few years, resulting in a major change in how these crops are being produced on many farms. Until recently, foliar fungicides for soybeans and corn were reserved for seed production fields to protect seed quality in very specific circumstances or for specialty crops. Applications for the purpose of protecting crop yield were rarely economical. However, the current trend in Kentucky, as well as many other corn/soybean producing states, is towards an increased use of foliar fungicides on these crops as a means of maximizing yields. | PPFS-GEN-12
web only | 9 pages | 3,829 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 1,093 kb


Black "Sooty" Head Mold of Wheat
9/1/2011 (minor revision)

Each year, just prior to and during wheat harvest, the Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratories at Princeton and Lexington receive many samples with questions about severe head molding. This condition is known as black head mold or sooty head mold. | PPFS-AG-SG-7
web only | 2 pages | 405 words | 1 download | PDF: 264 kb


Fungicide Use in Wheat
9/1/2011 (minor revision)

Disease management is a key component of high-yielding wheat production. In most years, it simply is not possible to produce high wheat yields without paying attention to disease control. Most diseases are best managed through the use of multiple tactics, both proactive (e.g., crop rotation, delayed and/or staggered planting plates, use of resistant varieties of varying maturities, proper fertility, and application of seed treatment and/or foliar fungicides) and reactive (e.g., application of foliar fungicides and timely harvest). Fungicides are just one tool in the disease management arsenal; however, growers often place too much emphasis on this one tool. | PPFS-AG-SG-5
web only | 8 pages | 3,557 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 459 kb


Yellow Vine Decline of Cucurbits
8/1/2011 (new)

Symptoms of yellow vine decline begin to appear approximately 2 weeks before fruit maturity. The disease may appear initially as stunting of plants and/or intense yellowing of foliage, followed by a slow decline in plant health. In some cases, a sudden collapse of vines may occur with no other symptoms. Vascular tissue (phloem) from crowns of affected plants is often discolored, appearing light brown rather than a healthy translucent green. | PPFS-VG-12
web only | 3 pages | 824 words | 1 download | PDF: 454 kb


Blackleg of Tobacco
6/1/2011 (new)

Blackleg becomes a concern whenever Kentucky experiences extended periods of warm, wet, overcast weather in the spring. This disease, also referred to as bacterial soft rot, is one of the most serious problems likely to be encountered on tobacco seedlings. Blackleg has the potential for destroying large numbers of plants in a relatively short period of time. As with other diseases in the float system, proper management goes a long way in preventing problems with blackleg. | PPFS-AG-T-4
web only | 2 pages | 707 words | 1 download | PDF: 428 kb


Collar Rot in the Tobacco Float System
5/1/2011 (new)

Collar rot can be found in tobacco float beds each year in Kentucky; it causes a great deal of concern when it makes its appearance. Severe losses to this disease are rare, but they can occur if care is not taken to minimize the risk of disease development and prevent further spread after it does appear. | PPFS-AG-T-3
web only | 3 pages | 997 words | 1 download | PDF: 472 kb


Managing Target Spot and Rhizoctonia Damping-Off in the Float System
5/1/2011 (new)

Damping-off and target spot occur each year in Kentucky. They can cause significant levels of damage to tobacco seedlings if cloudy, rainy conditions prevail. Once considered minor problems in float beds, both diseases have increased steadily in importance in recent years. Sound management practices and early recognition of these diseases are keys to preventing serious losses during the transplant production cycle. | PPFS-AG-T-2
web only | 4 pages | 1,344 words | 1 download | PDF: 457 kb


Pythium Root Rot in Tobacco Float Systems
5/1/2011 (new)

Pythium root rot is the most common disease found in tobacco float beds in Kentucky; it can cause severe losses or delays in transplanting. Damage caused by this disease can be minimized through a combination of sound management practices and timely application of fungicide. | PPFS-AG-T-1
web only | 3 pages | 673 words | 1 download | PDF: 883 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Pests of Solanaceous Crops in Kentucky
4/29/2011 (minor revision)

Proper identification of pathogens and insect pests as well as nutritional and physiologic disorders and even herbicide drift is essential to determining the proper course of action. The pictures included in this guide represent some common pests or problems that growers may encounter when producing solanaceous crops (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and potatoes) in Kentucky. | ID-172
3,500 printed copies | 32 pages | 7,500 words | 36 downloads | PDF: 2,000 kb


