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trees


HO-117

Guide to Landscape Appraisal of Tree Species in Kentucky Landscapes

8/26/2019 (new)
Authors: Bill Fountain

This publication is intended to aid professionals in determining the value of species in Kentucky (the Commonwealth). This valuation method is not appropriate for valuation of shrubs, forest trees, pasture trees, trees being used for income (i.e. orchards, nursery production, Christmas tree production, etc.). It is solely for trees that are an integral part of a formal, managed landscape.

Departments: Horticulture
Series: Horticulture (HO series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: mb
Pages:



ID-253

Species Failure Profile for Trees Common to the Ohio River Valley

8/23/2019 (new)
Authors: Julie Beale, Bill Fountain

Tree failures, especially in urban and recreational areas can result in harm to human life and property. While this is rare, it is important to recognize that the environmental and sociological benefits provided by trees significantly outweighs the limited risks presented by trees. This is especially true when defects and species profiles that increase the potential for failure can be observed or detected. Many of these defects are associated with certain species. This is referred to as the species failure profile.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 320 kb
Pages: 8



ID-244

Landscape Site Assessment

9/6/2017 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Rick Durham, Bill Fountain

The most common reason trees and shrubs fail to perform as anticipated is that their cultural requirements differ from the site characteristics. People often plant things they know and love from a distant state, purchase because they are on sale, or find attractive but don't understand the environmental requirements. In some cases, a site can be easily modified to make it more suitable for a desired species. Most of the time, it is difficult or impossible to change the site characteristics enough for the plant to thrive. Appropriate watering is essential for establishment of recently transplanted trees and shrubs. This becomes even more important (and challenging) for plants poorly matched to their sites. Selecting plant species that will thrive under particular site conditions is an easier and less expensive option. The first step in doing this is to understand the site where you plan to plant.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, shrubs and grasses, trees
Size: 125 kb
Pages: 4



PPFS-OR-W-25

Dothistroma Needle Blight of Pine

7/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Julie Beale, Walt Reichert, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Dothistroma needle blight disease afflicts some of the pine species commonly planted in Kentucky landscapes, resulting in needle browning and unattractive trees. Austrian pine and Mugo pine are most commonly affected. Dothistroma needle blight is infrequently observed on spruce. A closely related fungal disease called brown spot needle blight occasionally affects Scots pine or white pine, although this disease is less common in Kentucky.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Woody Ornamental Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-W series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, pests, plant diseases, trees
Size: 1.05 mb
Pages: 3



PPFS-OR-H-1

Managing Diseases of Herbaceous Ornamentals

5/1/2017 (new)
Authors: Jay Hettmansperger, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Herbaceous landscape ornamentals can succumb to various adverse factors, including infectious and non-infectious diseases. Infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms, such as fungi, fungus-like water molds, bacteria, nematodes, viruses, and phytoplasmas. Abiotic or non-infectious diseases may be attributed to unfavorable growing conditions, which can include nutritional deficiencies, improper soil pH, extreme temperatures, excessive soil moisture, or drought. In order to determine the proper course of action for treatment, it is essential to accurately identify the specific cause(s).

Departments: County Extension, Plant Pathology
Series: Ornamental Plant Disease: Plant Pathology Factsheet (PPFS-OR-H series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, pests, plant diseases, shrubs and grasses, trees
Size: 3.14 mb
Pages: 19



ID-240

What Is Your Tree Worth?

12/22/2016 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Bill Fountain

Occasionally, through no fault of your own, your valuable trees and landscape plants may be damaged. Landscape appraisers are called on to assess individual plants and entire landscapes as a result of storms, human damage, destruction, and failure. Appraisals are an estimate of the nature, quality, value, or utility of an interest or an aspect of real estate.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 903 kb
Pages: 5



ID-241

After Your Ash Has Died: Making an Informed Decision on What to Replant

12/22/2016 (new)
Authors: Ellen Crocker, Bill Fountain, Lee Townsend, Nicole Ward Gauthier

Unfortunately the emerald ash borer is only the latest in a series of invasive pests that have recently decimated our trees. Here, we provide basic information on the death of our ash trees and what types of species are less likely to be impacted by invasive insects and diseases in the future.

Departments: Entomology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 247 kb
Pages: 5



CCD-CP-67

Christmas Trees

8/18/2015 (minor revision)
Authors: Matthew Ernst, Cheryl Kaiser

Christmas trees can be grown on relatively small parcels of land. This enterprise can fit in well with an existing farm or nursery operation. While Christmas tree production does have a high profitability potential, it is also a long-term, risky investment requiring periods of intensive labor.

Departments: Agricultural Economics, Plant Pathology
Series: Crop Profiles: Center for Crop Diversification (CCD-CP series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 492 kb
Pages: 4



ID-50

Shade Tree Decline and Related Problems

7/1/2014 (major revision)
Authors: Jamie Dockery, Kristin Goodin, Cheryl Kaiser, Delia Scott, Nicole Ward Gauthier, Jeremy Williams

Woody plant stress has many causes that might ultimately lead to plant decline. Tree and shrub degeneration is often referred to as a "complex," meaning the condition is usually caused by multiple factors. Typically, one or more primary stresses cause deterioration of plant health, followed by secondary pathogens and/or insects that further decline or destroy plants. Determining causes of decline requires careful examination of plants and growing sites, as well as knowledge of site history. Nevertheless, diagnoses may be difficult, as the original cause(s) of plant stress may be obscure or no longer present. Some of the most common plant stresses are addressed in this publication. A wider range of possible causes of plant stress and decline should be considered during evaluation of woody plant material.