Seed Treatment Fungicides for Soybeans: Issues to Consider
4/1/2011 (minor revision)

Kentucky soybean producers frequently ask the question "Is it advisable to treat soybean seed with fungicides?" There is no pat answer to this question because of the many variables involved. Historically, soybean has not been treated to the same extent that corn and wheat have in the U.S. There are many good reasons for this, and some of them are discussed below. However, the trend is toward greater use of fungicide seed treatment on soybean, both in Kentucky and nationally. | PPFS-AG-S-12
web only | 3 pages | 974 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 400 kb


The Importance of Scouting Wheat for Plant Diseases
4/1/2011 (new)

For a variety of reasons, few Kentucky wheat producers place much emphasis on scouting their wheat diseases. Time and labor constraints (for do-it-yourselfers), the cost of hiring a crop consultant, and indifference to the need for scouting rank among the top reasons why this is the case. However, scouting is essential for those interested in managing diseases using an integrated approach. | PPFS-AG-SG-12
web only | 2 pages | 519 words | - | PDF: 195 kb


Preplant Decisions Greatly Impact Disease Potential in Wheat
4/1/2011 (minor revision)

Kentucky wheat producers have a majority of their disease management program in place once the seed is in the ground. By that time, decisions have been made regarding the length of time since the last wheat crop, tillage method and seedbed preparation, variety selection, seed quality, seed treatment, planting date, seeding rate, seeding method, and fall fertility. Individually and collectively, these decisions play an important role in determining which diseases might develop, their severity, and their potential impact on crop yield, test weight, and grain quality. Because pre-plant and planting decisions are so important in the management of wheat diseases, you need to understand how they influence disease development. | PPFS-AG-SG-6
web only | 4 pages | 1,569 words | 1 download | PDF: 413 kb


Recognizing Late Blight on Tomato Seedlings
4/1/2011 (new)

Tomato seedlings that have late blight when transplanted can serve as sources of inoculum (spores) that can spread to nearby gardens and commercial plantings, so every measure should be taken to prevent these plants from making it to the field. The added threat is that sources of disease are introduced early in the tomato production season, magnifying the potential for heavy losses in seasons that favor late blight. | PPFS-VG-14
web only | 4 pages | 1,334 words | 1 download | PDF: 436 kb


Late Blight of Tomato
4/1/2011 (new)

Late blight is an extremely important and damaging disease of tomatoes and potatoes, and can be found nearly anywhere these crops are produced. Total crop failures are common with this disease. In the United States, significant losses occur each year--mainly in northeastern and north-central states. However, serious outbreaks have been reported in the southeastern U.S. as well. | PPFS-VG-13
web only | 4 pages | 1,416 words | 1 download | PDF: 565 kb


Gummy Stem Blight and Black Rot of Cucurbits
4/1/2011 (new)

Gummy stem blight is an important disease of cucurbits in many parts of Kentucky. Under conditions favorable to disease development, commercial growers and home gardeners may experience heavy losses. This disease can occur at any point in plant growth, from seedling stage to fruit in storage. Gummy stem blight is the name given to the disease when leaves and stems are infected. Muskmelon (cantaloupe), cucumber, and watermelon are most commonly affected by this phase of the disease. Black rot refers to the same disease on fruit; it is seen less often than the foliar phase. | PPFS-VG-8
web only | 3 pages | 820 words | 1 download | PDF: 584 kb


Phytophthora Blight of Cucurbits and Peppers
3/1/2011 (new)

Under ideal conditions, Phytophthora blight is an aggressive, fast moving disease that can cause extensive losses. This disease has become increasingly problematic on cucurbits and solanaceous crops in the United States. During the past decade, Phytophthora blight has been causing significant losses in several major vegetable production areas of the U.S. In Kentucky, serious outbreaks have been reported on summer squash, winter squash, cucumbers, watermelons, and peppers. | PPFS-VG-4
web only | 5 pages | 1,271 words | 1 download | PDF: 544 kb


Wheat Spindle Streak Mosaic Virus (WSSMV)
2/1/2011 (minor revision)

Wheat spindle streak mosaic (WSSM), also known as wheat yellow mosaic, is a common virus disease that affects only wheat. In most years, WSSM has little to no impact on crops grown in Kentucky. However, significant yield damage can occur in highly susceptible varieties when conditions favor infection and subsequent disease development. | PPFS-AG-SG-4
web only | 3 pages | 765 words | 1 download | PDF: 308 kb


Barley Yellow Dwarf
1/1/2011 (minor revision)

Barley yellow dwarf (BYD) is a virus disease that can cause serious yield loss when stunted and discolored plants are widely distributed in a field. Severe losses due to BYD occur state-wide about every five years or so, but individual fields are impacted to varying degrees each year. There are many diseases that can reduce wheat yields, but in the case of BYD, most of the disease management decisions (such as field selection, tillage practices, variety, and planting date) are made by the time the seed is actually sown in the fall. | PPFS-AG-SG-3
web only | 5 pages | 1,959 words | 1 download | PDF: 602 kb


Real-time PCR Detection of Xylella fastidiosa is Independent of Sample Storage Time and Temperature
11/1/2010 (new)

The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, first associated with Pierce's disease of grapevines and alfalfa dwarf disease in 1973 (4) continues to be an economically important pathogen of several commercial crops. It also causes bacterial leaf scorch in urban shade trees such as sycamore, oaks, maples, mulberry, and elm (5). The usual course of action, in an effort to control the spread of this pathogen by insect vectors (9), is to prune out infected branches and vines or to rogue infected plants. Therefore, timely testing of suspect hosts is important. | PPFS-MISC-4
web only | 7 pages | 3,014 words | 1 download | PDF: 236 kb


Foliar Diseases of Cucurbits
11/1/2010 (new)

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, gourds, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the foliage of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens. | PPFS-VG-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,383 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 327 kb


Fruit Rots of Cucurbits
11/1/2010 (new)

Vegetables in the cucurbit family include cucumber, muskmelon (cantaloupe), summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkin. The following diseases primarily affect the fruit of these crops and can result in losses in commercial fields and home gardens. | PPFS-VG-7
web only | 5 pages | 1,411 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 315 kb


Turfgrass Anthracnose
8/1/2010 (minor revision)

Anthracnose is primarily a disease of high maintenance turfgrass, such as annual bluegrass (Poa annua) and creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) at golf courses. In Kentucky it can be a disfiguring disease of creeping bentgrass under putting green management conditions during summertime (June to September). The disease may make its appearance on intensely managed annual bluegrass somewhat earlier (April to September). The anthracnose pathogen can incite a foliar blight phase or the more destructive basal rot phase. | PPFS-OR-T-4
web only | 4 pages | 1,262 words | 1 download | PDF: 527 kb


Soybean Loss Prediction Tool for Managing Soybean Rust
7/1/2010 (new)

Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a potentially devastating foliar disease of soybean. The disease was first detected in the Continental United States in the fall of 2004. Since that time, it has caused only sporadic yield losses in the U.S., primarily in the Gulf States. However, the potential still exists for devastating losses to occur in all soybean producing areas of the U.S. should the proper combination of weather conditions come together to support significant disease development by mid-summer. Currently, the only way to avert significant yield loss caused by SBR when disease risk is high is by applying foliar fungicides. | PPFS-AG-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,542 words | 1 download | PDF: 656 kb


Soybean Rust Fungicide Use Guidelines
6/1/2010 (minor revision)

Effective use of fungicides to control soybean rust is not very complicated. The whole idea is to wait to spray until the soybean rust risk is at least moderate, and make a fungicide application before significant infection has occurred. This means applying fungicides when plant pathologists in and around Kentucky are "sounding the alarm," but before symptoms are evident. Many soybean producers in the deep South have been using fungicides to control soybean rust since 2005 with considerable success. I believe we will have the same experience if it ever becomes necessary to apply fungicides for soybean rust in Kentucky. | PPFS-AG-S-23
web only | 2 pages | 407 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 473 kb


Calendar for Diseases of Cool-season Grasses in Kentucky
6/1/2010 (new)

A graphic representation showing the times of year that diseases of cool-season grasses are likely. | PPFS-OR-T-7
web only | 2 pages | 125 words | 1 download | PDF: 161 kb