Departments: County Extension, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 9.00 mb
Pages: 11



ID-203

Trees, Turf, and People

8/6/2012 (new)
Authors: Bill Fountain, Gregg Munshaw

The shade trees and fruit trees that we treasure in our landscapes were originally adapted to growing in forests in close association with other trees. In the forest they can remain small for many years. As soon as there is an opening in the canopy allowing light to reach the forest floor they grow rapidly. This great height allows trees to assume a place of dominance over other plants; their trunks lift their leaves high into the air, allowing them to intercept the maximum amount of sunlight before it reaches other plants. Thus, trees grow tall and provide us with their much-appreciated shade.

Departments: Horticulture, Plant and Soil Sciences
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, trees, turfgrass
Size: 1.50 mb
Pages: 4



FOR-119

Uneven-aged Management in Mixed Species, Southern Hardwoods: Is it Feasible and Sustainable?

4/7/2011 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

For uneven-age stands to develop, both young and old trees need to be developing in the same stand, where younger trees are naturally smaller in diameter than older trees. Thus, guidelines and graphs used by foresters to help establish uneven-age stands use diameter as a surrogate for age and assume that age and diameter are related.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 796 kb
Pages: 16



FOR-120

Site Preparation for Natural Regeneration of Hardwoods

4/7/2011 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

One aspect of forest sustainability is regenerating the stand to desired species once the stand is harvested. Usually the species present in the overstory are more desirable than those in the understory and midstory. If management is not performed to adjust the regenerating species composition prior to the harvest, these understory and midstory species likely will be the composition of the future stand.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 557 kb
Pages: 12



FOR-96

Forest Water Quality Plan: Preparing an Agriculture Water Quality Plan for Your Woodlands

5/18/2010 (reprinted)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

All parties involved in woodland operations are responsible for water quality protection. One of the most effective methods of protecting water quality during forestry operations is to use BMPs. BMPs are guidelines and techniques that, when used properly, can help reduce impact to our waters. They do this by decreasing erosion and the creation of muddy water, keeping chemicals and fluids out of streams, and limiting changes in the woods next to streams.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 334 kb
Pages: 12



FOR-107

Site Preparation and Competition Control Guidelines for Hardwood Tree Plantings

8/13/2009 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

This publication presents recommendations for key factors associated with hardwood planting success. The publication also provides competition control and site preparation alternatives for a number of common planting sites and conditions. For each site and condition, several alternatives provide a range of options, allowing users to select the alternative that best fits their objectives and timetables.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 1.35 mb
Pages: 36



FOR-116

Agroforestry: Christmas Trees

8/11/2009 (new)
Authors: Deborah Hill

Kentucky has always had a Christmas tree industry, although at a very small scale. The benefits of producing Christmas trees include guaranteed market every year, a short growing period relative to other tree crops, periodic intensive management (planting, shearing, marketing) but otherwise not much time required in management, and a good return on investment.

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 789 kb
Pages: 2



FOR-105

Caring for Christmas Trees

12/18/2006 (new)
Authors: Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 280 kb
Pages: 4



FOR-100

Oak Shelterwood: A Technique to Improve Oak Regeneration

7/1/2006 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 695 kb
Pages: 8



FOR-101

Hardwood Plantations as an Investment

7/1/2006 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 856 kb
Pages: 8



FOR-104

Treatments for Improving Degraded Hardwood Stands

7/1/2006 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 994 kb
Pages: 12



FOR-99

Managing Oak Decline

7/1/2006 (new)
Authors: Jeff Stringer

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 558 kb
Pages: 6



FOR-17

Kentucky Christmas Tree ProductIon Workbook Plantation Layout

1/30/2004 (minor revision)
Authors: Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 217 kb
Pages: 6



ID-68

The Flowering Crabapple

10/1/1999 (minor revision)
Authors: Rick Durham, Bill Fountain, John Hartman, Bob McNeil, Dan Potter

Departments: Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 331 kb
Pages: 6



FOR-27A

Kentucky Christmas Tree Production Workbook Pest Control: Insects

7/1/1996 (reprinted)
Authors: Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 747 kb
Pages: 7



FOR-15

Managing Sustainable Forests in Kentucky

6/11/1996 (reprinted)
Authors: Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 997 kb
Pages: 28



ID-55

Topping Is Hazardous to Your Tree's Health

1/1/1996 (reprinted)
Authors: Win Dunwell, John Hartman, Cheryl Kaiser, Bob McNeil, Mary Witt

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, nursery and landscape, ornamental plants, trees
Size: 200 kb
Pages: 3



FOR-23

Kentucky Christmas Tree Production Workbook Vegetation Control

10/1/1992 (new)
Authors: Bonnie Appleton, Deborah Hill

Departments: Forestry and Natural Resources
Series: Forestry and Natural Resources (FOR series)
Tags:
Size: 248 kb
Pages: 7



ID-80

Transplanting Trees and Shrubs

11/1/1990 (reprinted)
Authors: Bill Fountain, John Hartman, Mary Witt

Departments: Horticulture, Plant Pathology
Series: Interdepartmental (ID series)
Tags: crops and plants, garden and landscape, ornamental plants, shrubs and grasses, trees
Size: 1.00 mb
Pages: 8