Wheat Bacterial Streak
5/1/2010 (new)

Occasionally, wheat leaves and spikes are invaded by the bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris pv. translucens. When leaf tissue is affected, the resulting disease is known as bacterial streak. When the bacterium invades the head, the disease is called black chaff. While this disease has primarily been a problem in the lower mid-South, it is often found in Kentucky in fields that have been impacted by strong winds with blowing soil or following a damaging freeze. | PPFS-AG-SG-2
web only | 3 pages | 789 words | 1 download | PDF: 247 kb


Take-All of Wheat
5/1/2010 (minor revision)

"Take-all" is the common name of a root, crown, and basal stem (foot) rot that primarily affects wheat, but can also affect barley, oats, rye, as well as other grass crops and weeds. The disease has been known to destroy entire stands of wheat, thus the name. Barley, oats, rye, and other grass crops, however, have not been seriously impacted in Kentucky. Take-all is most common where susceptible crops are grown continuously without adequate rotation, or in fields where weedy grass hosts were not controlled in non-host crops, and were subsequently sown to wheat. The disease is rarely a serious problem in Kentucky due to excellent weed control practices, as well as the widespread adoption of cropping systems where wheat is produced, at most, every other year. | PPFS-AG-SG-1
web only | 2 pages | 749 words | - | PDF: 248 kb


Poinsettia Diseases
5/1/2010 (minor revision)

Poinsettias grown through the fall months for Christmas sales are vulnerable to destructive diseases from the time the cuttings are stuck into the rooting media until they are mature and ready for sale. A number of poinsettia diseases are favored by the same environmental conditions that promote propagation, making plant material at this stage particularly vulnerable. Diseases occurring in the later stages of production can be related to management issues or cultural problems, as well as the cooler temperatures needed for finishing. Some other diseases can be problematic to poinsettias at any phase of production. And finally, a phytoplasma organism found associated with poinsettias provides evidence that some host/pathogen relationships can actually be economically beneficial. | PPFS-GH-6
web only | 6 pages | 1,122 words | - | PDF: 1,335 kb


Soybean Diseases Control Series: Soybean Cyst Nematode
1/1/2010 (minor revision)

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) exists virtually everywhere soybean is grown in Kentucky. The pest is insidious in that significant yield damage often occurs without the appearance of visible disease symptoms. This is an extremely important point because it suggests that farmers are frequently unaware that SCN is active and doing damage in a field. | PPFS-AG-S-13
web only | 4 pages | 1,774 words | 1 download | PDF: 336 kb


Cercospora Leaf Blight in Kentucky
10/1/2009 (new)

In most years, Cercospora leaf blight (CLB) is a minor disease problem in Kentucky soybeans. It is one of the more common "late-season" diseases, but usually comes in too little, too late to cause damage. However, in wet, late seasons like the one we experienced in 2009, significant yield and grain/seed quality losses can occur in fields that develop severe CLB before pod fill has completed. | PPFS-AG-S-20
web only | 3 pages | 729 words | 1 download | PDF: 296 kb


Reducing the Risk of Resistance to Fungicides Used to Control Diseases of Turfgrasses
8/1/2009 (new)

Fungicides can be an important tactic in an overall integrated program for turf disease control. In order to insure that products available today remain available in the future, golf course superintendents should be aware of the need to use fungicides in ways that minimize the risk of fungicide resistance. | PPFS-OR-T-2
web only | 3 pages | 830 words | 1 download | PDF: 183 kb


Weather Favorable for Cottony Blight in Turfgrasses
8/1/2009 (minor revision)

Hot, humid weather with occasional showers is favorable for cottony blight, caused by various Pythium species. This disease, also known as Pythium blight, can be very destructive in swards of creeping bentgrass and perennial ryegrass in a high-maintenance setting, such as golf courses, croquet courts, etc. Cottony blight can occasionally be found on other cool-season turfgrasses, though very infrequently. | PPFS-OR-T-1
web only | 2 pages | 622 words | 1 download | PDF: 267 kb


An IPM Scouting Guide for Common Problems of Cucurbit Crops in Kentucky
7/27/2009 (minor revision)

Long before the term "sustainable" became a household word, farmers were implementing sustainable practices in the form of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. IPM uses a combination of biological, cultural, physical, and chemical methods to reduce and/or manage pest populations. These strategies are used to minimize environmental risks, costs, and health hazards. Pests are managed to reduce their negative impact on the crop, although pests are rarely eliminated. | ID-91
5,000 printed copies | 24 pages | 6,729 words | 29 downloads | PDF: 1,863 kb


Crown Rots of Alfalfa
5/1/2009 (minor revision)

Crown rots are chronic disease problems of alfalfa throughout the world. Crown rots cause loss of stand and forage yield in several ways. If the crowns are rotted severely enough, infected plants will die simply by being choked off. Carbohydrates for winter survival are stored in the crown and upper taproot. By rotting this area, crown rots also make alfalfa plants more sensitive to winter kill. Some crown rot fungi produce toxins, thus weakening or even killing the plant. | PPFS-AG-F-5
web only | 2 pages | 565 words | 1 download | PDF: 239 kb


Destructive Diseases Common on Turfgrasses in Kentucky
5/1/2009 (minor revision)

A list of diseases that are common in Kentucky on the host grasses indicated. This list includes only common diseases, and is not meant to provide a comprehensive list of all diseases diagnosed on turfgrasses grown in Kentucky. | PPFS-OR-T-9
web only | 2 pages | 250 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 241 kb


Common Alfalfa Seedling Diseases and Disorders
3/1/2009 (minor revision)

Alfalfa seedlings are subject to a number of biotic and abiotic problems which can affect establishment. Several of the more common seedling diseases and disorders are described below. This information is being provided as a diagnostic aid; publications which provide specific management and production information can be found in the resource list. | PPFS-AG-F-3
web only | 2 pages | 639 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 115 kb


Value of Wheat Residue in Soybean Cyst Nematode Management
3/1/2009 (minor revision)

Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) is the most widespread and significant pest of soybean in Kentucky. SCN is managed primarily by rotating fields to non-host crops (such as corn) and using SCN-resistant varieties. However, for a variety of reasons, producers occasionally desire to plant a SCN-susceptible variety. | PPFS-AG-S-8
web only | 3 pages | 914 words | 1 download | PDF: 218 kb


"Emergency" Inoculation for Poorly Inoculated Legumes
2/1/2009 (minor revision)

Frequently, stunted and yellowed legumes are thought by growers to be diseased. Close examination often reveals that such "diseased" plants are actually just poorly nodulated. | PPFS-AG-F-4
web only | 3 pages | 912 words | 1 download | PDF: 187 kb


Risk Factors for Sclerotinia Crown and Stem Rot in Fall-Seeded Alfalfa
12/1/2008 (minor revision)

Alfalfa seeded during late summer or fall is susceptible to the destructive disease Sclerotinia crown and stem rot. Fall-seeded stands are particularly vulnerable to this disease because the young seedlings have not had sufficient time to develop adequate resistance before infectious spores of the pathogen are produced in late October. In contrast, spring-seeded stands are able to develop larger, more resistant crowns prior to this infectious period. Thus, spring plantings are better able to withstand an attack, should these air-borne spores be present in the field. | PPFS-AG-F-2
web only | 3 pages | 977 words | 1 download | PDF: 280 kb


Alfalfa Diseases Caused by Rhizoctonia Fungi
11/1/2008 (minor revision)

Rhizoctonia fungi, particularly Rhizoctonia solani, are found in most agricultural soils in Kentucky. These fungi are natural soil inhabitants that colonize and live on dead organic matter. Under the right environmental conditions, the Rhizoctonia organisms are often able to attack living plants, including alfalfa. When warm, wet conditions prevail, Rhizoctonia fungi can cause just about every conceivable type of alfalfa disease. | PPFS-AG-F-6
web only | 3 pages | 701 words | 1 download | PDF: 294 kb


Summertime Foliar Diseases of Alfalfa
11/1/2008 (minor revision)

Warm, humid weather can favor development of foliar diseases of alfalfa during summer. | PPFS-AG-F-1
web only | 2 pages | 409 words | 1 download | PDF: 194 kb


Seed and Seedling Diseases of Corn
10/1/2008 (minor revision)

Corn seeds and seedlings are susceptible to infection by a number of soilborne fungi. When planted into cool, wet soils, seeds may decay before or after germination. Affected plants that survive past the seedling stage may go on to produce an ear if nodal roots develop normally, although stunting and reduced ear size can occur as a result of seedling diseases. Severely affected plants may die during stressful weather as the result of an inadequate root system. | PPFS-AG-C-2
web only | 2 pages | 430 words | 1 download | PDF: 160 kb


Diseases of Concern in Continuous Corn
10/1/2008 (minor revision)

Although most corn in Kentucky is planted following a rotation to other crops, individual producers are often interested in planting corn following corn. In these situations, one of the main concerns voiced by producers is increased pressure from diseases, and rightfully so. Crop rotation is one of the most fundamental disease control practices available. Rotating to other crops deprives pathogens (disease-causing microorganisms) of a food source and exposes them to "starvation." Furthermore, as infested crop residues decompose, pathogens are exposed to antagonism by native soil microbes. These mechanisms have the effect of naturally reducing the populations of many pathogens in the soil. | PPFS-AG-C-1
web only | 4 pages | 1,434 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 233 kb


Southern Blight of Soybeans
10/1/2008 (minor revision)

Southern blight is a minor disease of soybeans in the United States. Although the disease can occur in plants anytime from emergence through pod fill, it most commonly occurs in isolated plants in the latter stages of reproductive development. Occasionally, southern blight develops when plants are in the early to mid-vegetative stages. When this occurs, the disease may spread rapidly down rows, resulting in serious stand losses in patches. However, even in the worst case scenario, it would be extremely rare for southern blight to cause measurable yield losses in a commercial soybean field. | PPFS-AG-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 641 words | 1 download | PDF: 207 kb


Fruit Rots of Grape
10/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky's typically wet springs and warm, humid summers favor the development of several fruit rots of grape. These include anthracnose, bitter rot, black rot, Botrytis bunch rot, ripe rot, and sour rot. | PPFS-FR-S-14
web only | 7 pages | 2,467 words | 1 download | PDF: 358 kb


Downy Mildew of Grape
9/1/2008 (new)

Downy mildew is an important disease of commercial and backyard grapes in Kentucky. This disease causes direct losses when flowers, clusters, and shoots decay and yields are reduced. Indirect losses result when premature defoliation predisposes grapevines to winter injury. It may take a vineyard several years to fully recover after severe winter injury. | PPFS-FR-S-13
web only | 3 pages | 987 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 282 kb


Poor Fruit Set in Brambles
9/1/2008 (new)

Poor fruit set and sterility commonly occur on bramble fruits (red raspberries, black raspberries, and blackberries) both in commercial and home plantings. Typically the fruit fails to develop or small misshapen berries form. When an insufficient number of drupelets fully develop, they tend to separate so that the fruit "crumbles" when picked. This symptom, referred to as "crumbly berry," is another common result of poor fruit set. | PPFS-FR-S-9
web only | 4 pages | 1,393 words | 1 download | PDF: 234 kb


Phytophthora Root Rot of Brambles
7/1/2008 (new)

Brambles that are subjected to wet soil conditions or periods of flooding are often predisposed to Phytophthora root rot. Excess water not only promotes susceptibility of roots to this disease, but also aids the fungus in moving to new infection sites. Phytophthora root rot is primarily a disease of raspberries; however, it can also occur on blackberries. | PPFS-FR-S-7
web only | 2 pages | 655 words | 1 download | PDF: 296 kb


Bacterial Canker of Tomato
7/1/2008 (new)

Bacterial canker is a potentially serious disease of tomato that can occur in commercial plantings and home gardens. This infectious disease is capable of spreading rapidly, resulting in devastating losses. It is a particularly difficult disease to manage because not only is there no cure, but the pathogen can be hard to eradicate once it has been introduced into a greenhouse, garden, or field. | PPFS-VG-6
web only | 3 pages | 840 words | 1 download | PDF: 392 kb


Strawberry Fruit Rots
6/1/2008 (new)

Strawberry fruit rot diseases often make it difficult to obtain high yields of quality berries. Kentucky's typically moist springtime growing conditions favor these diseases, which often begin with infections of flowers at bloom. Diseases causing the decay of developing and ripe strawberries include gray mold, leather rot, and anthracnose. | PPFS-FR-S-8
web only | 5 pages | 2,025 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 274 kb


Black Rot of Crucifers
2/1/2008 (minor revision)

Black rot, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), can be a very destructive disease of cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli. Other susceptible crucifers include: collards, kale, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, turnip, mustard, radish, and rutabaga. | PPFS-VG-1
web only | 3 pages | 792 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 227 kb


Blueberry Diseases
1/1/2008 (new)

Kentucky blueberry growers sometimes experience plant and crop losses due to diseases. While most losses are due to root rot, or to stem and twig canker diseases, fruit rots and nutritional problems can also reduce yields. With good crop management, most blueberry diseases can be avoided. | PPFS-FR-S-10
web only | 4 pages | 1,107 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 292 kb


Southern Blight
1/1/2008 (minor revision)

Southern blight affects a wide variety of crops, but the disease most commonly occurs in Kentucky on ajuga, beans, cabbage, cucumbers, pepper, soybeans, and tomato. Other susceptible plants include apple, carrot, columbine, coreopsis, eggplant, lupine, muskmelon, peanut, pumpkin, peony, phlox, potato, radish, rhubarb, sweet woodruf, tarragon, tobacco, turnip, watermelon, and vinca. | PPFS-VG-3
web only | 2 pages | 591 words | 1 download | PDF: 242 kb


Blossom End Rot
1/1/2008 (minor revision)

Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder (non-parasitic disease) caused by a lack of calcium (Ca) in the distal ends of developing fruit. Calcium is an essential part of the chemical "glue" that binds cells together within the fruit. When fruits are enlarging rapidly, sufficient amounts of Ca fail to reach the end of the fruit and cells then come apart. This is because Ca is not a very mobile element, so any disruption in uptake of Ca can result in a deficiency of Ca in developing fruit. | PPFS-VG-2
web only | 2 pages | 518 words | 1 download | PDF: 165 kb


Bacterial Leaf Scorch
7/1/2007 (new)

Bacterial leaf scorch has devastated many landscape and shade trees in Kentucky's urban forests in recent years. Especially hard hit have been the mature pin oaks lining many urban streets. First diagnosed in the U.S. in the early 1980s, this epidemic shows no signs of abating. | PPFS-OR-W-12
web only | 6 pages | 1,885 words | 1 download | PDF: 249 kb


Peach Fruit Diseases
6/1/2007 (new)

Peaches are grown in many Kentucky orchards for local fresh market sales. Fruit diseases, often resulting in decayed peaches, are a serious problem, especially during warm, humid, rainy weather conditions. | PPFS-FR-T-9
web only | 5 pages | 1,737 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 277 kb


Grape Crown Gall
5/1/2007 (new)

Crown gall is a common, devastating grape disease that has been known to result in losses of entire vineyards in Kentucky. Besides grapes, over 600 types of plants are known to be susceptible to crown gall, including apples, stone fruits and brambles. | PPFS-FR-S-11
web only | 3 pages | 871 words | 3 downloads | PDF: 168 kb


Orange Rust of Brambles
9/1/2006 (new)

Orange rust is a disease caused by one of two very similar fungi, Gymnoconia nitens in the Southeast, and Arthuriomyces peckianus in the Midwest. Both fungi, causing the same symptoms, may be active in Kentucky. In Kentucky, orange rust is severe on some wild and cultivated thorny blackberries. It infects black and purple raspberries and thornless blackberries somewhat, but is not known to infect red raspberries. | PPFS-FR-S-6
web only | 2 pages | 657 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 232 kb


Slime Mold, Lichens, and Sooty Mold Problems on Plants
8/1/2006 (minor revision)

Slime molds are amoeba-like organisms which feed on bacteria and yeasts in the soil. During cloudy, humid weather these molds grow out of the soil and creep onto whatever is available. Turfgrass, weeds, strawberries, bedded flowers, and ground covers, as well as mulches, sidewalks and driveways may become covered with masses of gray, yellowish or black dusty spores. | PPFS-GEN-6
web only | 2 pages | 583 words | 1 download | PDF: 208 kb


Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot and Eutypa Dieback Diseases of Grape
11/1/2005 (minor revision)

"Cane and leaf spot" and "Eutypa dieback" were once thought to be the same disease. However, it is now known that each is a distinct disease caused by a different fungus. Grapes grown in areas where a moist environment persists are especially vulnerable to these fungal diseases. | PPFS-FR-S-1
web only | 2 pages | 631 words | 1 download | PDF: 183 kb


Controlling Phytophthora Root Rot in Greenhouse Ornamentals
5/1/2005 (minor revision)

Phytophthora fungi can attack a number of potted herbaceous ornamentals produced in greenhouses. The potted flowering plants reported as hosts include: begonia, bougainvillea, ornamental pepper, vinca, poinsettia, Persian violet, fuchsia, common gardenia, African daisy, kalanchoe, Lantana, African violet, holiday cactus, gloxinia, and Jerusalem cherry. | PPFS-GH-5
web only | 2 pages | 613 words | 1 download | PDF: 615 kb


Shoestring Root Rot: A Cause of Tree and Shrub Decline
5/1/2005 (minor revision)

Most woody landscape plants are susceptible to shoestring root rot, cause of dieback and decline in the landscape. Diagnosis of this problem requires close examination of the base of the trunk which often reveals loose or decayed bark and dead cambium. By peeling back the bark one can often observe dark brown rhizomorphs (thick strands of hyphae), resembling narrow "shoestrings." | PPFS-OR-W-5
web only | 2 pages | 415 words | 1 download | PDF: 337 kb


Apple Fruit Diseases Appearing at Harvest
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Diseases of apple fruits appearing at harvest can cause significant losses in yield and quality. To know what control measures to take next year to prevent similar losses, it is important to recognize what is being observed. In some cases, growers will need to cut the fruit open to identify the problem. | PPFS-FR-T-2
web only | 2 pages | 613 words | 1 download | PDF: 306 kb


Powdery Mildew
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Powdery mildew may affect numerous ornamentals, fruits, vegetables, and agronomic crops. In Kentucky, mildew diseases are most commonly observed on apple, begonia, crabapple, cherry, dogwood, lilac, phlox, pin oak, rose, sycamore, tuliptree, turfgrass, zinnia, squash, pumpkin, cantaloupe, wheat and barley. | PPFS-GEN-2
web only | 2 pages | 472 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 240 kb


Crown Gall
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Crown gall can affect a wide range of crops, including woody ornamentals, tree fruits and small fruits. Some vegetable and herbaceous ornamentals are also susceptible but these crops are less commonly affected. | PPFS-GEN-1
web only | 2 pages | 593 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 210 kb


Oedema
8/1/2004 (minor revision)

Odema is a non-parasitic disorder which, under the right environmental conditions, can affect a wide variety of herbaceous plants. We most frequently observe this problem on indoor plants, such as dracaena, geranium and schefflera. Oedema tends to be more of a problem in greenhouses, but it may also occur on plants grown in homes and offices. Field and garden grown crops, such as cabbage, may also be affected. | PPFS-OR-H-5
web only | 1 pages | 318 words | - | PDF: 150 kb


Raspberry Fruit Rots
7/1/2004 (minor revision)

Rainy summer and fall weather in Kentucky can provide ideal conditions for fruit decay diseases of raspberries. The most damaging are the fungal diseases gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) and soft rot, or leak (Rhizopus and Mucor spp.). Both diseases are favored by long periods of wet fruit and foliage, and by high humidity levels. During some parts of the season, fruit rots account for up to 50% loss of potential harvest, and additional losses after harvest. | PPFS-FR-S-4
web only | 2 pages | 446 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 181 kb


Blackberry Rosette (Double Blossom)
7/1/2004 (minor revision)

Rosette disease, caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi, is a serious and destructive disease of blackberries in most parts of Kentucky. In some locations, growers have been forced out of growing blackberries because of rosette disease. | PPFS-FR-S-3
web only | 2 pages | 516 words | 2 downloads | PDF: 208 kb


An Alfalfa Disease Calendar
5/1/2000 (new)

| PPA-44
1,500 printed copies | 4 pages | - | 6 downloads | PDF: 168 kb